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    I've probably put this in the wrong place so sorry in advance...

    This probably sounds like a silly thing to say but I feel like as I've gotten older, I've become less mentally sharp? Having taken my GCSEs and A levels, it's clear that I've done worse in school as I've gotten older and I'm not really sure why? It's not that I'm not trying hard because I am, but it's difficult for myself as a competitive person seeing people who I used to beat in exams etc. now coming miles ahead of me. I know I shouldn't compare myself to others, but it's making me question whether I'm reaching my full potential.

    Has anyone else experienced this and can anyone give me some advice as to why this may be and what can I do to stop this happening?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question (no pun intended). :giggle:
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    I'm getting the same feeling about myself. However, I think that the reason for that may be that I stopped training my brain the way I once used to and now simply "rely" on it when it isn't even reliable.

    My advice: Reflect upon how you study, especially if your subject is a science - and I'm not just refer to biology, chemistry and physics.
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    (Original post by EmmaLouise759)
    I've probably put this in the wrong place so sorry in advance...

    This probably sounds like a silly thing to say but I feel like as I've gotten older, I've become less mentally sharp? Having taken my GCSEs and A levels, it's clear that I've done worse in school as I've gotten older and I'm not really sure why? It's not that I'm not trying hard because I am, but it's difficult for myself as a competitive person seeing people who I used to beat in exams etc. now coming miles ahead of me. I know I shouldn't compare myself to others, but it's making me question whether I'm reaching my full potential.

    Has anyone else experienced this and can anyone give me some advice as to why this may be and what can I do to stop this happening?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question (no pun intended). :giggle:
    This may sound harsh (and could be completely inaccurate - I don't know you after all) but is it possible that your higher performance at an earlier age was actually an indication of superior work ethic as opposed to superior ability? It is generally the case that the people who do well in their GCSEs do so because they have worked hard - while those who work less hard (despite maybe having a higher ability) may obtain worse grades. Thus it may follow that as you progress through school into work that requires a higher natural ability you may suffer the illusion of becoming 'less mentally sharp' when in fact your underlying ability remains constant while the leverage your superior work ethic once gave you reduces. Giving you the appearance of slipping relative to your fellow students.

    I must reiterate that this is just one possible explanation, but it is something that I have noticed as I progress through school. I should also emphasise that at any stage of life a superior work ethic is always a bonus, so it's definitely something to be proud of.
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    (Original post by EmmaLouise759)
    I've probably put this in the wrong place so sorry in advance...

    This probably sounds like a silly thing to say but I feel like as I've gotten older, I've become less mentally sharp? Having taken my GCSEs and A levels, it's clear that I've done worse in school as I've gotten older and I'm not really sure why? It's not that I'm not trying hard because I am, but it's difficult for myself as a competitive person seeing people who I used to beat in exams etc. now coming miles ahead of me. I know I shouldn't compare myself to others, but it's making me question whether I'm reaching my full potential.

    Has anyone else experienced this and can anyone give me some advice as to why this may be and what can I do to stop this happening?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question (no pun intended). :giggle:
    It's been stated that GCSEs are a better indicator of intelligence than A Levels, since effort plays a larger part in the achievement of A Level grades, compared to GCSEs. However, GCSEs themselves aren't too great of indicator themselves, but naturally there will be positive correlation in intelligence with regards to GCSE score. The main weakness in using grades to determine intelligience is that it's fairly good at the lower grades (such as B-U) in providing some understanding of people's ability; though once you consider students that have 5A*>, the margin of error is very high.

    Take the Oxford TSA; it's essentially a culture heavy IQ test. It'll show you where you stand in terms of highly academic students(the ones that apply to Oxford, of course). In terms of free content, that is probably the best you'll get (use section 1, the essay takes effort).

    There is also http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf
    Which is touted as being the most accurate IQ test on the Internet. People who've had theirs tested in real life state that the results on this test are a bit lower, so keep that in mind.

    Lastly, intelligience (in my opinion) means using your knowledge in unfamiliar situations. Knowledge itself means having information in your head. Now, aren't A Levels and GCSEs mostly knowledge? That's why aptitude tests exist to give a better indicator of genuine intelligience.
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    It's been stated that GCSEs are a better indicator of intelligence than A Levels, since effort plays a larger part in the achievement of A Level grades, compared to GCSEs. However, GCSEs themselves aren't too great of indicator themselves, but naturally there will be positive correlation in intelligence with regards to GCSE score. The main weakness in using grades to determine intelligience is that it's fairly good at the lower grades (such as B-U) in providing some understanding of people's ability; though once you consider students that have 5A*>, the margin of error is very high.

    Take the Oxford TSA; it's essentially a culture heavy IQ test. It'll show you where you stand in terms of highly academic students(the ones that apply to Oxford, of course). In terms of free content, that is probably the best you'll get (use section 1, the essay takes effort).

    There is also http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf
    Which is touted as being the most accurate IQ test on the Internet. People who've had theirs tested in real life state that the results on this test are a bit lower, so keep that in mind.

    Lastly, intelligience (in my opinion) means using your knowledge in unfamiliar situations. Knowledge itself means having information in your head. Now, aren't A Levels and GCSEs mostly knowledge? That's why aptitude tests exist to give a better indicator of genuine intelligience.
    You mean the same aptitude tests that are ridiculed by many in academia for their inaccuracy due to the test taker's ability to score highly via practicing? Hardly coincides with your definition of 'intelligence'.
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    (Original post by EmmaLouise759)
    I've probably put this in the wrong place so sorry in advance...

    This probably sounds like a silly thing to say but I feel like as I've gotten older, I've become less mentally sharp? Having taken my GCSEs and A levels, it's clear that I've done worse in school as I've gotten older and I'm not really sure why? It's not that I'm not trying hard because I am, but it's difficult for myself as a competitive person seeing people who I used to beat in exams etc. now coming miles ahead of me. I know I shouldn't compare myself to others, but it's making me question whether I'm reaching my full potential.

    Has anyone else experienced this and can anyone give me some advice as to why this may be and what can I do to stop this happening?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question (no pun intended). :giggle:
    Well you already seem to know that you shouldn't compare yourself to others especially since that'll make you feel less capable even more, and even though this sounds cheesy, you're as capable as you can make yourself. Don't put yourself or let others make you feel less than you're worth. Perhaps you need to find that subject which you flourish at naturally and have a drive and motivation to study that subject. Dispite getting A*'s in a subject at GCSE doesn't necessarily mean you'll be an A* student at it for Alevels.
    Also you'll know if you've reached your capability when you can say with absolute certainty that you gave it 100% effort, if you feel like that grade wasn't a true reflection of what you could do then you probably can do better. But remember don't put yourself through health risks to achieve a grade which will be overlooked later, health comes first, so don't stress.

    Grades don't define you! It's your knowledge and your application of your knowledge which makes you intelligent.
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    You mean the same aptitude tests that are ridiculed by many in academia for their inaccuracy due to the test taker's ability to score highly via practicing? Hardly coincides with your definition of 'intelligence'.
    Have you ever taken an aptitude test? Your score will score will improve marginally upon reptition - and that improvement is generally down to adapting to time constraints, rather than gaining familiarity of the content. Many aptitude tests have problem solving tasks that you cannot prepare and revise for, just ask those taking the BMAT/TSA etc.

    Ironically, you say it's ridiculed by academics, But Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial that contain the most renowned academics have aptitude tests for many subjects, so clearly your statement is false, as these tests are written and administered by academics themselves.

    Hopefully your next response will be better.
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    You mean the same aptitude tests that are ridiculed by many in academia for their inaccuracy due to the test taker's ability to score highly via practicing? Hardly coincides with your definition of 'intelligence'.
    I'm sorry but I find it rather sad that you've decided to look back on old threads of mine to take a stab at me. I really hoped you'd have something much better to do with your time. Maybe try doing something more productive. :cute:
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    Have you ever taken an aptitude test? Your score will score will improve marginally upon reptition - and that improvement is generally down to adapting to time constraints, rather than gaining familiarity of the content. Many aptitude tests have problem solving tasks that you cannot prepare and revise for, just ask those taking the BMAT/TSA etc.

    Ironically, you say it's ridiculed by academics, But Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial that contain the most renowned academics have aptitude tests for many subjects, so clearly your statement is false, as these tests are written and administered by academics themselves.

    Hopefully your next response will be better.
    Yes, I have taken aptitude tests, loads of them. Inductive/logical reasoning being my one of choice. Interestingly, when I first looked at them, they scared me and I done extremely poorly on practices. Over a very short period of time, I worked out a formula, and now I can literally score between 90 and 100% without seeing the test before hand. And believe me, that is down to content, not time constraints.

    Is this a 'marginal' increast in ability? You said they measure intelligence? You said intelligence is about how you respond to new things with your knowledge. Now please, tell me how standardized aptitutde tests fit in there... Your arguement is illogical, and flawed. Worse still, you're defending your position - you don't even see how contradictory you are.

    And please, don't cite three universities and tell me academics love the tests. For every one lecturer you can find me at either of those who praises the tests, I'll find you one more from a better business of psychology school globally that says they are poor.
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    Yes, I have taken aptitude tests, loads of them. Inductive/logical reasoning being my one of choice. Interestingly, when I first looked at them, they scared me and I done extremely poorly on practices. Over a very short period of time, I worked out a formula, and now I can literally score between 90 and 100% without seeing the test before hand. And believe me, that is down to content, not time constraints.

    Is this a 'marginal' increast in ability? You said they measure intelligence? You said intelligence is about how you respond to new things with your knowledge. Now please, tell me how standardized aptitutde tests fit in there... Your arguement is illogical, and flawed. Worse still, you're defending your position - you don't even see how contradictory you are.

    And please, don't cite three universities and tell me academics love the tests. For every one lecturer you can find me at either of those who praises the tests, I'll find you one more from a better business of psychology school globally that says they are poor.
    You claim you can score at least 90% on any aptitude test? Do you really expect anyone on this thread to believe that? 90% on STEP, BMAT and TSA my ass. I've mentioned earlier they have many questions in which you CANNOT revise for, hence showing the application of knowledge in unknown situations, yet you revert to saying I'm contradicting myself?

    Then you say you can find other academics that say they are poor. NEWFLASH, Harvard, MIT, Oxford and Cambridge among other universities have the BEST academics in the world, and they all have multiple aptitude tests for each subject. Hell, you need to sit an aptitude test to get into Oxford for psychology.

    When you said academics think it's "poor" did you mean esteemed ones, or the ones you magically created in your mind?
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    You claim you can score at least 90% on any aptitude test? Do you really expect anyone on this thread to believe that? 90% on STEP, BMAT and TSA my ass. I've mentioned earlier they have many questions in which you CANNOT revise for, hence showing the application of knowledge in unknown situations, yet you revert to saying I'm contradicting myself?

    Then you say you can find other academics that say they are poor. NEWFLASH, Harvard, MIT, Oxford and Cambridge among other universities have the BEST academics in the world, and they all have multiple aptitude tests for each subject. Hell, you need to sit an aptitude test to get into Oxford for psychology.

    When you said academics think it's "poor" did you mean esteemed ones, or the ones you magically created in your mind?
    Jesus, I think were done talking.
 
 
 
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