vegetarianism Watch

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im a veg, no meat no fish no eggs

its fine, ive grown up like this..

the smell of meat and fish is EUUURGGHHH
Falguni
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(Original post by Unregistered)
im a veg, no meat no fish no eggs

its fine, ive grown up like this..

the smell of meat and fish is EUUURGGHHH
ditto - i hate passing the meat and poultry section in supermarkets - it makes me feel sick! :Po
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EddieB
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(Original post by Falguni)
i am what is known as a pure vegetarian - that is that i am a lacto-vegetarian - no meat, fish or eggs. Yes, it does take a long time to look at ingredients and so i only tend to eat foods which state they are suitable for vegetarians and even then i still have to check for presence of eggs. i am vegetarian from birth so i guess it is easier for me. the reason i am vegetarian is due to my beliefs, i am a hindu and in our sacred texts it says that you can only eat food which can be offered to God - which is only vegetarian foods.

i have eaten eggs in the past in cakes etc, but have now tried to be more careful. its annoying that most sweets contain geletine, and when i was a child i used to buy cola bottles unknowingly. i wish companies would state clearly on foods whether they are sultable for veggies or not.
Lacto-vegetarians are allowed to consume dairy products, but not eggs - is that right ? At least veggie cheese is becoming easier to find now.

But yes, I agree with you. Food labelling is often pretty poor at best and having to scour labels for various different things is a right pain. I always find it funny though that a lot of alleged vegetarians are not familiar with the practice of looking for animal fats and gelatine in the ingredients and will still happily eat such products.
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(Original post by EddieB)
Lacto-vegetarians are allowed to consume dairy products, but not eggs - is that right ? At least veggie cheese is becoming easier to find now.

But yes, I agree with you. Food labelling is often pretty poor at best and having to scour labels for various different things is a right pain. I always find it funny though that a lot of alleged vegetarians are not familiar with the practice of looking for animal fats and gelatine in the ingredients and will still happily eat such products.
I think we just have to be glad that they are doing something - most people aren't making much of an effort to have a healthy and/or eco-sound diet at all. Let's encourage people all we can!=)

Elisabeth
99% vegan!!!=)
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i'm not a vegitarian..i tried it for about 3 months..and i lost way to much weight and beleive or not i was always tired so when sports came around i wasn't in great shape the first season so i had to start eating meat again..now i don't think i'll ever be a vegiatarian again..too extreme for me..

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extract from website:www.highvibrations.org

any views welcomed...

Are We Meat-Eaters By Nature?
It has been found that the diet of any animal in its natural state corresponds to its anatomical structure and general body functions. Upon close examination, it is obvious that humans are not naturally suited to a diet which includes flesh.

INTESTINE:

For example, the natural carnivores (such meat-eating animals as the wolf, lion, hyena, and cat) all possess a digestive tract only three times the length of the animal's body, and are thus capable of eliminating rapidly decaying substances (such as meat) in a very short time.

The intestinal canal is relatively simple, and not convoluted. Unlike in vegetarians, the stomach is rich in hydrochloric acid, which enables them to digest bone and the tough fibrous tissue found in animal muscle.

On the other hand, the intestinal canal of humans and other naturally vegetarian animals (such as the anthropoid ape, camel, cow, horse) is ten to twelve times the length of the body, forming a winding, intricate route poorly adapted for the digestion and elimination of flesh food.

The digestive system of the natural omnivores (flesh and plant eaters such as the bear, raccoon, and wild boar) lies between these extremes, as they, too, are ideally suited to consume their natural diet.
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TEETH:

Along with sharp claws, all carnivores are given powerful jaws and long fangs — the sharp, elongated canine teeth for spearing and tearing flesh. Dr. A. S. Romer, Professor Emeritus of Zoology at Harvard, has written that "the canines . . . are long and pointed stabbing weapons in all flesh eaters."

The so-called "canine teeth" in humans (termed thus because of the relative position in the mouth) have no resemblance to those found in the dog, cat, or even the omnivorous bear. On the other hand, the vegetarian animals are well equipped with sharp incisor teeth for biting into fresh fruits and vegetables; and unlike the meat-eaters they possess very well developed molar teeth for grinding and chewing of vegetables, fruits, and nuts. The cat, for example, has no chewing ability whatsoever.

Nor has human dental structure significantly changed either from or to that of a flesh-eater, in all the time he has been on this planet, in the opinion of noted scientists.

"At the period and place, whenever and wherever it was, when man first lost his hairy covering, he probably inhabited a hot country; a circumstance favourable for the frugivorous diet on which, judging from analogy, he subsisted." — Charles Darwin (The Descent Of Man, 2nd ed., 1874, page 156.)

The French naturalist, Baron Cuvier, also put forth this view: "Fruits, roots, and the succulent parts of vegetables appear to be the natural food of man: his hands afford him a facility in gathering them; and his short and comparatively weak jaws, his short canine teeth not passing beyond the common line of the others, and the tuberculous teeth, would not permit him either to feed on herbage or devour flesh, unless those aliments were previously prepared by the culinary processes."

In his article, "Source of Perfect Nourishment: The Plant Kingdom" (1949) Geoffrey Hodson quotes the great Swedish naturalist, Karl von Linne' (Linnaeus): "Man's structure, external and internal, compared with that of other animals, shows that fruit and succulent vegetables constitute his natual food."

He also cites the opinion of Ernst Haeckel, "Whatever part of the body we consider, we find upon the most exact examination that man is more nearly related to the higher apes (eaters of fruit and nuts) than are the highest apes to the lowest apes. It would therefore be unwarranted to regard man as constituting a (biological/anatomical) class by himself."

It would be imposslble to adequately discuss in this little treatise, the religious views on vegetarianism around the world; it suffices to say that there is considerable reference in both Old and New Testaments to the concept that people were created as totalvegetarians (Gen. 1:29) and will eventually return to this Edenic condition (Isaiah 11:6-9). And on the other side of the fence, anthropologists — no matter how far back in time they go — are unable to come up with any proof that humans have ever been NATURALLY carnivorous. On the contrary, all the scientific evidence points to exactly the opposite conclusion, namely that we have always retained our obviously vegetarian construction, even when apparently forced (as by an ice age, or a flood) to temporarily turn to flesh-foods for survival in emergency conditions.

We may study the fangs and jaws of the modern tiger, to realize the dental equipment necessary for a true carnivore:

Next, we may see the diagram of the fossilized skull reconstruction of Pithecanthropus erectus — the so-called "Java Man", said by scientists to date back perhaps a half million years. Just as in the Cro-Magnon and the earlier Neanderthal humans, this sub-Neanderthal supposed precursor of humanity displays the teeth of a vegetarian or mainly frugivorous creature! Without indulging in theological and scientific disputations regarding the probable age of this planet, or the pedigree of the human race, we can easily settle this question for ourselves. Simply look in a mirror at YOUR OWN TEETH, or those of any other modern human, and decide if they can be said to resemble (by any stretch of the imagination) the fangs of a vicious tiger, or even a pet cat or dog.

In addition, carnivores perspire through their tongues, as their skin lacks pores. Being mainly nocturnal hunters, they sleep in the heat of the day. Hodson notes, "This is supported by the fact that dogs, being companions to man and having learnt to accompany him by day, thereby being exposed to greater heat, easily become overheated, "perspire" through the tongue, and pant to get cool. Furthermore, if carnivora were to perspire at night there would be danger of sudden chill to the skin."

As vegetarian animals normally function during the day, their skin has millions of pores, and they freely perspire through the skin to regulate body temperature. Once again, the omnivores in between more closely resemble carnivores in this respect than they resemble the vegetarians, including humans.
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OUR NATURAL INSTINCT?

It is also obvious that our sensibilities are not inclined towards fleshfood. All meat-eaters (other than the scavengers: vultures, hyenas, etc.) kill their own prey and eat it in its natural state. Most of us must have our meat slaughtered by proxy, as we would be sickened if forced to kill the animals ourselves. Instead of eating meat in its original state, we age it, and we boil, bake, fry, or broil it, making sure the meat is first suitably "tenderized", and is well-disguised with sauces, spices, and gravies.

If we observe a tiger or leopard stalking its prey, killing and ripping it apart with only fang and claw, and eating it raw, we may then deduce that this animal has a carnivorous instinct. Most humans would become sick to their stomachs at the prospect of killing and eating an animal; even in the few sadistic humans who might relish such a thought and act, this is demonstrably not instinctive but a conditioned indoctrination, as it was not present at birth but carefully learned later in life.

On the other hand, a bowlful of grapes, cherries and peaches, would make any normal human's mouth water; and even the prospect of picking them and eating them fresh from the tree would convey no unpleasant or repulsive sounds, sights, smells, or thoughts. The same bowl of fruit would generally have no attraction whatsoever for the carnivore.

ARE ALL TYPES OF VEGETARIAN CREATURES THE SAME IN DIET?

No, there are many differences arnong the vegetarian animals, and these distinctions also point the way to a natural diet for man. The cloven hooves, several stomachs, and unique dental formula of the cow, for example, indicate that its natural diet consists of grass, herbs, possibly grains, and other plants.

But as we have noted, man bears the closest anatomical resemblance to the anthropoid ape (the very term "anthropoid" meaning literally "man-like"), whose natural diet is composed of fresh fruits, nuts, seeds, and green shoots. Our hands are made perfectly for gathering this type of food-and without any artificial implements whatever-and bear no resemblance to the hooves of the grazing animals or the "paws 'n' claws" of the carnivores.

Our stomach does not have the ruminant's many chambers for digesting grass, nor the murderously high hydrochloric acid content of a carnivore's (very useful in a cat, for example, to digest fur and bones from a mouse).

Certainly, under extreme conditions, animals may seem to be able to eat almost anything and survive for a time. But such emergency measures cannot be considered as a normal — let alone ideal — way of eating or living.

In some cultures and climates, such as in the Arctic regions, meat or animal fat is said to be necessary for survival, as it was during the Ice Age when, scientists believe, man was first forced by expediency and necessity to change from vegetarian to omnivorous diet. Polar explorers in difficult straits, and survivors of shipwrecks and airplane accidents in remote locations, have occasionally even turned to human cannibalism for the sake of emergency survival. However, this clearly is an aberration, and can hardly be said to be a natural or even desirable practice. Obviously, in our civilization meat is definitely not needed for survival, whatever may have been the case in ages past or some exceptional instance of adverse clime or emergency in the present.

So what are we supposed to eat? It seems clear that humans are anatomically and instinctively suited to a diet of fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and perhaps grains. A diet composed entirely of such foods is termed pure vegetarian, total vegetarian, or "vegan".

Others maintain that from a standpoint of convenience, or for other reasons, humans may or should also eat dairy products and/or eggs. These diets are termed lacto-vegetarian (including milk), ovo-vegetarian (including eggs), or lacto-ovo-vegetarian (including both items of diet). Those who use some milk and/or eggs in their diet at present constitute the larger number of vegetarians.

People who include fowl, or fish or seafood in their diet are not vegetarians; they are meat-eaters.
Lucy
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I too don't believe that if you eat fish you're a vegetarian. You're actually a pescatarian (sp?) like me! I haven't eaten other meat for so long now that it just makes me nauseous.
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NOTEWORTHY VEGETARIANS

Vegetarianism has been advocated and practiced by many of the greatest philosophers, scientists, leaders, and others, including Emerson, Thoreau, Buddha, Plato, Socrates, Pythagoras, Origen, Diogenes, Cicero, Herodotus, Porphyry, Sir Isaac Newton, Voltaire, Shelley, Pope, Plutarch, Ovid, H. G. Wells, Maeterlinck, John Wesley, Scott Nearing, Dr. Annie Besant, Field Marshal Lord Montgomery, Sir Stafford Cripps, Air Chief Marshal (RAF — "Battle of Britain") Lord Dowding and Lady Dowding, Louisa May Alcott, Vinoba Bhave, etc.

On the lighter side, in the entertainment world, the ranks of vegetarians have included such stars as the late George Arliss, Dennis Weaver, Clint Walker, Samantha Eggar, **** Gregory, Susan St. James, Candice Bergen, Melanie, and many others.

In the field of sports, a vegetarian regimen has long been known to help build endurance. Among the athletes who have lived and/or trained as vegetarians, are swimmer Johnny Weissmuller, Olympic multiple-gold-medal winner Murray Rose, "Flying Finn" runner Paavo Nurmi, wrestling champ George Hackenschmidt, and "Mr. America" wrestler

Gene Stanlee, Jack McClelland and Bill Pickering are famous channel swimmers who are vegetarian; in 1956, Pickering won farne by swimming the English Channel faster than anyone in history.

The Vegetarian Cycling and Athletic Club has held as many as 40% of the National (bicycle racing) Road Records, although their members comprise a small percentage of the racers. In 1963, vegetarian Ron Murgatroid swept a series of 15 out of 15 bicycle events in Great Britain.

In football, a 1970 article on former Oakland Raiders linebacker Chip Oliver (said to be "one of the finest young prospects in football") noted that he played better after switching to a vegetarian diet. And the annual race — ON FOOT — to the top of Pike's Peak, was recently won two years in a row by a vegetarian.

No serious vegetarian would claim that by adopting this way of living one will automatically become an instant superman, or increase one's I.Q. by 50 points. But we should examine WHY so many thoughtful, intelligent, compassionate people become vegetarians.
A BIOLOGIST LOOKS AT INTENSIVE ANIMAL-FARMING

Writing in regard to the atrocities of the modern factory-farm, Rachel Carson warned not only of the physical harm to the animals and to humans, but also of the ethical and other questions involved:

"As a biologist whose special interests lie in the field of ecology, or the relation between living things and their environment, I find it inconceivable that healthy animals can be produced under the artificial and damaging conditions that prevail in the modern factory-like installations, where animals are grown and turned out like so many inanimate objects. The crowding of broiler chickens, the revolting insanitary conditions in the piggeries, the lifelong confinement of laying hens in tiny cages....

"....This artificial environment is not a healthy one. Diseases sweep through these establishments, which indeed are kept going only by the continuous administrations of antibiotics. Disease organisms then become resistant to the antibiotics. Veal calves, purposely kept in a state of induced anaemia so their white flesh will satisfy

the supposed desires of the gourmet, sometimes drop dead when taken out of their imprisoning crates.

...The menace to human consumers from the drugs, hormones, and pesticides used to keep this whole fantastic operation somehow going is a matter never properly explored.

"The final argument against the intensivism now practised in this branch of agriculture is a humanitarian one . . . Has (man) the right, as in these examples, to reduce life to a bare existence that is scarcely life at all? Has he the further right to terminate these wretched lives by means that are wantonly cruel? My own answer is an unqualified no. "It is my belief that man will never be at peace with his own kind until he has recognized the Schweitzerian ethic that embraces decent consideration for all living creatures — a true reverence for life."
(Rachel Carson, from her Foreword to the book Animal Machines, by Ruth Harrison.)
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Answers to Your Questions
(A page of brief but illuminating answers to some of the questions most often asked about vegetarianism.)

1) CAN YOU REALLY GET ENOUGH PROTEIN? WHAT DO YOU SUBSTITUTE FOR MEAT?

Actually, it is meat that is the substitute for more natural foods, and its place in the diet can be taken easily by these vegetarian foods.

Remember, the vegetable kingdom is the real source of ALL protein. Vegetarians simply eat it "direct" instead of getting it second-hand from the vegetarian animals.

Concentrated sources include most nuts and seeds (about 15-30%, of mainly complete-balance protein); legumes (peas, beans, lentils, about 6-8% protein in the fresh state); leafy greens also contribute an excellent quality protein in smaller but significant amounts. And many vegetarians also use dairy products and/or eggs for this purpose.

Whole grains also furnish protein (averaging 10-12%), and nutritional yeast runs about 50%.

2) ISN'T IT VERY DIFFICULT TO PLAN VEGETARIAN MEALS? AND IT MUST BE BORING, JUST EATING SPINACH AND CELERY?

...Plus a hundred other types of vegetables, plus the delicious seeds and nuts, plus all the luscious ripe fruits, plus the whole grains, plus (for most vegetarians) the variety of daiy products, etc., plus all the innumerable delightful recipes that can be prepared form such tempting natural ingrediants! "Vegetarian" does not mean "straw-eater", nor confine one to vegatables alone. There is a great

assortment of vegetarian recipe books available, and one can become quite a gourmet if one wishes.

It is true that many vegetarians prefer a much simpler dietary regimen, but this is out of choice, not lack of imagination or possibilities.

Vegetarian meals can be nutritious and well-balanced while still being attractive, tasty, and yet simple and easy to prepare. A nice dividend is the liberation from the drudgery of cleaning up greasy pans and sticky ovens. Even when it is cooked, vegetarian food usually requires far less preparation time, and it is much easier to clean up afterwards.

3) WON'T THE ANIMALS OVERRUN THE EARTH, IF WE DO NOT CONTINUE TO KILL AND EAT THEM?

It is difficult to imagine how, considering that virtually all the meat we use from land animals and birds, comes from pitiful domesticated or even caged creatures whom we have specifically bred for this purpose.

At a time when we are exterminating so many species from the face of the earth through greed and rapacious ecological ignorance and manipulation, it should be clear to all by now that it is WE — not the animals — who are in danger of overrunning the earth.

4) CAN I RAISE MY CHILDREN AS VEGETARIANS?

Yes, if you want them to have the best chance of enjoying good health and long, vigorous life.

Comparative medical and dental studies prove that children raised as vegetarians, on the type of rccomlnended natural whole-foods, have incomparably better teeth, and much greater freedom from so-called children's diseases as well as colds, allergies, and problems of degenerative diseases.

5) ISN'T IT A HYPOCRISY FOR A VEGETARIAN TO WEAR FURS, OR LEATHER SHOES?

It would depend upon one's motives for being a vegetarian. If based upon healthful reasons, then it would not necessarily be so inconsistent to wear fur or leather. Most ethical vegetarians would of course oppose killing animals for furs as well as for food.

Many vegetarians hold that leather is a by-product of slaughter rather than a prime cause of it. Many others have re-examined this position, and a large proportion have changed to shoes of natural or synthetic non-animal materials.

Vegetarianisn. is not a monolithic cult; it embraces many points of view, from the basic vegetarian (who eschews meat, fish, and fowl) to the extreme vegan (who uses no food, clothing, soaps, cosmetics, etc., with any animal ingredients).

6 ) EXPERIMENTS INDICATE THAT PLANTS HAVE CONSCIOUSNESS; HOW DO VEGETARIANS FEEL ABOUT THIS?

Wonderful! Vegetarians have been battling for centuries against the cynical attitude that even the ANIMALS are unfeeling brutes; and vegetarian sages of India have taught plant-consciousness and the Universality of all Life, over the past thousands of years. So we are at last making progress in educating the public. Pioneering scientific experiments in this field were made half a century ago by a vegetarian, when Dr. Bose examined rudimentary consciousness in the plants, albeit a greatly different type from that in humans and animals. But we need no Crescograph or Polygraph to prove that ANIMALS are subject to the SAME feelings of pain and emotions as we are.

Still, vegetarians can easily live on those foods which do not require the killing, or even harming, of the plants. These would include ripe fruits & nuts, berries and melons, legumes, tomatoes, seeds, squashes and pumpkins, okras, cucumbers, and many other vegetables. Potatoes are dug from the ground after the planthas died. Most vegetables are annuals, harvested at or near the end of their natural life. But please bear in mind that animals must eat about ten times as much vegetable food to return to us one unit of food value as meat. Thus, even in terms of destruction of plant-life, we see a factor of 10 to 1. Obviously, the question of plant consciousness can only be a strong point FOR vegetarianism.

7) THERE IS SO MUCH CRUELTY TO PEOPLE; WHY DO YOU WASTE TIME ON ANIMALS?

Can we really separate cruelty to fellow man, to children, to animals, or to nature and the world? If we never learn compassion, pity, and mercy for the weak and defenseless, is it likely we will ever begin to treat our fellow man fairly?

ALL brutality and cruelty poisons and stifles the higher, finer nature in humanity; ALL kindness helps make a better world for all. Vegetarianism — and all it implies — is of the utmost importance and potential benefit for animal and human alike. Thus, there is no question of choosing between them.
LH
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(Original post by elisabeth_rb)
I think we just have to be glad that they are doing something - most people aren't making much of an effort to have a healthy and/or eco-sound diet at all. Let's encourage people all we can!=)

Elisabeth
99% vegan!!!=)
Nothing against veggies, but there is nothing unhealthy in eating meat and poultry. Indeed, those who are true omnivores (as the human digestive system is made for meat and vegitables) and who eat the right amounts of meat/poulty etc and the right amount of fruit/vegetables/pulses etc are healthier than those who eat too much of one or the other.

So if you are going to be a veggie, you have to ensure that you get enough of the things your body needs.

This is particularly important for teenage female vegans, who must ensure they get plenty of calcium (mostly found in dairy products) as this will help them to have strong bones and avoid osteoporosis etc.

Basically, if you are going to give up one or more of the major food groups you must be very careful, especially if you are still growing, and ensure that your body gets all it needs.

Humans are omnivores, and balancing out the 'meaty' side from the 'veggie side' is the best way to stay healthy, not just vegetables, they cannot provide you with all you need to stay healthy.
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(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
Humans are omnivores, and balancing out the 'meaty' side from the 'veggie side' is the best way to stay healthy, not just vegetables, they cannot provide you with all you need to stay healthy.
Even though Elisabeth implied that non-veggies are unhealthy it is also an easy misconception for non-veggies to assume eating only vegetables is unhealthy. There are many alternatives to protein in meat; soya, beans, lentils, textured vegetable proteins etc.
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(Original post by Lucy)
Even though Elisabeth implied that non-veggies are unhealthy it is also an easy misconception for non-veggies to assume eating only vegetables is unhealthy. There are many alternatives to protein in meat; soya, beans, lentils, textured vegetable proteins etc.
Yes, that's the important thing. Whenever someone says 'veggie' I always think of a stick-thin model, and when soemone says 'meat-eater' I think of an obese American wearing an undersized T-shirt and baseball cap eating a Big Mac.

But in reality, people fall between these two extremes. But meat is a much tastier way to get protein than textured vegetables.

And the calcium factor must not be overlooked when it comes to vegans.
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Falguni
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HappyCow's List of Famous Vegetarians
Curious if your favorite star, athlete or musician is a vegetarian? We've compiled this list from various sources (unverified) to let everyone know that these famous folks have chosen to be vegetarians. Surprised???


A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada- founder of ISKCON (Hare Krishna movement)
Adam Ant
Ahmet Zappa
Alanis Morissette (Singer)
Albert Einstein
Albert Schweitzer
Alexandra Paul (who used to be on Bay Watch)
Alicia Silverstone
Ally Sheedy
Amy Ray
Angela Bassett, Actress
Annie Lennox
Anthony Grayling (AC Grayling) - The Philosopher and Guardian Writer/Columnist
Anthony Kiedis (lead singer of the band Red Hot Chili Peppers)
Anthony Perkins
Anthony Robbins
Ashley Judd
Belinda Carlisle (From the Go-Go's)
Ben Franklin
Berkley Breathed
Bernadette Peters
Bill Pearl
Bill Walton
Billie Jean King
Bob Barker
Bob Dylan
Bobcat Goldthwait
Bonnie Kline
Boy George
Brad Pitt
Brooke Shields
Bryan Adams
Candice Bergen
Carl Lewis (apparently only when he trains)
Carmen Miranda
Casey Kassem
Charles Darwin
Chelsea Clinton
Cher
Chia Collins
Chrissie Hynde
Christie Brinkley
Claudia Schiffer
Clint Walker
Daniel Johns (Lead singer/guitarist/songwriter/pianist of Australian band 'Silverchair')
Darryl Hannah
Dave Scott
Davey Havok (the singer of the band AFI)
David Duchovny
Dean Ornish, M.D.
Dennis Weaver
**** Gregory
Dizzie Gillespie (jazz musician)
Doctah B Sirius (Producer, Artist, Natural health Researcher, Speaker)
Drew Barrymore
Dwight Yoakum - country-western singer/songwriter
Ed Asner - actor, animal rights activist
Edwin Moses
Elizabeth Berkley
Ellen Degeneres
Elvira
Elvis Costello
Eric Stoltz
Fiona Apple
Fred Schneider
Gandhi
George Bernard Shaw
George Harrison
Grace Slick
Grant Morrison (Very popular Scottish comic book writer (currently writing X-Men))
H. G. Wells
Hank Aaron
Henry David Thoreau
Howard Lyman (author)
Indigo Girls
Jane Wiedlin (From the Go-Go's)
Jiddu Krishnamurti - Eastern Indian spiritual teacher
Joan Armatrading
Joan Baez
John Lennon
Dr. John McDougall - physician, author
John Melton
John Tesh
Joaquin Phoenix
Josh Hartnett
Jude Law
Jullianna Marguiles
Kate Bush
Kathy Johnson
K D Lang
Keenan Ivory Wayans - comic, actor
Kevin Eubanks - Tonight Show's (with Jay Leno) band leader
Kevin Nealon
Killer Kowalski
Kim Basinger
Kirk Cameron
Larry Hagman
Larry Mullen Jr.
LaToya Jackson
Lenny Kravitz
Leo Tolstoy
Leonard Cohen
Leonardo Da Vinci
Linda Blair
Linda Carter
Linda McCartney
Lindsay Wagner
Lisa Bonet
Lisa Simpson
Liv Tyler
Louisa May Alcott
Margi Coleman (Singer, Producer)
Mariel Hemmingway
Mark Millar (Very popular Scottish comic book writer (currently writing X-Men))
Mark Twain
Martha Plimpton
Martina Navratilova
Marv Levy
Mary Tyler Moore
Meatloaf (the actor/singer)
Melissa Etheridge
Meredith Baxter
Michael Bolton
Michael Jackson
Michael Stipe
Moby
Montserrat Caballe (the famous opera singer)
Morrissey
Mr. (Fred) Rogers
Natalie Merchant
Natalie Portman
Dr. Neal Barnard, - President, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
Nina Hagen
Olivia Newton John
Orlando Bloom (Actor, played the elf in Lord of the Rings, also animal rights activist!)
Paige Jones (from the NBC show for love or money)
Pamela Anderson
Paul McCartney
Peter Gabriel
Phil Lesh
Phylicia Rashad
Plato
Prince
Pythagoras
Queen Sofia of Spain
Rabindranath Tagore - Eastern Indian philosopher
Raffi
Ralph Nader
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Richard Thompson
Richie Havens
Ricki Lake
Ringo Starr
River Phoenix
Roseanna Arquette
Ru Paul
Rue McClanahan - actress, animal rights activist
Samantha Eggar (actor)
Sara Gilbert
Seal
Sean Conant (vegan actor)
Shane MacGowan, former lead singer of the irish group "The Pogues"
Shania Twain
Sinead O'Connor
Sir Isaac Newton
Socrates
Sonya Fitzpatrick - otherwise known as the "Pet Psychic"
Stella McCartney - fashion designer and Paul McCartney's daughter
Steve Martin - Actor, comic, author, New Yorker columnist
Steven Jobs
Stevie Wonder
Susan St. James
Thomas Edison
Tim Butler
Tobey Maguire
Tony LaRussa
Tracy Chapman
Vanessa Williams
Vanna White
Voltaire
"Weird" Al Yankovic
William Blake
Willem Dafoe (actor)
William Shatner
Woody Harrelson (actor)
Yasmin Le Bon
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(Original post by Falguni)
HappyCow's List of Famous Vegetarians
Curious if your favorite star, athlete or musician is a vegetarian? We've compiled this list from various sources (unverified) to let everyone know that these famous folks have chosen to be vegetarians. Surprised???


A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada- founder of ISKCON (Hare Krishna movement)
Adam Ant
Ahmet Zappa

Etc.
Either you copied and pasted that, or you have too much time on your hands!
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flyinghorse
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#37
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#37
Well I'm not a vegetarian, but...

Vegetarianism is ace.

As they say, love + wealth + health + vegetarianism = happiness
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Falguni
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
Either you copied and pasted that, or you have too much time on your hands!
yeah i did copy and paste that!
the unregistereds above were me i forgot to log in
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Sarco
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#39
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#39
If i gave up eating meat i would lose weight so much that i would probably be either anorexic or have serious medical problems. There is no other substitute. Also with the amount of sport i play turning vegan would be an impossibility.
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Monkey_Maiden
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#40
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#40
well ive been a vegetarian for 3 weeks now and its hard to start off with, i really miss hot dogs but im determined to stop. only downside is i have to take vitamins to keep up my nutrition.

im kind of confused about this whole eat fish or not but i think a fish is still an animal killed for its meat so i dont eat it
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