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    Hello everyone,

    I have just graduated from Oxford with a 2:1 in English Literature and am looking at getting into investment banking or investment management. I was wondering if anyone knew of the steps I should take and how to get an internship. Are there any non-summer internships or are they all in the summer?

    Does anyone have any suggestions for the best job to get in order to get a summer internship?


    Any other thoughts or suggestions? I would like any help I could get on the best way forward from here.

    Many thanks.
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    Also, thoughts on MBAs. Are they worth it?

    (Original post by SW8636Ox)
    Hello everyone,

    I have just graduated from Oxford with a 2:1 in English Literature and am looking at getting into investment banking or investment management. I was wondering if anyone knew of the steps I should take and how to get an internship. Are there any non-summer internships or are they all in the summer?

    Does anyone have any suggestions for the best job to get in order to get a summer internship?


    Any other thoughts or suggestions? I would like any help I could get on the best way forward from here.

    Many thanks.
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    (Original post by SW8636Ox)
    Also, thoughts on MBAs. Are they worth it?
    I'm sadly no expert on investment banking, but I just wanted to say good luck! You can definitely get into it with an English degree! It's so good to hear of a fellow humanities student going into IB; it just shows what nonsense the STEM Nazis peddle on here.

    My brother's in the year below you at LMH doing History and Politics, and he's planning on going into investment banking too. Any advice for him for the final year?

    Hope it goes well!

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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    I'm sadly no expert on investment banking, but I just wanted to say good luck! You can definitely get into it with an English degree! It's so good to hear of a fellow humanities student going into IB; it just shows what nonsense the STEM Nazis peddle on here.

    My brother's in the year below you at LMH doing History and Politics, and he's planning on going into investment banking too. Any advice for him for the final year?

    Hope it goes well!

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    I guess apply for internships early. I regret it now, heavily. *sigh*
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    Get in contact with all the investment banking firms in London: go on google and Google investment banking firms in London and make a list of all of them. Then email them, look at their careers section on their website, phone their HR department. Contact the really small firms and the big firms, anything and anyone! Even if it means that you're applying for next summer or for next January then do that! Then in the meantime do another job until then
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    (Original post by SW8636Ox)
    I guess apply for internships early. I regret it now, heavily. *sigh*
    I meant for the exams mainly! You could also take a masters degree to buy yourself more time. Take a read of this from targetjobs:


    A number of investment banks and investment management businesses don’t just accept candidates without a finance degree – they actively encourage them to apply. A common theme is not wanting to recruit an entire intake of economics-graduate clones.

    Gemma Adams, vice-president of recruitment at Mitsubishi UJF Securities international, explains: ‘We don’t want a class that is a complete carbon copy of one another, so I don’t want 20 students who have all achieved a first at a red-brick university in economics. That just isn’t how we work here. We want a really diverse class, we want people that have opinions, are happy to argue a point, to put their hand up in a meeting, challenge our CEO.’

    The Citi recruitment team is keen to state that graduates can ‘apply to any business area from any degree discipline’ and that the bank needs ‘a diverse range of people from different backgrounds’. Jane Clark, head of campus recruitment at Barclays, agrees on the need for diversity, adding ‘We focus on educating people so they understand that they don’t necessarily need to have a financial degree background.’

    Edinburgh-based investment management firm Baillie Gifford is well known for taking a long view of the financial markets, and as such is particularly keen to recruit arts and humanities graduates for their broader approach towards culture and society. HR manager Richard Barry comments: ‘The firm looks for graduates who can think freely and in a structured way, and who can follow up their interests with considered, well-formulated arguments. Any degree background that develops the ability to do this is an advantage.’

    Fellow investment management firm M&G Investments said it 'positively encourages candidates from all backgrounds to apply, as they bring a different way of thinking to the typical economics or finance graduates'. The organisation adds that it wouldn’t expect candidates to have relevant internships and those who haven't gained experience in the industry would not be at a disadvantage during the recruitment process.
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    (Original post by SW8636Ox)
    Also, thoughts on MBAs. Are they worth it?
    MBAs are only for people who have at least a couple years of experience, it would be pretty much pointless to do one directly after graduating. Alternatively, if you have the means and want to defer applying to all this stuff for a bit, maybe taking a gap year this year to apply to masters programmes could be a way forward, especially so if as I hinted at below, if you didn't much at uni at all.

    You haven't really told us anything about what you did at uni or how you spent your non uni work time, the Oxford degree alone isn't going to help.

    But as to getting in, you literally have the world's best network at your doorstep - speak to some of your current classmates heading into finance about what different firms look for and how best you should prepare for applications. Use linkedin, reach out to some recent grad Oxons. Do some legwork. Read a bit about which division in particular you want to apply to and why - IB as a sector is pretty massive.

    Apart from that, yeah, there are off cycle internship programmes and some banks take on recent grads into their summer internship schemes, so after the prep work, you'd just have to apply. If you're aiming for front office divisions, it would be virtually impossible to land a grad position at any of the big banks without prior direct internship experience (smaller elite boutique banks, if IBD/Advisory is your chosen area anyway, are more lenient as well as the independent investment managers). Strategy consulting firms are also fairly open for their grad positions.

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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    I meant for the exams mainly! But you don't need an internship by any means, especially if you went to Oxford - you could also take a masters degree to buy yourself more time. Take a read of this from targetjobs:


    A number of investment banks and investment management businesses don’t just accept candidates without a finance degree – they actively encourage them to apply. A common theme is not wanting to recruit an entire intake of economics-graduate clones.

    Gemma Adams, vice-president of recruitment at Mitsubishi UJF Securities international, explains: ‘We don’t want a class that is a complete carbon copy of one another, so I don’t want 20 students who have all achieved a first at a red-brick university in economics. That just isn’t how we work here. We want a really diverse class, we want people that have opinions, are happy to argue a point, to put their hand up in a meeting, challenge our CEO.’

    The Citi recruitment team is keen to state that graduates can ‘apply to any business area from any degree discipline’ and that the bank needs ‘a diverse range of people from different backgrounds’. Jane Clark, head of campus recruitment at Barclays, agrees on the need for diversity, adding ‘We focus on educating people so they understand that they don’t necessarily need to have a financial degree background.’

    Edinburgh-based investment management firm Baillie Gifford is well known for taking a long view of the financial markets, and as such is particularly keen to recruit arts and humanities graduates for their broader approach towards culture and society. HR manager Richard Barry comments: ‘The firm looks for graduates who can think freely and in a structured way, and who can follow up their interests with considered, well-formulated arguments. Any degree background that develops the ability to do this is an advantage.’

    Fellow investment management firm M&G Investments said it 'positively encourages candidates from all backgrounds to apply, as they bring a different way of thinking to the typical economics or finance graduates'. The organisation adds that it wouldn’t expect candidates to have relevant internships and those who haven't gained experience in the industry would not be at a disadvantage during the recruitment process.
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    OP definitely would need an internship and it would help if you didn't repost the same stuff and rather just provided a link.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    OP definitely would need an internship and it would help if you didn't repost the same stuff and rather just provided a link.

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    :confused:No it wouldn't - the whole article is long, this is the relevant extract.

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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    :confused:No it wouldn't - the whole article is long, this is the relevant extract.

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    The whole article would make for a better read tbh.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The whole article would make for a better read tbh.

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    You may well be right

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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    I meant for the exams mainly! But you don't need an internship by any means, especially if you went to Oxford - you could also take a masters degree to buy yourself more time. Take a read of this from targetjobs:


    A number of investment banks and investment management businesses don’t just accept candidates without a finance degree – they actively encourage them to apply. A common theme is not wanting to recruit an entire intake of economics-graduate clones.

    Gemma Adams, vice-president of recruitment at Mitsubishi UJF Securities international, explains: ‘We don’t want a class that is a complete carbon copy of one another, so I don’t want 20 students who have all achieved a first at a red-brick university in economics. That just isn’t how we work here. We want a really diverse class, we want people that have opinions, are happy to argue a point, to put their hand up in a meeting, challenge our CEO.’

    The Citi recruitment team is keen to state that graduates can ‘apply to any business area from any degree discipline’ and that the bank needs ‘a diverse range of people from different backgrounds’. Jane Clark, head of campus recruitment at Barclays, agrees on the need for diversity, adding ‘We focus on educating people so they understand that they don’t necessarily need to have a financial degree background.’

    Edinburgh-based investment management firm Baillie Gifford is well known for taking a long view of the financial markets, and as such is particularly keen to recruit arts and humanities graduates for their broader approach towards culture and society. HR manager Richard Barry comments: ‘The firm looks for graduates who can think freely and in a structured way, and who can follow up their interests with considered, well-formulated arguments. Any degree background that develops the ability to do this is an advantage.’

    Fellow investment management firm M&G Investments said it 'positively encourages candidates from all backgrounds to apply, as they bring a different way of thinking to the typical economics or finance graduates'. The organisation adds that it wouldn’t expect candidates to have relevant internships and those who haven't gained experience in the industry would not be at a disadvantage during the recruitment process.
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    you need an internship buddy
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    you need an internship buddy
    Most people get internships from programs though that they underwent during AS or A2 level of study, typically from the same banks.
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    (Original post by Vl7d)
    Most people get internships from programs though that they underwent during AS or A2 level of study, typically from the same banks.
    Huh? Source?

    Not everyone does insights..

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Huh? Source?

    Not everyone does insights..

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    Cannot source but this is conducted from quite some research. I will just say that those with insights are at a much higher advantage than those without. No source needed for this because common sense should prevail here. Also quant degrees are most definitely the preference (Finance, economics, maths, engineering, physics) as opposed to degrees such as English something.
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    (Original post by Vl7d)
    Cannot source but this is conducted from quite some research. I will just say that those with insights are at a much higher advantage than those without. No source needed for this because common sense should prevail here. Also quant degrees are most definitely the preference (Finance, economics, maths, engineering, physics) as opposed to degrees such as English something.
    agree with the latter but would replace a levels with 1st year uni Spring weeks, maybe getting spring weeks is more attributable to the a levels comment.
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    (Original post by Vl7d)
    Cannot source but this is conducted from quite some research. I will just say that those with insights are at a much higher advantage than those without. No source needed for this because common sense should prevail here. Also quant degrees are most definitely the preference (Finance, economics, maths, engineering, physics) as opposed to degrees such as English something.
    You're research is pretty lacking unfortunately, the reason for the latter is sampling bias not what is 'preferred'. And insight days aren't the be all nor end all of anything - as gr8wiz said, a non-insignficant amount convert their spring weeks so will be back at the same bank.*

    Ofc this has naff all to do with the OP's situation.*
 
 
 
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