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Are Liberal Arts and Sciences degrees less respected by employers? Watch

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    Having researched how the programme of such a degree typically works in the UK, I personally feel very enthusiastic about the thought of being able to combine two, maybe three, of my interests academically. These programmes seem to be well organised and do appear to allow you to pursue the major/minor route, or study perhaps two subjects in significant depth, a level of depth comparable to that which a joint degree provides, which appeals to me.

    However, because it's relatively new to the UK, I am concerned that employers and those in academia who have studied a traditional subject will view this as a 'pick and mix' degree, even if it has been obtained from a Russell Group. I intend to major in a science subject and acquire the skills, knowledge, etc to the level of someone who has done as straight degree (Lib Arts/Sciences will provide that due to an extra year at uni) but I wouldn't know how I would demonstrate that to employers put off by the degree title. Equally, would I be disadvantaged applying for internships? Would I be disadvantaged if I wanted to pursue postgrad study/go into academia? When I spoke to staff at a uni I'm interested in about my possible commitment to majoring in a subject/taking the modules that would give me a foundation for doing a Masters through this programme, they just talked about the flexibility of my programme and how I shouldn't worry because of this... and I've heard that at UCL (don't quote me on this, and do correct me if I'm wrong) that Liberal Arts and Sciences isn't too respected by the other departments.

    I can see that studying a couple of different disciplines would be, in practice, demanding, and the entry requirements seem to reflect that: A*AA - AAA at UCL/Birmingham/Durham/Bristol. It's not a "drinker's degree", but will it be seen by employers/the world of academia as such?

    Should I be worried about the prestige of the degree?
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    Keele university offers degrees with a major and a minor in different subjects.
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    (Original post by lolaacer3)
    Having researched how the programme of such a degree typically works in the UK, I personally feel very enthusiastic about the thought of being able to combine two, maybe three, of my interests academically. These programmes seem to be well organised and do appear to allow you to pursue the major/minor route, or study perhaps two subjects in significant depth, a level of depth comparable to that which a joint degree provides, which appeals to me.

    However, because it's relatively new to the UK, I am concerned that employers and those in academia who have studied a traditional subject will view this as a 'pick and mix' degree, even if it has been obtained from a Russell Group. I intend to major in a science subject and acquire the skills, knowledge, etc to the level of someone who has done as straight degree (Lib Arts/Sciences will provide that due to an extra year at uni) but I wouldn't know how I would demonstrate that to employers put off by the degree title. Equally, would I be disadvantaged applying for internships? Would I be disadvantaged if I wanted to pursue postgrad study/go into academia? When I spoke to staff at a uni I'm interested in about my possible commitment to majoring in a subject/taking the modules that would give me a foundation for doing a Masters through this programme, they just talked about the flexibility of my programme and how I shouldn't worry because of this... and I've heard that at UCL (don't quote me on this, and do correct me if I'm wrong) that Liberal Arts and Sciences isn't too respected by the other departments.

    I can see that studying a couple of different disciplines would be, in practice, demanding, and the entry requirements seem to reflect that: A*AA - AAA at UCL/Birmingham/Durham/Bristol. It's not a "drinker's degree", but will it be seen by employers/the world of academia as such?

    Should I be worried about the prestige of the degree?
    As far as employers go, if they don't specifiy what degree they require, then they really don't mind. What employers care more about is the strength of the application and evidence of soft skills and competencies gained not just through university but through work experience too.

    When it comes to academia, some universities and department are more fussy than others that for a masters the applicant must have an undergrad degree in a related subject.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    As far as employers go, if they don't specifiy what degree they require, then they really don't mind. What employers care more about is the strength of the application and evidence of soft skills and competencies gained not just through university but through work experience too.

    When it comes to academia, some universities and department are more fussy than others that for a masters the applicant must have an undergrad degree in a related subject.
    Say if you've attained a degree in (just to use the example of a science + humanities combo) Biology and History (joint honours) or Biology with History (major/minor), in competing with straight Biology graduates applying for a job in the field that makes use of the degree (say in research), would you be disadvantaged? Assuming that there is little difference in terms of other factors such as work experience. I'm concerned mainly about my prospects with regard to jobs in the field my degree would relate to. If I was planning to explore the humanities subjects only, I think perhaps I wouldn't be as worried.

    Also, would it be incorrect to assume that the more prestigious departments would be more likely to discriminate by undergrad degree choice with regard to postgrad study? E.g. an application for a History Masters from a student whose background lies in History and Biology (combined honours) would be less competitive than one from a student who did a straight History degree? I do want to leave the door open for going down the route of academia in my chosen humanities subject.

    Thank you for replying, btw - I am grateful
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    (Original post by lolaacer3)
    Say if you've attained a degree in (just to use the example of a science + humanities combo) Biology and History (joint honours) or Biology with History (major/minor), in competing with straight Biology graduates applying for a job in the field that makes use of the degree (say in research), would you be disadvantaged? Assuming that there is little difference in terms of other factors such as work experience. I'm concerned mainly about my prospects with regard to jobs in the field my degree would relate to. If I was planning to explore the humanities subjects only, I think perhaps I wouldn't be as worried.

    Also, would it be incorrect to assume that the more prestigious departments would be more likely to discriminate by undergrad degree choice with regard to postgrad study? E.g. an application for a History Masters from a student whose background lies in History and Biology (combined honours) would be less competitive than one from a student who did a straight History degree? I do want to leave the door open for going down the route of academia in my chosen humanities subject.

    Thank you for replying, btw - I am grateful
    Afraid I'm not sure.
 
 
 
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