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    There has been a veritable explosion in Law applicants during the past decade- it would be interesting to know why it's still increasing.
    Is it a matter of easy access to employment? That may be fair, but the majority of other degrees would provide people with equal or even greater prospects of employment (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...114975,00.html).
    Is it possibly that Law applicants seek employment which would equip them with the wealth to live lavish lifestyles? Even if this is the case (which would grossly contradict the principles of justice and fairness the law and its officers are supposed to uphold) successful City firms and barristers' chambers accept applicants educated at the top institutions, with at least a 2:1. Moreover, the chances of such distinguished employment (inclusive of all law graduates) is about 5/100 (this figure is roughly estimated from several other estimates).
    Personally, I want to study Law for its academic value, respecting it as a cornerstone in maintaining balance in modern societies.
    Maybe that's just me? What are other people's reasons for wanting to study law?
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    Personally I study it because I enjoy it. If I get far with law then that's a bonus, if not you can only try. I was once told about the money side to it, but I'm not that interested in finances, as long as I have enough to pay back my bills and have a good amount to live on, I don't care about not being able to afford a sports car and so on.

    (Original post by Lucid87)
    Is it possibly that Law applicants seek employment which would equip them with the wealth to live lavish lifestyles? Even if this is the case (which would grossly contradict the principles of justice and fairness the law and its officers are supposed to uphold)
    There's not a great deal who actually believe in justice or not to the extent other people do, even judges. Have you seen the film, "Let Him Have It"? Also prosecution barristers never revealed Stefan Kiszko's (sp?) medical condition which meant that if it was revealed to the defence he could not have been found guilty of rape, due to his condition. He served his sentence in prison for a crime he could not have committed physically and his mental condition diminished. I don't know how you can work with a conscience (sp?) knowing that you have not upheld justice, which is meant to be your job. I sincerely hope those prosecuting barristers never made it to the bench.

    I think some people care more about themselves than others, how much they can earn and how many cases they can win. This has negative ffects, as oen of my friends wanted to be a barrister and whilst he was at his work experience in chambers he overheard the greedy barristers on how much they can earn out of this case. From then on he disliked the idea. Now he's better off going into medicine anyway. Sending these messages don't help!
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    Not sure that seeking employment as a lawyer in order to obtain a lavish lifestyle could be classed as a gross contradiction of the principles of fairness and justice!? Yes, it is the intent underpinning any applicant's decision to study the law that gives meaning to his study yet non seq. that he will not also uphold principles of fairness and justice, etc. Unless you're suggesting there is something intrinsically morally wrong with earning lots of money and leading a lavish lifestyle???

    Nonetheless your reasons for studying law mark you out as a candidate of integrity and i wish you luck.
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    Six dinners sid, please forgive me, I failed to define 'justice' and 'fairness'- terms which have come to have as many meanings as the words hot and cold.

    'Justice' and 'fairness', as qualities of a practitioner of the law, denote equanimity and unequivocal devotion to what is right, namely to that which is good.

    Indeed, referring to your argument, anything that has short-term selfish pleasure as its object has everything 'intrinsically morally wrong' with it; after several years of observing people pursuing nothing less than whims, I would not like to expect the same people appear to espouse (historically) the epitome of all that is orderly, perpetual and objectively methodical- hence the contradiction.
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    People make me laugh, not trying to demean anyone, but as soon as you start practicing law in front a jury, half of them will be unable to understand your eloquent use of the English language. lol.
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    One reason I want to study it is I find it the most interesting and wide-ranging academic discipline you can study.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    People make me laugh, not trying to demean anyone, but as soon as you start practicing law in front a jury, half of them will be unable to understand your eloquent use of the English language. lol.
    lol

    I dont think I understand half of what some people in this thread have written lol. Then again, maybe its just me. Im trying to read Understanding Contract Law and its just WHOOOSH - way over my head. This is meant to be a beginners book? I am screwed next year!
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    (Original post by Lucid87)
    Six dinners sid, please forgive me, I failed to define 'justice' and 'fairness'- terms which have come to have as many meanings as the words hot and cold.

    'Justice' and 'fairness', as qualities of a practitioner of the law, denote equanimity and unequivocal devotion to what is right, namely to that which is good.

    Indeed, referring to your argument, anything that has short-term selfish pleasure as its object has everything 'intrinsically morally wrong' with it; after several years of observing people pursuing nothing less than whims, I would not like to expect the same people appear to espouse (historically) the epitome of all that is orderly, perpetual and objectively methodical- hence the contradiction.
    If you are a day younger than 50 years old I am scared of you.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    lol

    I dont think I understand half of what some people in this thread have written lol. Then again, maybe its just me. Im trying to read Understanding Contract Law and its just WHOOOSH - way over my head. This is meant to be a beginners book? I am screwed next year!
    Don't worry mate. I was in the same position 12 months back. It'll all start coming together as soon as you start your course in September.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    If you are a day younger than 50 years old I am scared of you.
    Hehe. Apparently he's only doing his A levels!

    Don't worry though. There is much more to being a good lawyer (or law student) than being able to view things from a jurisprudential perspective. You'll cope fine.
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    (Original post by law man)
    Don't worry mate. I was in the same position 12 months back. It'll all start coming together as soon as you start your course in September.
    Cheers .. made me feel a bit better lol

    Have you read that book? it goes on about jack and the beanstalk and uses it as an example of a contract lol.

    Then there is the load of technical names for things, and that section is split into two types, and then each of those two types is split further into another two types lol....its like one of those tree diagrams lol.
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    (Original post by law man)
    Hehe. Apparently he's only doing his A levels!

    Don't worry though. There is much more to being a good lawyer (or law student) than being able to view things from a jurisprudential perspective. You'll cope fine.
    Im sure ill be ok. I havnt done many writing subjects at A level so its gonna be a shock for me but i think my interest is there. My understanding of the English language is shocking though lol. I cant understand half of those words... and ive started on my reading list and I know those kind of words are there .. im just reading the next bit of the sentance and assumming a particular meaning to fit in with the context - haha probably totally wrong but never mind.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    Im sure ill be ok. I havnt done many writing subjects at A level so its gonna be a shock for me but i think my interest is there. My understanding of the English language is shocking though lol. I cant understand half of those words... and ive started on my reading list and I know those kind of words are there .. im just reading the next bit of the sentance and assumming a particular meaning to fit in with the context - haha probably totally wrong but never mind.


    I haven't read that one - is it the Clarendon one? I read Tomkins' Public Law last summer and I was in the same position. Stick with it though and you'll find your feet. I also recommend buying yourself a law dictionary. I got the Oxford one which served me well but I hear there are better ones. It'll explain all the terms in relatively simple language. You won't use at after the first few months but it'll certainly help you through the first couple of weeks!

    Oh, and don't concern youself too much with not having done 'writing' A levels. I did three sciences. Just make sure your grammar and sentence structure are sorted - a little practice is all it takes. Your vocab will expand with the amount of reading you'll certainly end up doing!
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    (Original post by law man)
    I haven't read that one - is it the Clarendon one? I read Tomkins' Public Law last summer and I was in the same position. Stick with it though and you'll find your feet. I also recommend buying yourself a law dictionary. I got the Oxford one which served me well but I hear there are better ones. It'll explain all the terms in relatively simple language. You won't use at after the first few months but it'll certainly help you through the first couple of weeks!

    Oh, and don't concern youself too much with not having done 'writing' A levels. I did three sciences. Just make sure your grammar and sentence structure are sorted - a little practice is all it takes. Your vocab will expand with the amount of reading you'll certainly end up doing!
    Is it LOADS of reading then? I really hate reading for long periods cos my eyes start to hurt lol - silly i know but its true. Its wierd that my eyes hurt moer though when what Im reading is boring lol.

    Dont you just find it really complex and entangled? Contract Im talking about.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    Im sure ill be ok. I havnt done many writing subjects at A level so its gonna be a shock for me but i think my interest is there. My understanding of the English language is shocking though lol. I cant understand half of those words...
    I think in some ways you are at an advantage. You'll find that a highly analytical way of writing is actually quite helpful for dealing with legal problem questions. The aim is to write simply, clearly and logically so that a layman can follow your argument without understanding the law behind it. Writing a paragraph containing only one sentence (but with hyphens, semi-colons and paranthesis) will only attract a lot of red pen from tutors. People, for some reason, (wrongly) think that flowery writing is good writing.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    lol

    I dont think I understand half of what some people in this thread have written lol. Then again, maybe its just me. Im trying to read Understanding Contract Law and its just WHOOOSH - way over my head. This is meant to be a beginners book? I am screwed next year!
    Is that the Adams and Brownsword book? If so, it isn't an ideal book to try to learn contract law from. It is certainly an interesting read after you understand how contract hangs together, but I think it is intended (or better used) to help you rationalise why contract law is as it is and the conflicting aims that contract law is trying to balance. I wouldn't worry if you aren't understanding too much of it at the moment! Once you get a good lecturer explaining contract law to you, a lot of the arguments that are central to the Adams and Brownsword thesis will start to make sense.

    In the meantime, yay to market individualism and boo to consumer welfarism.
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    (Original post by *dave*)
    Dont you just find it really complex and entangled? Contract Im talking about.
    Yes, law does tend to be that way - especially in a subject as vast as contract. With law you will realise that many categories/principles shade into other categories and principles - it's true whether we're talking about vast subjects or niche principles within the topic of 'offer and acceptance' in contract law.

    Part of being a good law student is being able to untangle that big messy body of complex laws, distinguishing the various principles, and applying structure to your knowledge, while all the time remembering how they are interelated with other principles. But those skills are ones that'll come with time.

    Perhaps the most important piece of advice I could give about your summer reading is that you needn't necessarily remember everything. Just try to understand it. There's plenty of time for committing everything to memory when you've started your course, and in revision. And you're right - they'll teach you everything when you start in September. It can just be a little overwhelming if you know absolutely nothing, which is why they give you summer reading: to ease you in a little more gently.
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    (Original post by jcw)
    The aim is to write simply, clearly and logically so that a layman can follow your argument without understanding the law behind it.
    Someone ought to tell Lord Bingham. His judgments are a disgrace to our jurisprudence.
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    (Original post by law man)
    Someone ought to tell Lord Bingham. His judgments are a disgrace to our jurisprudence.
    Please expand and give me your evidence. I am not necessarily disagreeing you here
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    (Original post by tomcoolinguk)
    The sad fact is most people have fallen into these traps. Such people are often identified by the fact that they have toyed with the idea of studying medicine- despite the fact that it is a totally different career!
    One only has to look through these forums to find such people. They are the AS level students that say things along the lines of "wow, at Clifford Chance there is a swimming pool etc. I'd like to work for them!". They then go away and start thinking about doing a law degree.
 
 
 
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