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    Was not that great at Chemistry at GCSE's, I did Triple science and had little motivation though it might have been due to my crappy teacher who literally taught us nothing except give us worksheets to do - making Chemistry look quite boring. But I want to pursue a scientific career like Bio-medical and heard Chemistry is important.

    Is it more interesting at A-Level or will it be a challenge if done without motivation or work ethic?
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    (Original post by ukila)
    Was not that great at Chemistry at GCSE's, I did Triple science and had little motivation though it might have been due to my crappy teacher who literally taught us nothing except give us worksheets to do - making Chemistry look quite boring. But I want to pursue a scientific career like Bio-medical and heard Chemistry is important.

    Is it more interesting at A-Level or will it be a challenge if done without motivation or work ethic?
    Honestly A-level Chemistry is really hard, I have friends who got and A* at gcse who got D at A-level with a lot of revision.

    I fortunately had a good teacher who i could go to at lunchtimes for help and ran revision sessions. I also enjoy chemistry which motivated me to study. You definitely need a good work ethic to study A-level Chemistry, but also any other A-level.

    It is definitely worth looking at university requirements for any course you are interested in as a lot of Bio-medical courses do require chemistry and if you don't like chemistry that may be an indication that the university course is not for you.
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    (Original post by DibbyDabby)
    Honestly A-level Chemistry is really hard, I have friends who got and A* at gcse who got D at A-level with a lot of revision.

    I fortunately had a good teacher who i could go to at lunchtimes for help and ran revision sessions. I also enjoy chemistry which motivated me to study. You definitely need a good work ethic to study A-level Chemistry, but also any other A-level.

    It is definitely worth looking at university requirements for any course you are interested in as a lot of Bio-medical courses do require chemistry and if you don't like chemistry that may be an indication that the university course is not for you.
    A D with a lot of revision? Now that is scary.
    I would not say I dislike Chemistry, it's just that the way I've been taught at GCSE has not been that favorable in terms of how exciting it is and the practicals were quite tedious due to our school being really unorganized. Though I was hoping I would like it better if I put in the work, as I usually 'dislike' subjects that I'm not that good at and if I really did work my socks off being interested would just come with it.

    I've seen the requirements for the top uni's and they're along the lines of AAA or AAB, which is not too hard I guess but I'm just scared that Chemistry might weigh me down because of how difficult it's said to be.
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    (Original post by ukila)
    Was not that great at Chemistry at GCSE's, I did Triple science and had little motivation though it might have been due to my crappy teacher who literally taught us nothing except give us worksheets to do - making Chemistry look quite boring. But I want to pursue a scientific career like Bio-medical and heard Chemistry is important.

    Is it more interesting at A-Level or will it be a challenge if done without motivation or work ethic?
    It can be quite conceptually challenging at times; I got an A* in GCSE Chemistry and I found a lot of the A2 material to be quite tough. It's interesting, don't get me wrong, but it's tough because you need to learn and understand so much
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    (Original post by ukila)
    A D with a lot of revision? Now that is scary.
    I would not say I dislike Chemistry, it's just that the way I've been taught at GCSE has not been that favorable in terms of how exciting it is and the practicals were quite tedious due to our school being really unorganized. Though I was hoping I would like it better if I put in the work, as I usually 'dislike' subjects that I'm not that good at and if I really did work my socks off being interested would just come with it.

    I've seen the requirements for the top uni's and they're along the lines of AAA or AAB, which is not too hard I guess but I'm just scared that Chemistry might weigh me down because of how difficult it's said to be.
    Not all Biomedicine courses require chemistry A-level but it is strongly recommended. I would suggest before you start you a levels have a quick read through your gcse chemistry stuff, because i found I forgot a lot over summer . Although it is hard , the workload is manageable as long as make good use of your time and any available help.
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    (Original post by ukila)
    Was not that great at Chemistry at GCSE's, I did Triple science and had little motivation though it might have been due to my crappy teacher who literally taught us nothing except give us worksheets to do - making Chemistry look quite boring. But I want to pursue a scientific career like Bio-medical and heard Chemistry is important.

    Is it more interesting at A-Level or will it be a challenge if done without motivation or work ethic?
    I'm not an expert on this but i believe that with any subject you do at A-Level or GCSE, with any university course you choose you will always need a strong work ethic to succeed, and the further you go on with your education the stronger it is going to need to be. Even without any ambition for the subject/course a strong work ethic is always crucial & necessary. Though with that said you have to appreciate that having an ambition for Chemistry compliments work ethic. It's easier to motivate yourself to actually do the work you need to do to get the grade you want, it is very difficult to do so if you lack motivation. For example i want to do a Computer Science course and i am mostly interested in the programming aspects of it. I chose Economics at A-Level and felt that it didn't coincide with my interests, cause of a lack of motivation i ended up with a U. On the other hand i have a brother who got an A in economics at AS Level but from my perception had barely any motivation to do it. Point being it goes both ways, you can be uninspired to do the subject but still maintain a strong work ethic or you could be uninspired and completely tarnish it. Your education is entirely individualistic so it's entirely up to you to get the grade(s) you want.


    Anyway sorry about the rant. Chemistry is definitely complicated when you get to A-Level, as a science i think that is expected, but especially interesting, more so when you do your own research into it. You start to learn about the minor aspects of Quantum Mechanics, some Thermodynamics, some Infra Red Spectroscopy etc, which i personally found interesting. About 7 people took chemistry (All who had A's and A*'s at GCSE) out of about 40 in my class and by mocks we all pretty much ended up with D's and C's. By the actual exam period i moved from a C to a B (79% to be exact which was 1% of the A, so i would basically say i got an A after my AS Level Exam ), as long as you work hard at A-Level and don't doubt yourself (in my opinion that is the greatest threat to your education) you could get a D at GCSE and get an A/A* and vice versa it is always up to you. I feel that Chemistry is closely related to Biology so i think you will undoubtedly find something that interests you. If you don't mind me asking what subjects are you considering?
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    (Original post by ukila)
    Was not that great at Chemistry at GCSE's, I did Triple science and had little motivation though it might have been due to my crappy teacher who literally taught us nothing except give us worksheets to do - making Chemistry look quite boring. But I want to pursue a scientific career like Bio-medical and heard Chemistry is important.

    Is it more interesting at A-Level or will it be a challenge if done without motivation or work ethic?
    Hi OP. Any subject at A-Level will be a serious challenge without motivation and work ethic, so you need to work hard for your A-Levels and also try to pick subjects that you like and/or are good at.

    However, to succeed at A-Level Chemistry it's important that you have a strong grasp of the fundamentals, which you'll learn about in the first unit. This will make it much easier to build upon these fundamentals in the subsequent units and make links between units. You just have to make sure you've got a solid understanding of everything by attending all your classes, paying attention, asking questions, and keeping on top of your work.

    Try to have a look at the option blocks and see if you can rearrange your school timetable to get some decent teachers for your A-Level subjects (that's what I did to avoid being in the class of a notoriously bad Chem teacher at my school). However, you'll be fine if you get a good textbook and work hard. If you're doing Edexcel I strongly recommend the AS and A2 textbooks by George Facer.

    You said you didn't do very well at GCSE. This is ok, just make sure before you start A-Level Chem you're very comfortable with GCSE Chemistry calculations and balancing equations, as well as concepts such as the different types of bonding, dot and cross diagrams, and reactivity.

    Chemistry is definitely far more interesting at A-Level than at GCSE, in my opinion anyway. However, that might not be the case for everyone. If you think you might be interested in learning about: the different factors that influence whether chemicals react together, different pathways to synthesise something and exactly how molecules react together (the transfers of electrons and what manner and order the different bonds break and form etc), rates of reactions and how you might influence them, why different molecules have different shapes and how they may change shape as they react, trends in the periodic table in more depth, amongst other things, then I say go for it.

    Perhaps I'm a tad biased as Chemistry is my favourite subject and I'm about to study it at undergrad level tho lol. Hope this helps you OP.
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    (Original post by Paranoid_Glitch)
    I'm not an expert on this but i believe that with any subject you do at A-Level or GCSE, with any university course you choose you will always need a strong work ethic to succeed, and the further you go on with your education the stronger it is going to need to be. Even without any ambition for the subject/course a strong work ethic is always crucial & necessary. Though with that said you have to appreciate that having an ambition for Chemistry compliments work ethic. It's easier to motivate yourself to actually do the work you need to do to get the grade you want, it is very difficult to do so if you lack motivation. For example i want to do a Computer Science course and i am mostly interested in the programming aspects of it. I chose Economics at A-Level and felt that it didn't coincide with my interests, cause of a lack of motivation i ended up with a U. On the other hand i have a brother who got an A in economics at AS Level but from my perception had barely any motivation to do it. Point being it goes both ways, you can be uninspired to do the subject but still maintain a strong work ethic or you could be uninspired and completely tarnish it. Your education is entirely individualistic so it's entirely up to you to get the grade(s) you want.


    Anyway sorry about the rant. Chemistry is definitely complicated when you get to A-Level, as a science i think that is expected, but especially interesting, more so when you do your own research into it. You start to learn about the minor aspects of Quantum Mechanics, some Thermodynamics, some Infra Red Spectroscopy etc, which i personally found interesting. About 7 people took chemistry (All who had A's and A*'s at GCSE) out of about 40 in my class and by mocks we all pretty much ended up with D's and C's. By the actual exam period i moved from a C to a B (79% to be exact which was 1% of the A, so i would basically say i got an A after my AS Level Exam ), as long as you work hard at A-Level and don't doubt yourself (in my opinion that is the greatest threat to your education) you could get a D at GCSE and get an A/A* and vice versa it is always up to you. I feel that Chemistry is closely related to Biology so i think you will undoubtedly find something that interests you. If you don't mind me asking what subjects are you considering?
    Oh and there is a lot you would have to memorize, like a lot, way more than GCSE.
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    (Original post by Paranoid_Glitch)
    I'm not an expert on this but i believe that with any subject you do at A-Level or GCSE, with any university course you choose you will always need a strong work ethic to succeed, and the further you go on with your education the stronger it is going to need to be. Even without any ambition for the subject/course a strong work ethic is always crucial & necessary. Though with that said you have to appreciate that having an ambition for Chemistry compliments work ethic. It's easier to motivate yourself to actually do the work you need to do to get the grade you want, it is very difficult to do so if you lack motivation. For example i want to do a Computer Science course and i am mostly interested in the programming aspects of it. I chose Economics at A-Level and felt that it didn't coincide with my interests, cause of a lack of motivation i ended up with a U. On the other hand i have a brother who got an A in economics at AS Level but from my perception had barely any motivation to do it. Point being it goes both ways, you can be uninspired to do the subject but still maintain a strong work ethic or you could be uninspired and completely tarnish it. Your education is entirely individualistic so it's entirely up to you to get the grade(s) you want.


    Anyway sorry about the rant. Chemistry is definitely complicated when you get to A-Level, as a science i think that is expected, but especially interesting, more so when you do your own research into it. You start to learn about the minor aspects of Quantum Mechanics, some Thermodynamics, some Infra Red Spectroscopy etc, which i personally found interesting. About 7 people took chemistry (All who had A's and A*'s at GCSE) out of about 40 in my class and by mocks we all pretty much ended up with D's and C's. By the actual exam period i moved from a C to a B (79% to be exact which was 1% of the A, so i would basically say i got an A after my AS Level Exam ), as long as you work hard at A-Level and don't doubt yourself (in my opinion that is the greatest threat to your education) you could get a D at GCSE and get an A/A* and vice versa it is always up to you. I feel that Chemistry is closely related to Biology so i think you will undoubtedly find something that interests you. If you don't mind me asking what subjects are you considering?
    I'm considering Chem, Biology and possibly Economics. Also, I agree that doubting yourself will thwart you; hopefully I can have more consistent motivation for A-Levels, because at GCSE's I was practically a mess.

    About the 7 people in your class ending up with D's and C's in my school it is a similar story - to the extent that my Chemistry teacher used this as a reason to discourage us from taking up the subject (he showed us their results).

    I'm also hoping I will be more interested in it when I become more invested in it and begin grasping ideas and generally being amazed.
 
 
 
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