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    Hi guys, wanted your opinion on what you'd say the best course is to take to become a Vet. I'm asking for my girlfriend she has an offer for Bioveterinary Science and another for Veterinary Nursing Bsc Hons. She only wants to become a vet not a vet nurse. Also which course is better for post grad entry into vet-med? Thanks
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    (Original post by NotACop)
    Hi guys, wanted your opinion on what you'd say the best course is to take to become a Vet. I'm asking for my girlfriend she has an offer for Bioveterinary Science and another for Veterinary Nursing Bsc Hons. She only wants to become a vet not a vet nurse. Also which course is better for post grad entry into vet-med? Thanks
    Biovetinary science. It'll have the theory required to undertake vetinary medicine, while nursing will be much more vocational based.
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    If she definitely wants to be a vet, why is she planning on doing a vet nursing or bioveterinary course first? The quickest and cheapest route will be to take a gap year and reapply. Were her grades the reason that she didn't apply/didn't get in this time around? In that case, depending on what grades she has, it may be possible for her to apply with predicted grades, with a view to resit. If she's lacking work experience currently she can build on this in a gap year.

    Both biovet and vet nursing will allow her to apply onto an 'accelerated' four year course once she'd graduated (neither will offer an advantage/disadvantage over the other), but even then that route will take a total of seven years and graduate fees can reach £29k per year.
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    If she definitely wants to be a vet, why is she planning on doing a vet nursing or bioveterinary course first? The quickest and cheapest route will be to take a gap year and reapply. Were her grades the reason that she didn't apply/didn't get in this time around? In that case, depending on what grades she has, it may be possible for her to apply with predicted grades, with a view to resit. If she's lacking work experience currently she can build on this in a gap year.

    Both biovet and vet nursing will allow her to apply onto an 'accelerated' four year course once she'd graduated (neither will offer an advantage/disadvantage over the other), but even then that route will take a total of seven years and graduate fees can reach £29k per year.
    She doesn't want to take another Gap year as she has already taken one. She sadly missed the deadline due to issues at the start of the year, so she applied for biovet and vet nursing instead before the January deadline. She has loads of work experience in all fields but I think she missed the grade required in chemistry by a few UMS. She wants to pick the option which would look strongest applying for post grad Vet Med, between Biovet and Vet Nursing but is unsure whether Nursing holds enough scientific content for what is required.
    Other than this are there any other routes or methods she could take?
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    I did an Animal Science degree first but even as a graduate many universities will look at A Level grades, particularly Chemistry so I have to say I'd agree with taking a(nother) gap year.
    Lots of my BSc classmates are now at vet school in the UK and said the degree has served them well; I didn't have the A Levels so study abroad.

    Work experience is really important, not just for application but for seeing what and where you would like to practice. You can really tell the vet students who have spent a lot of time in the clinic as they're far more familiar with procedures and pharmacology than others of us.

    You also need to factor in that graduate entry won't receive a student loan and tuition fees of £9,000-£29,000 a year will need to be paid up front, on top of living costs, so it would be far quicker and cheaper to do that.
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    (Original post by NotACop)
    Hi guys, wanted your opinion on what you'd say the best course is to take to become a Vet. I'm asking for my girlfriend she has an offer for Bioveterinary Science and another for Veterinary Nursing Bsc Hons. She only wants to become a vet not a vet nurse. Also which course is better for post grad entry into vet-med? Thanks
    I would personally say bioveterinary science, but she needs to make sure she still has the relevant chemistry A level to do vet med after a degree if it's definitely what she wants to do.


    She also needs to bear in mind that there is no funding for tuition fees for graduate applicants to veterinary medicine. This means paying a minimum of £9000 a year herself (ed and Glasgow are in the £20,000 bracket) which cannot be funded really many other ways other than if she has family which are willing to help her out.


    I'm at vet school now, and I did bioveterinary science. It definitely prepared me better for vet school and I did have the option of doing nursing but the UNIs generally want a science degree rather than a nursing one.


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