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Does it look bad if you've had a lot of different jobs in different sectors? Watch

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    Asking because I'm one of those people who just doesn't know what to do in life, and I feel like I'm going to end up hopping around career sectors until I find something I want to stick with.

    I'm a 24 year old graduate. I'm an A-Level teacher. I don't want to stay in this job and I'm the kind of person who has LOTS of little interests rather than a couple of really big ones, so when it comes to thinking of an alternative I don't really know what to do.

    I'm worried if I try different jobs it will get to a point where my CV just screams indecisive, but I don't know what else to do :/
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    curious to see this aswell
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Asking because I'm one of those people who just doesn't know what to do in life, and I feel like I'm going to end up hopping around career sectors until I find something I want to stick with.

    I'm a 24 year old graduate. I'm an A-Level teacher. I don't want to stay in this job and I'm the kind of person who has LOTS of little interests rather than a couple of really big ones, so when it comes to thinking of an alternative I don't really know what to do.

    I'm worried if I try different jobs it will get to a point where my CV just screams indecisive, but I don't know what else to do :/
    Not if you are working in retail, manual work, or a role that has no progression. Very harmful if you are trying to get into something that the employer sees as progressive. You'll forever be doing entry level roles.

    That's not as dire as it seems, plenty of people (especially women) have fulfilling careers doing jobs they 'fall into' as administrators and in retail. Retail doesn't have to = faceless high street checkout, there are lots of quaint/boutique shops out there. Ditto lots of interesting businesses to help in the back office. But basically, if you don't pick a specific role, or a specific sector, or some combination of the twe, then you are always going to live by serendipity and your network, because you aren't going to build an incremental skill set to go from, as an example, an HR Clerk to a Director of HR.

    Constantly moving jobs every 2 years or less and changing sectors becomes an issue after about 3 changes/6 years. No matter how good you are, employers will invariably, when down to the final 2, go with the candidate 'with a more stable/consistent/conventional' background.

    You have to deal with the fact that either you will gain employment via serendipity and your network, or you need to stick at something. The something doesn't have to be a single job, but it needs to be an incremental series of coherent steps within a skill set (HR clerk in a university, HR Officer in a car manufacturer > Senior HR specialist in a paint factory etc) or a job type/sector (A level teacher > overseas teacher > Head of Sixth Form teacher etc)

    You may have many interests, but you won't be acquiring equally diverse, and strong skill sets for employment by moving around. Basically you can have breadth or depth, and conventional employers prefer to play safe with depth of experience.
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    Experience is experience. Sector hopping has its advantages. You can build a wide range of transferable skill sets. The trick is to sell those transferable skills when sidestepping into an alternative sector and tailor your CV according to the most relevant past experience for the sector you are applying.

    Eventually you will find your niche and your wide experience won't hold you back at all.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Asking because I'm one of those people who just doesn't know what to do in life, and I feel like I'm going to end up hopping around career sectors until I find something I want to stick with.

    I'm a 24 year old graduate. I'm an A-Level teacher. I don't want to stay in this job and I'm the kind of person who has LOTS of little interests rather than a couple of really big ones, so when it comes to thinking of an alternative I don't really know what to do.

    I'm worried if I try different jobs it will get to a point where my CV just screams indecisive, but I don't know what else to do :/
    I was in the very same situation as you. I graduated from university 2 years ago and since then I have been job hopping in different sectors. Like the above post said you have to use a technique to get round that, it worked for me and now I'm not 'hopping' different jobs anymore.
 
 
 
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