'Has anyone in your family attended higher education?'

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Abstract_Prism
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Hi guys, I've heard that there's a question like this in the UCAS application forms, and if there is I just wanted to know how I should answer it.

My father attended university, but I haven't had contact with him for about 5 years now and he hasn't played any role in my life since then. Aside from him, no one in my family has attended university.

So how would I answer this question? It would seem a bit unfair to be lumped in the same group as people who were being pushed and prepped for university by parents who both attended university. Thanks.
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greenmang0
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
Hi guys, I've heard that there's a question like this in the UCAS application forms, and if there is I just wanted to know how I should answer it.

My father attended university, but I haven't had contact with him for about 5 years now and he hasn't played any role in my life since then. Aside from him, no one in my family has attended university.

So how would I answer this question? It would seem a bit unfair to be lumped in the same group as people who were being pushed and prepped for university by parents who both attended university. Thanks.
He's part of your family even if you don't have contact with him imo, so I'd definitely say 'yes'. I have a grandparent who attended uni but neither of my parents attended. I still said 'yes'.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
Hi guys, I've heard that there's a question like this in the UCAS application forms, and if there is I just wanted to know how I should answer it.

My father attended university, but I haven't had contact with him for about 5 years now and he hasn't played any role in my life since then. Aside from him, no one in my family has attended university.

So how would I answer this question? It would seem a bit unfair to be lumped in the same group as people who were being pushed and prepped for university by parents who both attended university. Thanks.
That's not the purpose of the question, which is mainly to collect statistical data on the changing pattern of education.
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Pinkberry_y
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
Hi guys, I've heard that there's a question like this in the UCAS application forms, and if there is I just wanted to know how I should answer it.

My father attended university, but I haven't had contact with him for about 5 years now and he hasn't played any role in my life since then. Aside from him, no one in my family has attended university.

So how would I answer this question? It would seem a bit unfair to be lumped in the same group as people who were being pushed and prepped for university by parents who both attended university. Thanks.
You can put anything you want in that question, it doesn't matter and won't affect your application, it's just so every year UCAS can come up with statistics like 20% more students have applied for uni who's family have not had higher education
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username1539513
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
Hi guys, I've heard that there's a question like this in the UCAS application forms, and if there is I just wanted to know how I should answer it.

My father attended university, but I haven't had contact with him for about 5 years now and he hasn't played any role in my life since then. Aside from him, no one in my family has attended university.

So how would I answer this question? It would seem a bit unfair to be lumped in the same group as people who were being pushed and prepped for university by parents who both attended university. Thanks.
Just say yes, it's only for statistics purposes, I believe
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DarkEnergy
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
That's not the purpose of the question, which is mainly to collect statistical data on the changing pattern of education.
Sorry to bring back this post. Can universities see this data on my application?
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by DarkEnergy)
Sorry to bring back this post. Can universities see this data on my application?
No, iirc, they can't.
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Abstract_Prism
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
That's not the purpose of the question, which is mainly to collect statistical data on the changing pattern of education.
This is what it says on UCAS:

'Universities and colleges may have different policies as to if, when and/or how the information may be used. For example, it could be for statistical monitoring purposes after decisions have been made, or it could be used at the application stage to help to provide a fuller picture of an applicant's background. '

I'm concerned that I'll be roped in with the lot who have enjoyed the benefits of having parents who went to university.
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WidgetJones
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You can't go any 'higher'. :dontknow:
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
This is what it says on UCAS:

'Universities and colleges may have different policies as to if, when and/or how the information may be used. For example, it could be for statistical monitoring purposes after decisions have been made, or it could be used at the application stage to help to provide a fuller picture of an applicant's background. '

I'm concerned that I'll be roped in with the lot who have enjoyed the benefits of having parents who went to university.
If they use it to make a decision, it is going to benefit those whose parents did not go to university because the applicant might then fall into a category that is designed to encourage wider participation, but they are not going to reject a good candidate on the basis of their parents' background. You are focusing on something that is not worth even considering worrying about.
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Doones
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
If they use it to make a decision, it is going to benefit those whose parents did not go to university because the applicant might then fall into a category that is designed to encourage wider participation, but they are not going to reject a good candidate on the basis of their parents' background. You are focusing on something that is not worth even considering worrying about.
PRSOM

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Abstract_Prism
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
If they use it to make a decision, it is going to benefit those whose parents did not go to university because the applicant might then fall into a category that is designed to encourage wider participation
This is really what I want to take advantage of. So should I put yes or no for my particular circumstances?
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
This is really what I want to take advantage of. So should I put yes or no for my particular circumstances?
Well, the truth is yes, so put yes. Honesty is always the best policy. I am quite sure if you are a candidate they are interested in, it'd make no difference at all if your entire family were actually working at the university right now or if every single one of them were illiterate.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
This is really what I want to take advantage of. So should I put yes or no for my particular circumstances?
The overwhelming probability is this will not matter, but if it does matter, then giving an incorrect answer will make your application a fraudulent one.
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ageshallnot
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I love the fact that this is a question posed by an aspiring lawyer!
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
I'm concerned that I'll be roped in with the lot who have enjoyed the benefits of having parents who went to university.
And what benefits are those, precisely?
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Tai Ga
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Only my dad who did Law. My mums looking into returning to university though
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Abstract_Prism
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(Original post by Trinculo)
And what benefits are those, precisely?
Well, actually I phrased that wrong.

What I'm really concerned about is not getting the advantages of being the first in your family to go to university.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
I'm concerned that I'll be roped in with the lot who have enjoyed the benefits of having parents who went to university.
There is no logic in that. To be consistent you should not go to university yourself so that your children can be like you.

Alternatively, you can see this as a simple statistical exercise, have some integrity and answer it truthfully and helpfully, and get on with the task of getting yourself in to university so that you can improve both your own life and those of any partner and children you might have.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Abstract_Prism)
Well, actually I phrased that wrong.

What I'm really concerned about is not getting the advantages of being the first in your family to go to university.
Well, as an aspiring law student, you owe it to your own integrity to make the best of what your situation gives you.
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