LSE law 2017

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    Hey everyone I realise this is quite early but this has been weighing on my mind for quite a bit. I created this so we could chat about grades, PS & the application process. Quote with your GCSE grades, AS grades, and predicted A2 grades.

    GCSE: 2A*s 2As 6Bs 1C (I had completely different career path. Can you believe I wanted to be on broadway lol & even applied to a theatre college)

    AS Grades: ABBC (The B in English lit was one mark off an A, and so was the C in government and politics) Bit gutted that my teacher wont remark English lit (as it's new spec and by carrying on this year the grade becomes irrelevant) but still would be nice to say I got an A in English lit. I've never gotten lower than an A before so..

    Predicted A2 grades: A*AA (my RE grade was my highest ofc at an A but it was a strong A at 168 UMS. I'm quite sure my teacher will predict me the A* & I heard LSE Law don't look at UMS.) I'm sure of an A off my English teacher, and an A off my history teacher (I was about 3/4 marks off an A so pretty close)

    Added info: Mini pupillage at a civil chambers for a week, finished a poetry book, volunteered in Nigeria as a teaching assistant, work at my sixth form newspaper & my church magazine. (Might be interning at a solicitors firm in October so there's that too.)
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    Hi I've also been thinking loads about uni but I'm scared i won't get in as most require A*AA which i doubt I'm gonna get predicted

    For GCSE i got 2A*s 9As and as AS i got ABBC too but all of my grades were in the middle of the boundary so i need to do really get convincing my teachers! I think overall i will get predicted AAA

    I was looking at Warwick as the entry requirements are slightly lower that may change as my economics teacher likes me so i may be able to sway him to predict A*

    Also has anyone been thinking about the LNAT??
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    (Original post by stekrose)
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    (Original post by Georgia.C.)
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    I might as well post here for encouragement. I'll be starting my Law degree in two weeks' time at LSE, so ask me anything you'd like about the applications process
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I might as well post here for encouragement. I'll be starting my Law degree in two weeks' time at LSE, so ask me anything you'd like about the applications process
    Hey, that's wonderful! Congratulations!
    Would there be any LSE specific advice you'd be able to give? or any possible things prospective applicants should keep in mind?
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    Aren't your AS weak?

    ABBC???? 168 ums isn't really a strong A. To be confident of getting an A* wouldn't you need 180 ums
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    (Original post by ibprocrastinator)
    Hey, that's wonderful! Congratulations!
    Would there be any LSE specific advice you'd be able to give? or any possible things prospective applicants should keep in mind?
    Warning: massive post

    I really can't think of anything too specific to LSE, other than making sure that you have good extracurriculars that are mentioned in your P.S. and tied in somehow to Law. These, for example, could be being a member of your school debating/MUN/EYP club. In addition, there's plenty you could do that relates directly to the subject. Since I'm guessing that it's gonna be hard for you to find work experience from this point onward, you could still go along to your local country court on weekends and keep track of a couple of cases, or pick up a few books to read before finishing your personal statement and mentioning what you thought about them/learnt from them.

    I found these four being suggested on LSE's website ages ago:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    J Adams and R Brownsword Understanding Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 2006)
    T Bingham The Rule of Law (2011, Penguin Books)
    A Bradney et al How to Study Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 2005)
    C Gearty Can Human Rights Survive? (Cambridge UP, 2006)
    I read through the last one (by Gearty, who's at LSE), which can be found as a free PDF online.

    Then, of course, you could look at a legal issue in your EPQ (which I presume has been started already), and again mention what you learnt from it in your P.S. I've even heard of people volunteering in legal clinics (not doing any legal work, just administrative/secretarial stuff) in Year 12.

    I think the key thing to remember is that LSE puts a lot of weight on P.S.s because it has so little else to go on, so really scrutinising it and making sure it's of a top standard is vital. Students on TSR go on a lot about "good personal statements" without necessarily acknowledging that the best ones are evidence-based and have a lot of hard stuff behind the wishy washy "why I want to study xyz". While it's too late for many to get work experience/start an EPQ/rack up any particular achievements in some extracurricular, there's still a lot that can be done in a couple of months (assuming you aren't also applying to Oxbridge).

    I have very limited information on grades, but I've spoken to people who have gotten in with a B or two in GCSE, albeit with their other grades being A*s (one girl I spoke to on Offer Holders' Day had 9A*s 1B 1C for example). However, do keep in mind that the average Law student there got 531-574 UCAS points at A-level/IB (depending on whether you're looking at the CUG or the Guardian rankings), so showing that you can reach grades like that is a definite bonus. For context, an A*A*AA at A2, with an additional B at AS level (which is what I ended up getting this year), was 570 UCAS points under the old UCAS tariff system. This page breaks down what LSE LLB undergrads achieved last year.

    How can you show that? Having a solid history of top grades (at GCSE/AS), that can be used to support the case for an equally good set of A2 predicted grades Of course, there will be exemptions to this rule for people with extenuating circumstances or really exceptional P.S.s, but the better your grades are, the higher your chances! How low your grades can be without you being rejected depends on the cohort you're being assessed against and the number of offers the admissions team is willing to give out. Also, keep in mind that you don't have to provide UMS, even though they will obviously see your AS module grades (if available).
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Warning: massive post

    I really can't think of anything too specific to LSE, other than making sure that you have good extracurriculars that are mentioned in your P.S. and tied in somehow to Law. These, for example, could be being a member of your school debating/MUN/EYP club. In addition, there's plenty you could do that relates directly to the subject. Since I'm guessing that it's gonna be hard for you to find work experience from this point onward, you could still go along to your local country court on weekends and keep track of a couple of cases, or pick up a few books to read before finishing your personal statement and mentioning what you thought about them/learnt from them.

    I found these four being suggested on LSE's website ages ago:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    J Adams and R Brownsword Understanding Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 2006)
    T Bingham The Rule of Law (2011, Penguin Books)
    A Bradney et al How to Study Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 2005)
    C Gearty Can Human Rights Survive? (Cambridge UP, 2006)
    I read through the last one (by Gearty, who's at LSE), which can be found as a free PDF online.

    Then, of course, you could look at a legal issue in your EPQ (which I presume has been started already), and again mention what you learnt from it in your P.S. I've even heard of people volunteering in legal clinics (not doing any legal work, just administrative/secretarial stuff) in Year 12.

    I think the key thing to remember is that LSE puts a lot of weight on P.S.s because it has so little else to go on, so really scrutinising it and making sure it's of a top standard is vital. Students on TSR go on a lot about "good personal statements" without necessarily acknowledging that the best ones are evidence-based and have a lot of hard stuff behind the wishy washy "why I want to study xyz". While it's too late for many to get work experience/start an EPQ/rack up any particular achievements in some extracurricular, there's still a lot that can be done in a couple of months (assuming you aren't also applying to Oxbridge).

    I have very limited information on grades, but I've spoken to people who have gotten in with a B or two in GCSE, albeit with their other grades being A*s (one girl I spoke to on Offer Holders' Day had 9A*s 1B 1C for example). However, do keep in mind that the average Law student there got 531-574 UCAS points at A-level/IB (depending on whether you're looking at the CUG or the Guardian rankings), so showing that you can reach grades like that is a definite bonus. For context, an A*A*AA at A2, with an additional B at AS level (which is what I ended up getting this year), was 570 UCAS points under the old UCAS tariff system. This page breaks down what LSE LLB undergrads achieved last year.

    How can you show that? Having a solid history of top grades (at GCSE/AS), that can be used to support the case for an equally good set of A2 predicted grades Of course, there will be exemptions to this rule for people with extenuating circumstances or really exceptional P.S.s, but the better your grades are, the higher your chances! How low your grades can be without you being rejected depends on the cohort you're being assessed against and the number of offers the admissions team is willing to give out. Also, keep in mind that you don't have to provide UMS, even though they will obviously see your AS module grades (if available).
    Hi, would you mind me asking what your as results were?
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    (Original post by Georgia.C.)
    Hi, would you mind me asking what your as results were?
    AAAAB (B in Further Maths)
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    Thinking of applying but still complaining about my IG results since I crammed the night before the exams lmao!

    IGCSE: A*ABBBBBC
    IB1: 38 points (without core points)
    IB2 Predicted: 40 points
    Activities: MUN / UNESCO / Prefect / Antibullying committee / etc..
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I might as well post here for encouragement. I'll be starting my Law degree in two weeks' time at LSE, so ask me anything you'd like about the applications process
    Congratulations. Enjoy your ride.
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    (Original post by citibankrec)
    Aren't your AS weak?

    ABBC???? 168 ums isn't really a strong A. To be confident of getting an A* wouldn't you need 180 ums
    Yeah they aren't as great as I expected. But a friend who had the same grades at AS got into the same course. and getting 180 UMS at AS is essentially getting the grade? In my case I want to be predicted higher. And yeah 168 UMS is a pretty solid A. An A is 160 UMS.
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    (Original post by stekrose)
    Yeah they aren't as great as I expected. But a friend who had the same grades at AS got into the same course. and getting 180 UMS at AS is essentially getting the grade? In my case I want to be predicted higher. And yeah 168 UMS is a pretty solid A. An A is 160 UMS.

    Hello, I'm a student entering into year 12. I was wondering whether Biology, Chemistry and Geography are suitable choices for Law at LSE or Oxford. If so, I would like to know any precautions for the year ahead and how to prepare. I know I need to sit the LNAT. I was also thinking of work experience. How should I also prepare for my personal statement, since this is crucially important for LSE? I got 2A* and 7A at GCSE
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    (Original post by ammad14)
    Hello, I'm a student entering into year 12. I was wondering whether Biology, Chemistry and Geography are suitable choices for Law at LSE or Oxford. If so, I would like to know any precautions for the year ahead and how to prepare. I know I need to sit the LNAT. I was also thinking of work experience. How should I also prepare for my personal statement, since this is crucially important for LSE? I got 2A* and 7A at GCSE
    Hi sorry for the late reply. A lot of universities like students that have varied backgrounds but be sure to have a fourth a level as LSE generally have students applying that do. I would say maybe have a subject that is more essay based? I did geography at GCSE level and it wasn't heavily based on extended pieces of writing, I don't know if this changes at A level but be sure to ask your teachers. Ultimately try and strive for the best possible grades now. Your GCSEs are quite strong as well so be proud of that.

    I wouldn't start worrying about LNAT right now, wait for the summer time.
    But my advice would be to just try and practice it, there's no point trying to "revise" or "study" because its an aptitude test. Yes, personal statement is crucially important! In my opinion even more important than your grades, for top universities sometimes it is the difference between acceptance and rejection, make sure you have work experience! Valid work experience is great (apply to the social mobility foundation they have great law experience opportunities) and also non traditional is liked, so working at a golf course perhaps, or as admin in a gym; it brings a sense of realism to your character. Try though to relate everything to law, your skills etc.
    However don't worry too much about this yet, focus on your school work and doing the best you can.

    If possible try and attend summer schools, it's something unfortunately I couldn't do but it does help. I've heard of people that attended summer schools for Durham and were offered a place because of it. If you have the money and the requirements attend LSE's summer school if you can, or any other summer school that has a law program.

    Hope this helps.
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    Hi I'm also applying for a law degree 2017 in LSE. I'll be submitting my application most probably within this month or next, and I've known that LSE does email applicants about the 'notice period' (i.e. number of weeks) if we are further considered. Does anyone know what is the standard notice period issued by LSE?

    I'm applying with the following grades:
    AS: AAAA (achieved)
    A2: A*A*A*A (achieved)

    Thank you for your kind response.
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    I'm applying to LSE for Law too and hope to have submitted by UCAS form by the end of the week!

    GCSE: AAAAABBBBBC
    AS: AAAB(Eng Lit, History, IT, RS respectively)
    A2 Predictions: A*(Hist) A*(IT) A (Eng Lit)

    Also applying to Queen Mary, Exeter, Cardiff and Liverpool
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    Thanks for the reply

    I will definitely consider summer schools. Another question I have is, graduates of Law from LSE and Oxford, have they ever gone on to do investment banking. I know there isn't a particular degree for investment banking analysts but they usually hire those with the maths based subjects. So I was wondering is it possible to do investment banking with a Law degree from Oxford or LSE and has it been done before?
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    (Original post by ammad14)
    Thanks for the reply

    I will definitely consider summer schools. Another question I have is, graduates of Law from LSE and Oxford, have they ever gone on to do investment banking. I know there isn't a particular degree for investment banking analysts but they usually hire those with the maths based subjects. So I was wondering is it possible to do investment banking with a Law degree from Oxford or LSE and has it been done before?
    Your welcome. Yes it's very common among those that come from Oxbridge or top Unis like LSE, UCL or KCL with non maths degrees. However if you do want to do investment banking I would say do maths related subjects anyway just because if there's someone that has a economics degree from UCL/Warwick and you have a Law degree from LSE or Oxbridge in my express opinion they might take the person with the economics degree. However it does matter where you apply to, some firms are super picky about your university and will take you based on where you go, others care more about the background knowledge and skills you've gained.

    Have you looked into the investment banking career? It's not a single post, there are different positions; if you want to get the highest paid position and the more mathematically inclined work do maths, if not I think you'll be stuck with some analysing and basic stuff if you go into Law at uni.
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    (Original post by stekrose)
    Your welcome. Yes it's very common among those that come from Oxbridge or top Unis like LSE, UCL or KCL with non maths degrees. However if you do want to do investment banking I would say do maths related subjects anyway just because if there's someone that has a economics degree from UCL/Warwick and you have a Law degree from LSE or Oxbridge in my express opinion they might take the person with the economics degree. However it does matter where you apply to, some firms are super picky about your university and will take you based on where you go, others care more about the background knowledge and skills you've gained.

    Have you looked into the investment banking career? It's not a single post, there are different positions; if you want to get the highest paid position and the more mathematically inclined work do maths, if not I think you'll be stuck with some analysing and basic stuff if you go into Law at uni.

    Thanks. I've had a look and a read around and it seems interesting in mostly the front office type jobs. I never picked maths because I don't feel I'm good enough at it do it A level. I think Law is a good option and it's good money but I'm honestly undecided on what career I want to do.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I might as well post here for encouragement. I'll be starting my Law degree in two weeks' time at LSE, so ask me anything you'd like about the applications process
    Hi John,

    Congratulations on your offer and hope you will enjoy your life in LSE! I'm an international applicant planning to apply to LSE for law. As i'm concerned, LSE does email applicants about the 'waiting period' (i.e. how many weeks) if we are further considered in the pool. By any chance, do you know what is the standard waiting period for usual applicants?

    Also, I will be applying with the following grades:
    AS: AAAA (achieved)
    A2: A*A*A*A (achieved)

    Thank you for your kind attention.
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    (Original post by Heheboy)
    Hi John,Congratulations on your offer and hope you will enjoy your life in LSE! I'm an international applicant planning to apply to LSE for law. As i'm concerned, LSE does email applicants about the 'waiting period' (i.e. how many weeks) if we are further considered in the pool. By any chance, do you know what is the standard waiting period for usual applicants?Also, I will be applying with the following grades:AS: AAAA (achieved)A2: A*A*A*A (achieved)Thank you for your kind attention.
    Your grades should be more than fine - I actually got almost identical ones to you

    I had a post on TSR about six months ago which gave details for all the emails LSE sends you, but I can't seem to find it...

    From what I remember, they send you an email confirming that they've received your application. After two weeks, provided you meet the minimum requirements for your course and aren't completely rubbish, you'll get an email saying that they will decide in up to eight weeks. During these weeks, you can get rejected (usually on Thursdays) or be accepted (usually on Fridays), even though most offers will be made towards the end of the period and to the best students (apparently, admissions work down a ranking of applicants in each cohort). Last year, we got an extension email the Monday after the eighth week is over saying that they needed another four weeks to decide (this was due to LSE downscaling the admissions team). If you haven't heard by the end of the fourth week, they may ask you for another couple of weeks extension, but that doesn't happen that often - only if you sent in your application close to the deadline.

    I'd say that, for Law, you'd be expecting an offer around December-January (I got one on the 27th of Jan, and there were plenty of students who got one after me), even though I know someone who got hers in late November.

    Edit: To summarise, it went something like 2+8+4(+2) weeks since your school sent off your application.
 
 
 
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