Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Ordinary resident years for home student fees and can I switch fee status Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    I moved to the UK in September 2015 for my A levels and I have a UK passport as my Dad is English. I lived in Asia most of my life before this, and I'll be in the UK for 2 years before I start uni. If I'm applicable for becoming a home student in my second year, can I switch fee status? I'm thinking of applying for Biological sciences at Sheffield, Imperial, Edinburgh, Oxford and York.

    Another problem is I rang up student finance to ask about home student eligibility in feb and they said they're changing the ordinary residence years from 3 to 5, which will cover my entire time at uni. Anyone know if I'm entering uni in 2017 does that mean it's 3 or 5 years?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hksg)
    I moved to the UK in September 2015 for my A levels and I have a UK passport as my Dad is English. I lived in Asia most of my life before this, and I'll be in the UK for 2 years before I start uni. If I'm applicable for becoming a home student in my second year, can I switch fee status? I'm thinking of applying for Biological sciences at Sheffield, Imperial, Edinburgh, Oxford and York.

    Another problem is I rang up student finance to ask about home student eligibility in feb and they said they're changing the ordinary residence years from 3 to 5, which will cover my entire time at uni. Anyone know if I'm entering uni in 2017 does that mean it's 3 or 5 years?
    I believe it has already been changed to 5 years - I had a look though and that seems to be for EU students. It still seems to say 3 years for any other international students but I would ring and check if I were you.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hksg)
    I moved to the UK in September 2015 for my A levels and I have a UK passport as my Dad is English. I lived in Asia most of my life before this, and I'll be in the UK for 2 years before I start uni. If I'm applicable for becoming a home student in my second year, can I switch fee status?
    No. Your status is determined by the length of your UK residency at the start of your course. This will not change at any point. In addition, residence for the purpose of education is excluded from Ordinary Residence calculations, so you cannot build up years of qualifying residence whilst at university.

    Finally, if you come to the UK solely for the purpose of education (as you did) then you can never build up qualifying years of residence and you will always be considered an International student for whatever courses you undertake in the UK. Your passport, citizenship etc., are irrelevant.
    *
    Another problem is I rang up student finance to ask about home student eligibility in feb and they said they're changing the ordinary residence years from 3 to 5, which will cover my entire time at uni. Anyone know if I'm entering uni in 2017 does that mean it's 3 or 5 years?
    For International students, it remains three years. It is now five years for EU/EEA students only. However, as above, you will never qualify as a Home student because your sole reason for coming to the UK, was to do your A Levels.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jenx301)
    I believe it has already been changed to 5 years - I had a look though and that seems to be for EU students. It still seems to say 3 years for any other international students but I would ring and check if I were you.
    Thanks I'll do that
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    No. Your status is determined by the length of your UK residency at the start of your course. This will not change at any point. In addition, residence for the purpose of education is excluded from Ordinary Residence calculations, so you cannot build up years of qualifying residence whilst at university.Finally, if you come to the UK solely for the purpose of education (as you did) then you can never build up qualifying years of residence and you will always be considered an International student for whatever courses you undertake in the UK. Your passport, citizenship etc., are irrelevant.*For International students, it remains three years. It is now five years for EU/EEA students only. However, as above, you will never qualify as a Home student because your sole reason for coming to the UK, was to do your A Levels.
    Thanks for the info, but me moving to the UK for education coincided with my dad losing his job in Hong Kong and my both my grandparents falling seriously ill, thus education was more of a coincidental reason for moving to the UK as both my parents moved over as well.On the UKCISA website it states 'In some circumstances, it is possible to become a 'home' fee payer after the start of your course.' and one of the changes possible for becoming a home student are
    • You already met the relevant three-year residence requirement on the first day of the first academic year of your course, and on the first day of a subsequent academic year you are now:
      • an EU national, or the family member of an EU national
      • an EEA or Swiss migrant worker, or the family member of such a person
      • the child of a Swiss national
    The link to the website is here: http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Information...er-3834I'm not sure whether this is the case at every university, would you recommend checking with the universities it's possible to change, or perhaps I should take a gap year to definitely be considered a home student?
    Thanks again for the help
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hksg)
    Thanks for the info, but me moving to the UK for education coincided with my dad losing his job in Hong Kong and my both my grandparents falling seriously ill, thus education was more of a coincidental reason for moving to the UK as both my parents moved over as well.
    My response was based on the info in your original post, that you came to the UK to do your A Levels. I'm afraid we can't give accurate advice if we don't have all the relevant facts.

    On the UKCISA website it states 'In some circumstances, it is possible to become a 'home' fee payer after the start of your course.' and one of the changes possible for becoming a home student are
    • You already met the relevant three-year residence requirement on the first day of the first academic year of your course, and on the first day of a subsequent academic year you are now:
      • an EU national, or the family member of an EU national
      • an EEA or Swiss migrant worker, or the family member of such a person
      • the child of a Swiss national
    Again based on the info you have supplied, none of this will apply to you.

    The link to the website is here: http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Information...er-3834I'm not sure whether this is the case at every university,
    There is no central legal definition of what constitutes a Home student. Most unis use the same guidelines as Student Finance for simplicity, but they can set their own criteria if they want to.

    would you recommend checking with the universities
    Yes. But whatever you do, make sure that you do *not* tell them that you moved to the UK to do your A Levels. As far as the uni is concerned, family circumstances forced your parents to move to the UK and you came with them. You then did A Levels here.

    perhaps I should take a gap year to definitely be considered a home student?
    Thanks again for the help
    If SF funding is critical, then yes, deferring until you have built up three full years of qualifying residency would seem to be a logical step.

    Check back with SF to confirm, then check with your uni to see whether they will let you defer. Be warned that it is unlikely that you will be allowed to defer for more than a year. Having arrived in September 2015, the earliest you will qualify for full SF will be September 2018. If you arrived on a date after that of your official course start (for example if you arrived on 22nd September and your course start date is 15th September), then you would not qualify until 2019.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    My response was based on the info in your original post, that you came to the UK to do your A Levels. I'm afraid we can't give accurate advice if we don't have all the relevant facts.


    Again based on the info you have supplied, none of this will apply to you.


    There is no central legal definition of what constitutes a Home student. Most unis use the same guidelines as Student Finance for simplicity, but they can set their own criteria if they want to.


    Yes. But whatever you do, make sure that you do *not* tell them that you moved to the UK to do your A Levels. As far as the uni is concerned, family circumstances forced your parents to move to the UK and you came with them. You then did A Levels here.


    If SF funding is critical, then yes, deferring until you have built up three full years of qualifying residency would seem to be a logical step.

    Check back with SF to confirm, then check with your uni to see whether they will let you defer. Be warned that it is unlikely that you will be allowed to defer for more than a year. Having arrived in September 2015, the earliest you will qualify for full SF will be September 2018. If you arrived on a date after that of your official course start (for example if you arrived on 22nd September and your course start date is 15th September), then you would not qualify until 2019.
    Thanks again, so if I told the universities that I moved here based on family circumstances, do you think it could be possible for me to switch funding based on the UKCISA criteria?

    I agree it does seem logical for me to take a gap year, however I'm hoping to apply for Oxford and I don't think they look very kindly on gap year students, also I'm already a year older than I'm supposed to be for my year due to problems from when I moved from Singapore to Hong Kong because of the difference in academic year start dates so a gap year wouldn't be ideal for me.

    Thanks again for all the info, could I ask how you know so much about student funding? (Sorry I'm kind of new to tsr)
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hksg)
    Thanks again, so if I told the universities that I moved here based on family circumstances, do you think it could be possible for me to switch funding based on the UKCISA criteria?
    Possibly, if you explain it in the correct way. But not until 2018 or 2019. I can't see how the UKCISA criteria you quote apply to you as you aren't from the EU/EEA.

    I agree it does seem logical for me to take a gap year, however I'm hoping to apply for Oxford and I don't think they look very kindly on gap year students,
    They're fine with gap year students. Some life experience can be a real advantage.

    also I'm already a year older than I'm supposed to be for my year due to problems from when I moved from Singapore to Hong Kong because of the difference in academic year start dates so a gap year wouldn't be ideal for me.
    Your age isn't relevant to a uni. You just need to be the right candidate and a promising student. I started my most recent undergrad study aged 44. There's no age limit.

    Thanks again for all the info, could I ask how you know so much about student funding? (Sorry I'm kind of new to tsr)
    I've spent a grand total of nine years as a uni student and I currently work at a uni. My own second attempt at an undergrad degree was a wee bit tangled, so I have direct experience of some SF wrinkles. In addition I've been around TSR for a few years now - myself and other regular contributors to this section have seen a lot of questions asked/answered. We have a kind of hive mind and group memory between us
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    Possibly, if you explain it in the correct way. But not until 2018 or 2019. I can't see how the UKCISA criteria you quote apply to you as you aren't from the EU/EEA.


    They're fine with gap year students. Some life experience can be a real advantage.


    Your age isn't relevant to a uni. You just need to be the right candidate and a promising student. I started my most recent undergrad study aged 44. There's no age limit.


    I've spent a grand total of nine years as a uni student and I currently work at a uni. My own second attempt at an undergrad degree was a wee bit tangled, so I have direct experience of some SF wrinkles. In addition I've been around TSR for a few years now - myself and other regular contributors to this section have seen a lot of questions asked/answered. We have a kind of hive mind and group memory between us
    Your info has been such a relief to me! I was so worried about having to pay overseas student fees I've considered trying to get a scholarship in China haha.

    Nice to hear I'm not the only one with SF issues, and that's really great of you to be helping out on TSR I'll definitely be looking into a gap year now too.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.