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    Hey all,

    I'm back on Citalopram after a long hiatus from anti-depressant medication. I'm on it primarily for my bouts of depression and social anxiety

    I'm not the worst I've ever felt, nor am I the best- but that's just it. That is a source of my sort of frustration- I don't feel worthy enough to be on them (i.e. bad enough- not in dire straights), but at the same time I am kind of sad and stressed out over my work situation. This exacerbates my anxiety somewhat.

    I recently moved to a new area, and been in a new job for about 4 months. By no means am I suicidal or self-harming like I once was, but I am very anxious, stressed and burned out.

    The doctor has put me on 10mg, which is a measly dosage to what I used to be accustomed too- was on 20mg. I think he did this purely because he asked of suicidal thoughts/self harm and I told him that no I didn't.

    I think the depression is mild, and its increasingly creeping up on me, with bouts of crying in the mornings before having to go to my job which I hate.

    As for side effects, I am feeling very woozy and sort of spaced out, I've forgotten how comforting it is to be on these pills. There is something very comforting and good about the sense of indifference Citalopram gives you.

    My headspace seems clouded and fuzzy and I feel a sort of dull heaviness in my head. But it isn't an alarming sensation. You know its there but it doesn't bother you.

    It is really a kind of artificial inebriation- where I feel a mild jolliness.

    I guess the point I'm making is, i'm surprised 10mg can do this to me. Within literally two minutes of ingesting the medication I actually had like a 5 second duration of dizziness, and I felt this sense of relaxation come over me. Suppose it could be likened to smoking marijuana. I honestly thought I'd need an increased dosage. I suppose there's time yet.

    Anybody else have these experiences?
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    I felt as high as a kite when they started me on Citalopram. I never really got along with my co-workers and I've always been the quiet one who doesn't talk but when I first started Citalopram I couldn't shut up and I found everything to be really funny and hilarious. I felt like I was really stoned as well. It was very strange. My boss sent me home and made me get a doctors appointment. I was on the Citalopram for about a month.

    Anti Depressants I think are good. They don't make you happy but they give you what you need in order to cope.
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    (Original post by Ivee)
    I felt as high as a kite when they started me on Citalopram. I never really got along with my co-workers and I've always been the quiet one who doesn't talk but when I first started Citalopram I couldn't shut up and I found everything to be really funny and hilarious. I felt like I was really stoned as well. It was very strange. My boss sent me home and made me get a doctors appointment. I was on the Citalopram for about a month.

    Anti Depressants I think are good. They don't make you happy but they give you what you need in order to cope.
    Yes they are good in moderation- i.e. provided you aren't on them for too long. Obviously many people react differently to them, and some have reported on the negative effects of the drug.

    Apathy, indifference and generally not giving a damn. I found over the years in my experience of the drug, the longer you take it the more of a sort of vegetable you become. This feeling never sits well with me, and it always sort of concerned me, that feeling of not giving two hoots, and so this subsequently led to me discontinuing the first time around.

    Fast forward to now, and I am back on it, but I sort of relish in the fact I'm no longer giving a damn. I've forgotten how wonderful it is to not care.

    Can I ask why you stopped after a month?

    The biggest issue I found is becoming tolerant to the dosage.
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    (Original post by Ivee)
    I felt as high as a kite when they started me on Citalopram. I never really got along with my co-workers and I've always been the quiet one who doesn't talk but when I first started Citalopram I couldn't shut up and I found everything to be really funny and hilarious. I felt like I was really stoned as well. It was very strange. My boss sent me home and made me get a doctors appointment. I was on the Citalopram for about a month.

    Anti Depressants I think are good. They don't make you happy but they give you what you need in order to cope.
    How come your boss sent you home? For what reason?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yes they are good in moderation- i.e. provided you aren't on them for too long. Obviously many people react differently to them, and some have reported on the negative effects of the drug.

    Apathy, indifference and generally not giving a damn. I found over the years in my experience of the drug, the longer you take it the more of a sort of vegetable you become. This feeling never sits well with me, and it always sort of concerned me, that feeling of not giving two hoots, and so this subsequently led to me discontinuing the first time around.

    Fast forward to now, and I am back on it, but I sort of relish in the fact I'm no longer giving a damn. I've forgotten how wonderful it is to not care.

    Can I ask why you stopped after a month?

    The biggest issue I found is becoming tolerant to the dosage.
    I found that the Citalopram never worked for me. After the first few days I started to feel chaotic and I cried all the time and I kept breaking down and started to self destruct. After a month I went through about 3 different types of anti depressants and I got referred to a psychiatrist who then ruled out that anti-depressants are completely the wrong meds for me because my mood wasn't consistently low, it was constantly up and down. I got diagnosed with anxiety disorder and I'm awaiting assessment for Autism and ADHD ^_^. I'm taking anti-psychotics now, but I call them my "Put up with people pills".It's a lot of faff really I wouldn't wish it on any one.

    Becoming tolerant to the dosage sucks, because it feels like you have the perfect level in your hand and it begins to slowly drain like you're holding water, and you have to increase the amount and then you can't increase it any more.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How come your boss sent you home? For what reason?
    I'm not sure really, I was a little bit more ditsy than normal and I guess I wasn't behaving appropriately around the clients.
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    (Original post by Ivee)
    I found that the Citalopram never worked for me. After the first few days I started to feel chaotic and I cried all the time and I kept breaking down and started to self destruct. After a month I went through about 3 different types of anti depressants and I got referred to a psychiatrist who then ruled out that anti-depressants are completely the wrong meds for me because my mood wasn't consistently low, it was constantly up and down. I got diagnosed with anxiety disorder and I'm awaiting assessment for Autism and ADHD ^_^. I'm taking anti-psychotics now, but I call them my "Put up with people pills".It's a lot of faff really I wouldn't wish it on any one.

    Becoming tolerant to the dosage sucks, because it feels like you have the perfect level in your hand and it begins to slowly drain like you're holding water, and you have to increase the amount and then you can't increase it any more.
    Ah, yeah SSRI's seem to be a hit and miss scenario for many people. More people seem to report negatives over positives.

    Were you referred to a psychiatrist on the NHS?

    I've had experience of Citalopram and Fluoxetine. Fluoxetine didn't work whatsover- whereas Citalopram had an immediate sedative affect on my mood. I had a small episode of vertigo come over me, and I just felt numb. It is pretty powerful stuff.

    Apart from SSRI's I've never tried other types of medication, purely because GP's are reluctant to try you on other drugs due to associated health risks and addictions.

    My problem isn't so much depression, although to say I'm not is an understatement. I am more anxious and on edge 24/7.

    The last part you mention about tolerance is so so true and I agree 100% about it feeling like water running through your hands. You simply have no control over the drug's affect lessening- then you have to increase dosage or switch meds.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Ah, yeah SSRI's seem to be a hit and miss scenario for many people. More people seem to report negatives over positives.

    Were you referred to a psychiatrist on the NHS?

    I've had experience of Citalopram and Fluoxetine. Fluoxetine didn't work whatsover- whereas Citalopram had an immediate sedative affect on my mood. I had a small episode of vertigo come over me, and I just felt numb. It is pretty powerful stuff.

    Apart from SSRI's I've never tried other types of medication, purely because GP's are reluctant to try you on other drugs due to associated health risks and addictions.

    My problem isn't so much depression, although to say I'm not is an understatement. I am more anxious and on edge 24/7.

    The last part you mention about tolerance is so so true and I agree 100% about it feeling like water running through your hands. You simply have no control over the drug's affect lessening- then you have to increase dosage or switch meds.
    I was referred to a psychiatrist on the NHS, it took a while to get an appointment but I had to argue with my doctor for him to refer me because he was going to fob me off and say I don't need it.

    I was put on Mirtazapine after the Citalopram, Then Sertraline and then Fluoxetine. But I was only on the Fluoxetine for a few days. They really can make you feel like you're so numb and you don't care.

    My problems have been more with anxiety than depression also. I found that the depression was a symptom resulting from the anxiety and social isolation.

    I have found that since taking the anti-psychotic medication I'm on, it's relieved a lot of the anxiety and I can function a lot better. I have been feeling less depressed as a result.
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    (Original post by Ivee)
    I was referred to a psychiatrist on the NHS, it took a while to get an appointment but I had to argue with my doctor for him to refer me because he was going to fob me off and say I don't need it.

    I was put on Mirtazapine after the Citalopram, Then Sertraline and then Fluoxetine. But I was only on the Fluoxetine for a few days. They really can make you feel like you're so numb and you don't care.

    My problems have been more with anxiety than depression also. I found that the depression was a symptom resulting from the anxiety and social isolation.

    I have found that since taking the anti-psychotic medication I'm on, it's relieved a lot of the anxiety and I can function a lot better. I have been feeling less depressed as a result.
    What you describe sounds all too typical of GPs within the NHS. They'd rather prescribe a temporary drug that will only hinder you or cause further psychological issues.

    What was Mirtazapine like? I've heard horror stories about Sertraline.

    It's interesting what you say about Anti-Psychotic medication- perhaps I will have to pester my GP for some- although I doubt he'll prescribe those to me.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    What you describe sounds all too typical of GPs within the NHS. They'd rather prescribe a temporary drug that will only hinder you or cause further psychological issues.

    What was Mirtazapine like? I've heard horror stories about Sertraline.

    It's interesting what you say about Anti-Psychotic medication- perhaps I will have to pester my GP for some- although I doubt he'll prescribe those to me.
    I was on Mirtazapine for about 1 week. I slept A LOT and I was really super duper hungry and I ate a lot as well.

    The best experience I had with anti depressants was the Sertraline. I took my anti depressants with 80mg of Propanolol slow release (I forgot to mention) which took the edge off of things a little bit. The propanolol worked wonders for me, but the reason I stopped taking them is because I got really low blood pressure and bad asthma symptoms.

    I doubt that the GP would prescribe Quetiapine if he thinks it's depression. I would recommend asking for a referral to a psychiatrist as they know what they are doing and they can help you so much better.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    What was Mirtazapine like?
    It can be very, very sedating. As well, as has already been mentioned, it makes your hungry like nothing else. I remember doing stuff like eating peanut butter out of the jar with a spoon I was so hungry that I couldn't wait long enough to cook a meal. Often called the "mirtazapine munchies".

    Weirdly, it gets less sedating if you increase the dose, but I was on it for about 4 years and it would still knock me out at night. 15mg mirtazapine (lowest dose) is about as sedating, ime, as 1000mg seroquel. And that is a big dose.
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    I was put back on citalopram again yesterday. I was on it very briefly a couple of years ago but was taken off as they suspected bipolar as prozac made me crazy a few years ago - then subsequently that diagnosis was changed as (amongst other reasons) what everyone thought was a tendency towards 'hypomania' were meltdowns as a result of sensory and emotional overload and so they diagnosed me with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) with depression and OCD. According to my GP, in Wales they've stopped prescribing prozac due to all the adverse effects.

    Can't say it's all that much fun being back on meds. I'm also feeling woozy and spaced out. I've also got terrible nausea and insomnia. Although I took it in the morning today so I'm going to see whether that's going to help me sleep better tonight. I can't say I've noticed a change at all. I've also been prescribed diazepam twice a day for the first ten days to combat the anxiety side effect people get (as it's anxiety which is one of the main reasons I'm taking it) and it seems as though it's only because of the diazepam I'm feeling less anxious. As one dose wears off I can feel the anxiety coming back. When the diazepam wears off I basically feel the same as I did emotionally only with all the annoying side effects of the citalopram. It takes quite a while to kick in apparently.

    Apparently all the spaced outness and other stuff passes after a few weeks.
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    (Original post by LesPaul_Player91)
    I was put back on citalopram again yesterday. I was on it very briefly a couple of years ago but was taken off as they suspected bipolar as prozac made me crazy a few years ago - then subsequently that diagnosis was changed as (amongst other reasons) what everyone thought was a tendency towards 'hypomania' were meltdowns as a result of sensory and emotional overload and so they diagnosed me with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) with depression and OCD. According to my GP, in Wales they've stopped prescribing prozac due to all the adverse effects.

    Can't say it's all that much fun being back on meds. I'm also feeling woozy and spaced out. I've also got terrible nausea and insomnia. Although I took it in the morning today so I'm going to see whether that's going to help me sleep better tonight. I can't say I've noticed a change at all. I've also been prescribed diazepam twice a day for the first ten days to combat the anxiety side effect people get (as it's anxiety which is one of the main reasons I'm taking it) and it seems as though it's only because of the diazepam I'm feeling less anxious. As one dose wears off I can feel the anxiety coming back. When the diazepam wears off I basically feel the same as I did emotionally only with all the annoying side effects of the citalopram. It takes quite a while to kick in apparently.

    Apparently all the spaced outness and other stuff passes after a few weeks.
    Yeah its unfortunate that the 'spaced outness' passes because that is exactly what I like about been medicated if I'm honest. While it is mildly disruptive to daily life and can impede concentration a little, it certainly tapers off the anxiety.

    Again, for me the only reason I take medication at all is for anxiety above all reasons. If it's suddenly going to stop working I often wonder why I bother. I'm going to request a higher dosage when I return for my review in two weeks. Of course, eventually I know I will have to switch drugs due to tolerance.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah its unfortunate that the 'spaced outness' passes because that is exactly what I like about been medicated if I'm honest. While it is mildly disruptive to daily life and can impede concentration a little, it certainly tapers off the anxiety.

    Again, for me the only reason I take medication at all is for anxiety above all reasons. If it's suddenly going to stop working I often wonder why I bother. I'm going to request a higher dosage when I return for my review in two weeks. Of course, eventually I know I will have to switch drugs due to tolerance.
    Ah, I'm the complete opposite, it's mainly because I have stuff to get on with though which is making it nigh on impossible. Having said that, I was hardly hugely productive before when I was depressed and anxious so I guess it's not a major change.

    The diazepam is probably making me extra spaced out as well. The most annoying thing for me is the insomnia which seems to be very common with citalopram - I get four hours sleep then wake up, can't sleep for two hours then go back to sleep for an hour or two. Wake up, have breakfast, take my meds and then I'm completely knocked out. I started taking them at night as I figured because they're so sedating I'd sleep really well but it's actually worse if I take them at night
 
 
 
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