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    I'm having a bit of a mid-course crisis

    To tell you a bit about myself: Ive always wanted to be a vet, started my work experience aged 14, applied with about 30weeks, got an offer from my first choice, got my grades and went. Breezed through first year. Second year I really struggled with medical issues and ended up with 6 resits in summer, as well as still trying to complete my ems. Failed 2, and resat second year. Now I'm in third year and have just resat the majority of my exams this summer. I aced all written projects and dissertation coming out almost top of the year. I just can't sit exams anymore.

    I understand I'm not stupid. But I've lost all confidence in myself, and all passion for the course. I know I haven't put the work into these resits and I think I'll have to resit a year again. I just don't have the motivation to get out of bed and study. I don't ever see a situation where I will know everything I need to, to make a good vet. I think part of the problem is first year was now so long ago, I don't remember any of the basics, so then struggle with stuff now? I've been knocked down so many times now, and I realise I only have myself to blame for lack of work... So do I just give up if my hearts not in it? Because I don't know what else I'd do with my life if I leave now (with four years debt and nothing to show for it).

    Any advice welcome - whether it be someone that's been through this and found a way to the end of the course... Or someone who was brave enough to leave and find happiness beyond vet school...

    Plz help xoxox
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    (Original post by Traytray)
    I'm having a bit of a mid-course crisis

    To tell you a bit about myself: Ive always wanted to be a vet, started my work experience aged 14, applied with about 30weeks, got an offer from my first choice, got my grades and went. Breezed through first year. Second year I really struggled with medical issues and ended up with 6 resits in summer, as well as still trying to complete my ems. Failed 2, and resat second year. Now I'm in third year and have just resat the majority of my exams this summer. I aced all written projects and dissertation coming out almost top of the year. I just can't sit exams anymore.

    I understand I'm not stupid. But I've lost all confidence in myself, and all passion for the course. I know I haven't put the work into these resits and I think I'll have to resit a year again. I just don't have the motivation to get out of bed and study. I don't ever see a situation where I will know everything I need to, to make a good vet. I think part of the problem is first year was now so long ago, I don't remember any of the basics, so then struggle with stuff now? I've been knocked down so many times now, and I realise I only have myself to blame for lack of work... So do I just give up if my hearts not in it? Because I don't know what else I'd do with my life if I leave now (with four years debt and nothing to show for it).

    Any advice welcome - whether it be someone that's been through this and found a way to the end of the course... Or someone who was brave enough to leave and find happiness beyond vet school...

    Plz help xoxox
    I had similar issues in my first couple of years of vet school.

    I resat 2/4 modules in first year and 4/4 modules in second year. I actually failed one of my resits in second year (on a technicality as well!) which culminated in me being expelled from vet school. I will never forget the man who told me my career was over, I would never be a vet, "don't do anything stupid" and "check out the career's office on the way out".

    Needless to say that wasn't the end of my veterinary career.

    With me it wasn't a single issue. I was burnt out from what was going on at home and the exam regime, bored and demotivated with the academic work, and what little revision I did wasn't "efficient" (or "productive" for a better word).

    I had to fight to get back on the course but a big part of that was taking a long hard look at what I really wanted to do and what would I do if I wasn't a vet. The grass is always greener, but when I was realistic about the options available I kept coming back to veterinary science. Knuckling down with the academic modules was a necessary evil until I could get to the more practical side (eg; clinical EMS, rotations/clerking) that I enjoyed and always excelled at.

    Once back onto the course I had to change the way I revised. Instead of rereading and rewriting my notes I started meeting up with one of my friends once every 1-2 weeks throughout term, normally in a nice coffee shop, to work through past paper questions or talk through aspects of the syllabus we struggled with. Having a friend there helped improve my discipline and we'd set targets for working through the syllabus. Then when at home I'd use flashcards or past paper questions to test myself.

    As far as quantity of revision went I did do slightly more but it was more spread out (ie; a 1-2 hours a week) rather than leaving it to the last week before exams. Similarly in the immediate run up to exams I would maybe do 4-6 hours a day interspersed with tv/film/gym breaks and normally take the night off before an exam to decompress.

    It may sound counterintuitive but I got my best results through this - no further resits and even some good grades behind me (a couple of merits and a distinction). Sure it was always hard but with time you learn to adapt to the stress.

    You can do it.

    Unfortunately vet school is very academically biased, in selection, teaching and examining whether you are fit to practice at the end of it all. This favours some people more than others. However, when you graduate the opposite is often true, most employers select for practical and vocational skills.

    Anecdotally most of the resit students I know found it easier to get a job and are further along in their career than the more academic graduates.

    Fast forward several years...I have a good job, I train junior vets and student nurses, and I am a significant way through a fully sponsored postgrad certificate. Not bad for a "borderline" student.
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    You don't think you have it in you but the school accepted you for a reason. If you leave you'll look back with happy thoughts, just try get through it
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I had similar issues in my first couple of years of vet school.

    I resat 2/4 modules in first year and 4/4 modules in second year. I actually failed one of my resits in second year (on a technicality as well!) which culminated in me being expelled from vet school. I will never forget the man who told me my career was over, I would never be a vet, "don't do anything stupid" and "check out the career's office on the way out".

    Needless to say that wasn't the end of my veterinary career.

    With me it wasn't a single issue. I was burnt out from what was going on at home and the exam regime, bored and demotivated with the academic work, and what little revision I did wasn't "efficient" (or "productive" for a better word).

    I had to fight to get back on the course but a big part of that was taking a long hard look at what I really wanted to do and what would I do if I wasn't a vet. The grass is always greener, but when I was realistic about the options available I kept coming back to veterinary science. Knuckling down with the academic modules was a necessary evil until I could get to the more practical side (eg; clinical EMS, rotations/clerking) that I enjoyed and always excelled at.

    Once back onto the course I had to change the way I revised. Instead of rereading and rewriting my notes I started meeting up with one of my friends once every 1-2 weeks throughout term, normally in a nice coffee shop, to work through past paper questions or talk through aspects of the syllabus we struggled with. Having a friend there helped improve my discipline and we'd set targets for working through the syllabus. Then when at home I'd use flashcards or past paper questions to test myself.

    As far as quantity of revision went I did do slightly more but it was more spread out (ie; a 1-2 hours a week) rather than leaving it to the last week before exams. Similarly in the immediate run up to exams I would maybe do 4-6 hours a day interspersed with tv/film/gym breaks and normally take the night off before an exam to decompress.

    It may sound counterintuitive but I got my best results through this - no further resits and even some good grades behind me (a couple of merits and a distinction). Sure it was always hard but with time you learn to adapt to the stress.

    You can do it.

    Unfortunately vet school is very academically biased, in selection, teaching and examining whether you are fit to practice at the end of it all. This favours some people more than others. However, when you graduate the opposite is often true, most employers select for practical and vocational skills.

    Anecdotally most of the resit students I know found it easier to get a job and are further along in their career than the more academic graduates.

    Fast forward several years...I have a good job, I train junior vets and student nurses, and I am a significant way through a fully sponsored postgrad certificate. Not bad for a "borderline" student.
    Thank you for spending the time to reply to me, it's nice to know I'm not alone feeling like this. And that actually failing modules doesn't mean I won't be able to make a good vet.

    I had an epiphany this summer revising for my resits that actually my revision style is all wrong. There's physically too much to learn by just writing it all up and reading it back. The stuff I had time to write questions on and make flash cards, I remember a lot better. I like the idea of meeting up with a friend to go over stuff though. It would give me mini deadlines to keep on top of things as I go along.

    Can I ask, how did you find that motivation again after feeling the way you did? Any top tips from being at this point, to finding the energy to put in all the hard work? Or was it just the realisation that you only wanted to be a vet and you had to fight for it...
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    Whilst I can't comment on failing modules and the battle that brings. I can comment on losses of motivation.

    I've been at uni 4 years now, in that time, I have considered giving up a lot. Often considering doing medicine or yoloing it and becoming a farm hand

    You're not alone in doubts about becoming a vet!

    And no you're not stupid, you just need to find a different way of revising - I sit in lectures and put lectures into conciser forms into One Note and then at revision, I read said notes and write down anything I think I don't know. It's not for everyone, but as I'm a very visual learner, it works well for me. A far cry from my days writing everything out by hand - that was savage
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    (Original post by Traytray)
    Thank you for spending the time to reply to me, it's nice to know I'm not alone feeling like this. And that actually failing modules doesn't mean I won't be able to make a good vet.
    Being a vet is so much more than passing written and computer based exams.

    Sure having a expansive knowledge helps but every practice has textbooks and/or more experienced colleagues to ask for advice. Towards the end of vet school the emphasis tends to be more on making sure you're "safe" and have sound day one competencies, not a textbook knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, etc.

    You would be surprised how much you will learn on the job from seeing cases, making mistakes (you will probably learn the most from your mistakes), talking to more experienced members of staff or specialists and CPD. Your whole career is a learning experience, it doesn't start and stop at vet school.

    Generally it is much more difficult to develop someone's practical and/or communication skills. Of the people I know from my old year group who really struggled getting and holding a job these were the areas that held them back.

    I had an epiphany this summer revising for my resits that actually my revision style is all wrong. There's physically too much to learn by just writing it all up and reading it back. The stuff I had time to write questions on and make flash cards, I remember a lot better. I like the idea of meeting up with a friend to go over stuff though. It would give me mini deadlines to keep on top of things as I go along.
    Exactly.

    It may work well in GCSEs or A-levels but not a full time science degree.

    Can I ask, how did you find that motivation again after feeling the way you did? Any top tips from being at this point, to finding the energy to put in all the hard work? Or was it just the realisation that you only wanted to be a vet and you had to fight for it...
    It was a mixture of things.

    I had always enjoyed my placements and always got great references from them, something that I was actually told was "worthless" when I was expelled.

    When I started to investigate alternative options, such as alternative degrees, it was clear that I would still have to commit to another 2-3 years of study, in a subject that I would likely find just as uninspiring, with worse job prospects at the end of it all. Then when I looked at dropping out and going into the military there was the waste of two years of study, the student debt, the shame and uncertain job prospects. Like I said, the grass always appears greener.

    Ultimately it was the realisation that it was what I genuinely wanted to do and that I was (or would be!) good at it, not necessarily from an academic perspective but definitely from a practical or vocational standpoint.
 
 
 
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