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    So, I'm going into year thirteen in September, first draft of my personal statement is due in when we get back. The thing is, I have NOTHING to put on it. From their perspective, I won't look like a 'rounded person' because I have no work experience (apart from placement with Health and Social Care) and I have not had a job before! Nothing special to put on it at all!

    I am really worried about this because I'm confident I'll exceed the entry requirements for Sociology and Criminology but it's the personal statement that's important! Some reassurance, guidance or tips would be lovely, although it really is too late to make much of a difference now.

    P.S Is it worth putting things in your personal statement like you listening to podcasts/ reading books in relation to your desired course?
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    (Original post by Ervahy)
    So, I'm going into year thirteen in September, first draft of my personal statement is due in when we get back. The thing is, I have NOTHING to put on it. From their perspective, I won't look like a 'rounded person' because I have no work experience (apart from placement with Health and Social Care) and I have not had a job before! Nothing special to put on it at all!

    I am really worried about this because I'm confident I'll exceed the entry requirements for Sociology and Criminology but it's the personal statement that's important! Some reassurance, guidance or tips would be lovely, although it really is too late to make much of a difference now.

    P.S Is it worth putting things in your personal statement like you listening to podcasts/ reading books in relation to your desired course?
    Yes, books related to your course are perfectly fine to be mentioned (if you're sure they're relevant- and that is, scientific books, not things you like to read for kicks). A placement sounds pretty nice! Do emphasize what you've learnt from it. It's not as much what you've done, but what you could learn from it. Are there any school activities you've done that could be mentioned? Not directly related to your subject of choice, but something that could develop soft skills. For example, prove that you've improved your communication and/or leadership skills, this works for all degrees of choice.
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    (Original post by InternationalXX)
    Yes, books related to your course are perfectly fine to be mentioned (if you're sure they're relevant- and that is, scientific books, not things you like to read for kicks). A placement sounds pretty nice! Do emphasize what you've learnt from it. It's not as much what you've done, but what you could learn from it. Are there any school activities you've done that could be mentioned? Not directly related to your subject of choice, but something that could develop soft skills. For example, prove that you've improved your communication and/or leadership skills, this works for all degrees of choice.
    In school, I've only done things such as presentations, assemblies to lower years with Health and Social, helped with after school information evenings, helped with off timetable days... Nothing major, I'm not a prefect in anything.
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    Honestly don't worry too much about things like that! I spent a lot of time worrying about this last year because I had pretty much nothing that was particularly relevant to my course. I only had one semi-relevant summer placement that I mentioned in my statement. Mention your placement and what skills you developed because of it e.g. team work, communication, leadership (even if it's not entirely true). Other than that, and the brief mention that I've been self-teaching myself to play the piano for the past 5-ish years, I mostly talked about books/podcasts/online lectures (so do mention those!) on topics that went beyond the A Level syllabus. For example, after my introduction, my first main paragraph started with 'I find physical chemistry the most interesting...' I then mentioned a topic that we learnt about at school and how that led me to look into a different topic that is most definitely not taught at A Level. Show your passion and excitement for the subject. Take a look at the course(s) and mention something that you look forward to learning about. If you have any future plans, even if you're not 100% certain that's what you'll end up doing, mention those too.

    You could also look for work experience and if you manage to find one you could mention it in terms of what you hope to gain from it. I recommend you try to make your introduction somewhat original. I had to rewrite mine at least twenty times because it was never 'shiny' enough for my head of sixth form.

    My sixth form made it seem like not doing any volunteering, not having a job, not attending 200 million after-school clubs etc. would equal no university place. It's honestly not that big of a deal though (despite what reading other personal statement might make you think)! I had none of those things and I'll be starting chemistry at Imperial in October. Admissions Tutors really don't care whether or not you've done Duke of Edinburgh or if you play rugby every Sunday afternoon. They want to see why you love their subject and why you would benefit from a place at their university.
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    (Original post by victoria98)
    Honestly don't worry too much about things like that! I spent a lot of time worrying about this last year because I had pretty much nothing that was particularly relevant to my course. I only had one semi-relevant summer placement that I mentioned in my statement. Mention your placement and what skills you developed because of it e.g. team work, communication, leadership (even if it's not entirely true). Other than that, and the brief mention that I've been self-teaching myself to play the piano for the past 5-ish years, I mostly talked about books/podcasts/online lectures (so do mention those!) on topics that went beyond the A Level syllabus. For example, after my introduction, my first main paragraph started with 'I find physical chemistry the most interesting...' I then mentioned a topic that we learnt about at school and how that led me to look into a different topic that is most definitely not taught at A Level. Show your passion and excitement for the subject. Take a look at the course(s) and mention something that you look forward to learning about. If you have any future plans, even if you're not 100% certain that's what you'll end up doing, mention those too.

    You could also look for work experience and if you manage to find one you could mention it in terms of what you hope to gain from it. I recommend you try to make your introduction somewhat original. I had to rewrite mine at least twenty times because it was never 'shiny' enough for my head of sixth form.

    My sixth form made it seem like not doing any volunteering, not having a job, not attending 200 million after-school clubs etc. would equal no university place. It's honestly not that big of a deal though (despite what reading other personal statement might make you think)! I had none of those things and I'll be starting chemistry at Imperial in October. Admissions Tutors really don't care whether or not you've done Duke of Edinburgh or if you play rugby every Sunday afternoon. They want to see why you love their subject and why you would benefit from a place at their university.

    Thank you so much, this really helped!
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    Unis don't really care about work experience for academic courses. Check out the PS builder tool (linked in my signature below) and that will talk you through the process
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    (Original post by Ervahy)
    So, I'm going into year thirteen in September, first draft of my personal statement is due in when we get back. The thing is, I have NOTHING to put on it. From their perspective, I won't look like a 'rounded person' because I have no work experience (apart from placement with Health and Social Care) and I have not had a job before! Nothing special to put on it at all!

    I am really worried about this because I'm confident I'll exceed the entry requirements for Sociology and Criminology but it's the personal statement that's important! Some reassurance, guidance or tips would be lovely, although it really is too late to make much of a difference now.

    P.S Is it worth putting things in your personal statement like you listening to podcasts/ reading books in relation to your desired course?
    Check out my blog on personal statements:
    https://thenextchemist.wordpress.com...ment/#more-224

    And my emails on there so you'll be able to email me a draft of your personal statement
    I'll proof read it and edit minor bits and tell you how to improve on it

    Good luck!!


    (You say there's nothing to put on ur personal statement, it's not too late to do stuff in the year, there are links below my blog to lectures and events across the Uk which u can go to and mention in ur personal statement)


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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Check out my blog on personal statements:
    https://thenextchemist.wordpress.com...ment/#more-224

    And my emails on there so you'll be able to email me a draft of your personal statement
    I'll proof read it and edit minor bits and tell you how to improve on it

    Good luck!!


    (You say there's nothing to put on ur personal statement, it's not too late to do stuff in the year, there are links below my blog to lectures and events across the Uk which u can go to and mention in ur personal statement)


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    Please don't ask people to email you their PS. TSR suggests not sending it to anyone that applicants don't know, to ensure confidentiality
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    Please don't ask people to email you their PS. TSR suggests not sending it to anyone that applicants don't know, to ensure confidentiality
    Yes I understand
    I've got a blog and I'm willing to proof read anyone's work
    I assure you, everything will be confidential.
    I only want to help..


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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Yes I understand
    I've got a blog and I'm willing to proof read anyone's work
    I assure you, everything will be confidential.
    I only want to help..


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    That may be the case, but unfortunately there will be people who won't be like that and there's no way for TSR to differentiate between the two, so it's safer to have a blanket ban on people asking or volunteering for reviews over email. TSR has its own PS review service, so maybe post in Ask the CT and explain your situation?
 
 
 
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