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    I understand that numbers can be complex in math, such as e=mc2 or pi or fuzzy logic algo rhythms, but my question is can language also be complex? As in is it possible for somebody to use language in the same way as a mathematician uses complex numbers, with depth and insight, instead of automatically assuming the first gut wrench reaction?!?? interrobang
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    say what
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    All language is complex language
    It has a real part: literal meaning
    And an imaginary part: subtext
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    As in, literature? (Shakespeare wasn't just scrawling down gut reactions when he bawdily punned in iambic pentameter through 38 plays :lol: )

    Language is inherently complex; we can only produce gut responses in our mother tongue because we were raised around people who spoke it, and therefore we subconsciously learned all of the grammatical complexities. (Though, even then, most native speakers of a language could still use a fine tuning.)
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    All language is complex language
    It has a real part: literal meaning
    And an imaginary part: subtext
    hmm i agree with this point
    (Original post by JM_1998)
    As in, literature? (Shakespeare wasn't just scrawling down gut reactions when he bawdily punned in iambic pentameter through 38 plays :lol: )

    Language is inherently complex; we can only produce gut responses in our mother tongue because we were raised around people who spoke it, and therefore we subconsciously learned all of the grammatical complexities. (Though, even then, most native speakers of a language could still use a fine tuning.)
    And i am not too keen on this one, thanks! There is something called metalanguage, which comes from Bourdieus environments and subcultures. Also read up on metaphysics, and post modernism. This is a field which crosses sociology, english and science.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I understand that numbers can be complex in math, such as e=mc2 or pi or fuzzy logic algo rhythms, but my question is can language also be complex? As in is it possible for somebody to use language in the same way as a mathematician uses complex numbers, with depth and insight, instead of automatically assuming the first gut wrench reaction?!?? interrobang
    Paradoxical statements might come into this realm. Statements such as: "This statement is false" and "Trust me: trust nobody" have their literal meanings: "This statement simply is not true" and "I'm telling you to trust nobody". But then there's also the "applied" meaning, I guess, where you apply the statement to itself, and therein lies the paradox: The statement is false, but that is false, so it must be true. But if the statement is true, it says it is false so it must be false... etc...
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    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    Paradoxical statements might come into this realm. Statements such as: "This statement is false" and "Trust me: trust nobody" have their literal meanings: "This statement simply is not true" and "I'm telling you to trust nobody". But then there's also the "applied" meaning, I guess, where you apply the statement to itself, and therein lies the paradox: The statement is false, but that is false, so it must be true. But if the statement is true, it says it is false so it must be false... etc...
    i agree with that thanks k man. The are also hidden habitus (lived environments), which include different languages (french) and dialects (caribean). So this is as well as, and parallel to the subtext mentioned earlier. It goes quite deep, that was the point i was making.

    Like the difference between school and university, is another example.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I understand that numbers can be complex in math, such as e=mc2 or pi or fuzzy logic algo rhythms, but my question is can language also be complex? As in is it possible for somebody to use language in the same way as a mathematician uses complex numbers, with depth and insight, instead of automatically assuming the first gut wrench reaction?!?? interrobang
    I personally don't know how a mathematician uses language to seek a result (other than equations?)

    But if you research the IPA chart, linguistic tree diagrams, truth tables (more about logic), etc etc.

    Language is a complex system to understand and a lot of people often misunderstand it because school doesn't even begin to teach you the systems and interchanging dynamics of linguistics.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I personally don't know how a mathematician uses language to seek a result (other than equations?)

    But if you research the IPA chart, linguistic tree diagrams, truth tables (more about logic), etc etc.

    Language is a complex system to understand and a lot of people often misunderstand it because school doesn't even begin to teach you the systems and interchanging dynamics of linguistics.
    I wasn't saying that a mathematician uses language, i was talking about the very language of maths itself. And how deep it goes. Then flipping this to understand the depth of linguistics and other related fields. (Ergo hegemony). Which also go very deep!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I wasn't saying that a mathematician uses language, i was talking about the very language of maths itself. And how deep it goes. Then flipping this to understand the depth of linguistics and other related fields. (Ergo hegemony). Which also go very deep!
    But isn't Maths a separate language within itself? A lot of mathematicians say yes to this. That's what I meant - not actual ABC; spoken languages haa.

    I don't think maths is used to understand language if that's what you're saying?
 
 
 
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