Study foreign languages as a native speaker?

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    It's a hypothetical question but I couldn't find a definitive answer.
    For example, if I'm German and I apply for German (or joint honours with German) would I be considered?
    Again, I am not planning to do it, but it would be interesting to know.
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    (Original post by scblx)
    It's a hypothetical question but I couldn't find a definitive answer.
    For example, if I'm German and I apply for German (or joint honours with German) would I be considered?
    Again, I am not planning to do it, but it would be interesting to know.
    Probably not.
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    Yes you can, English people study English. Just because its a different language it doesn't make studying it any different.
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    (Original post by safaa7)
    Yes you can, English people study English. Just because its a different language it doesn't make studying it any different.
    Some courses at some universities don't let you study them though if you are a native or have reached a certain level in that language.
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    (Original post by safaa7)
    Yes you can, English people study English. Just because its a different language it doesn't make studying it any different.
    You are mistaken. English speakers who do English degrees are studying the language's literature and linguistics. That is a totally different thing to a language degree. The primary goal of a modern languages degree is to learn how to speak that language, if you're already fluent in German then the chances of a university letting you do a German degree are close to zero.
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    Some universities would allow you to do it, but to substitute some of the language modules for culture modules. I have heard of several cases where native speakers study their own language, usually combined with another language or with a subject from another discipline.
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    Some universities will allow you to do it, and this will usually be stated in their prospectus. Some universities will not allow it under any circumstances.

    It's not as uncommon as you think. Some native speakers choose to study their own language in order to have a more confident command of how the language works, or to be able to teach and work whilst using their foreign language. I know several native speakers who are studying their mother tongue in order to be able to work in the fields of translation, teaching and interpretation, among others. These are skills that cannot be gained simply by being a native speaker of the language- you really need to be able to understand the subtleties of your mother tongue, in order to work professionally. However, there will usually be changes in course content and modules in order to reflect the fact that you are a native speaker.

    It is certainly possible, but you'll need to research each course beforehand in order to check if you can.


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    (Original post by 5845forest)
    Some universities will allow you to do it, and this will usually be stated in their prospectus. Some universities will not allow it under any circumstances.

    It's not as uncommon as you think. Some native speakers choose to study their own language in order to have a more confident command of how the language works, or to be able to teach and work whilst using their foreign language. I know several native speakers who are studying their mother tongue in order to be able to work in the fields of translation, teaching and interpretation, among others. These are skills that cannot be gained simply by being a native speaker of the language- you really need to be able to understand the subtleties of your mother tongue, in order to work professionally. However, there will usually be changes in course content and modules in order to reflect the fact that you are a native speaker.

    It is certainly possible, but you'll need to research each course beforehand in order to check if you can.


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    The only universities I know of that admit native speakers into modern language degrees are Oxford, and to a lesser extent Cambridge (and only if the applicant expresses a strong interest in studying literature). What others are there?
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    UEA and Queen Mary admit native speakers too


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