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    Yesterday I received my GCSE results and was very happy with what I got. I got 1B, 9A and 1A* which means I was accepted into my sixth form of choice. I intend to study English literature, Spanish, maths, biology and general studies. I really want to do well in my AS/A Levels so are there any tips I should know about?
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    Hey I just finished my alevels my main tips would be-
    Get your exam boards main text book for each subject
    Use and know your specification inside out just look up for example OCR biology specification (or whatever exam board you're doing) and make sure you learn about every single point
    Do past papers and learn mark schemes then you will understand the kind of answers your exam board look for and if a similar question comes up again you will know the answer
    Stay after school to revise if you have a study room or library stay there 1-2 hours each day get some revision done then go home and chill for the rest of the evening you will always be far more focused at school and get studying out the way even from the start of the year


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    Hey I just finished my alevels my main tips would be-
    Get your exam boards main text book for each subject
    Use and know your specification inside out just look up for example OCR biology specification (or whatever exam board you're doing) and make sure you learn about every single point
    Do past papers and learn mark schemes then you will understand the kind of answers your exam board look for and if a similar question comes up again you will know the answer
    Stay after school to revise if you have a study room or library stay there 1-2 hours each day get some revision done then go home and chill for the rest of the evening you will always be far more focused at school and get studying out the way even from the start of the year


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    my first tip!
    LEAVE PROCRASTINATION ALONE - do not shake hand :noway:
    start revising from the first-day
    be organised throughout the year
    :goodluck:
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    revise everyday even if it's just for 10 mins
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    Don't waste free periods, use school resources and read around the subjects, read the examiners reports on past papers (the people marking your final exam basically saying everything they want to see, why waste that), past papers, ask for help if you need it. Trust me it will fly bye work hard, wish you luck with your choices well done with your GCSEs!
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    best tip is don't waste frees
    As much as it seems cool having a 2hr lunch, at least use 75% of your frees for studying!!
    I wish I had done that from the start!
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    Start revising as soon as your lessons start. It doesn't have to be long- it can literally be 30 mins- 45 mins but just go over topics and memorise. If you do this, you can at least move onto past papers faster.
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    (Original post by lucy.wright)
    Yesterday I received my GCSE results and was very happy with what I got. I got 1B, 9A and 1A* which means I was accepted into my sixth form of choice. I intend to study English literature, Spanish, maths, biology and general studies. I really want to do well in my AS/A Levels so are there any tips I should know about?
    ) X
    Hi Lucy,

    I've just finished my first year of sixth form and got AAAC in my AS grades, hoping to apply for Oxford for Biological Sciences. Your results are great - congratulations! Prepare for a lot of work, and I don't say that lightly.

    First of all, the biggest mistake I made last year was my initial subject choices. What people don't tell you after GCSE results is that you must pick subjects which COMPLEMENT each other from a university standpoint. I chose English Literature, Biology, Psychology and Chemistry, and found this stupid combination of subjects to prove incomprehensibly annoying and problem-causing further along down the line. Don't necessarily follow my career's advisor's advice of just "do what you enjoy". If you have a particular subject you wish to study, get online and find out if you are taking the right subjects for that course, otherwise you are automatically ruling yourself out 2 years early!

    Also, General Studies is not usually accepted or credited by most universities. I have personally never studied it, but if it's going to eat up a lot of your time, my advice would be to not study it at all. Instead, invest time into an Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) in your FIRST year. I planned to do mine during 2nd year and I am already regretting it. EPQs look miles better on applications than GS, and you can tailor them to suit your interests.

    In terms of general work, my biggest tip is constant notes. All year. Absolutely vital in my opinion. I regret massively not using my free periods (particularly September - December time) to copy up work from class into neat, understandable notes. Spend as much time as possible throughout the year reviewing stuff you have learnt recently. Eg, you learn about the structure of amino acids in like September, but by the end of the year, when there is a huge surge of information and stress, it can be impossible to remember. If you spent those first few months really getting to grips with the basics, those beautiful concise notes from September can be a lifesaver in May. Trust me - here I am in the summer holidays still writing up cell structure notes from week 3.

    Organisation is a big one too. Get yourself to WHSmith and buy four (or five) coloured ring binder folders to correspond to your subjects. File dividers are an absolute must - for Lit you'll need separate spaces for each book/play/poet, and for Bio you'll most likely have four separate units. My friends who study maths find it particularly useful to have plastic wallets for class notes, to separate the work from the all important past paper questions. Download the specification for each subject onto all your devices - a lifesaver for when you want to tick off topics on the go. Organise all work in each folder in the order of the specification and invest in a sturdy hole punch

    Assuming you want to go onto university, a few application tips to finish this mammoth of a reply off. My head of sixth emphasised all year long how important it is to do supercurricular (not extracurricular) activities outside of the classroom. Public lectures, work experience, wider reading (books, journals, magazines), trips to museums may seem like the last thing you want to do, but the majority of my year ignored this advice and I cannot tell you how much they are struggling now with their personal statements. I dragged myself to Newcastle University on dark November nights to watch a hour's worth of some guy talk about neuroscience, and although I hated every minute, it's something to talk about now. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are also a lesser known fantastic way to spice up your application a bit. Oh and if possible, use your Wednesday afternoons (Enrichment) to actually do something - we watched Netflix on my friend's laptop and wished we just sucked up student journalism now.

    Sorry about the length of this reply, but I'm a big fan of not letting other people make the same mistakes as me. Hope this helps you somewhat, and honestly if you (or anyone else starting AS) wants any advice, don't hesitate to ask. I have a wealth of bad decisions and good advice ahaha

    Good luck this year!
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    how did you find A Level Chemistry and would you recommend it?
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    (Original post by JordanClarkevii)
    how did you find A Level Chemistry and would you recommend it?
    Ahahaha where do I begin with A-Level Chemistry... Well that was my C grade, four marks away from a B. It's just not the subject for me.

    GCSE Chemistry is a big fat lie. Aside from the outright mistruths you are taught, you're also used to a lot of fact-learning. A-Level is 90% application and 10% fact learning.

    Unless you really genuinely enjoy Chemistry then I wouldn't recommend it. For Chemical Engineering, Medicine, Vet and Dentistry applicants, this is a MUST. If you aren't planning on directly using or needing Chemistry in the future then honestly it is not worth the stress.

    What was your GCSE grade? I got an A* in all three units at GCSE and got a C at AS ahaha good times. Really consider this one the most - my friends all agree that Chemistry and Physics are harder than Maths - and as I said before, subject choice really is the most important thing going.
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    (Original post by JordanClarkevii)
    how did you find A Level Chemistry and would you recommend it?
    Oh my.....A level Chemistry, where to begin. (The one subject which screwed me up in A2 was undoubtedly chemistry. Managed to get a B in it when I needed an A.)

    You start the year finding out that everything you've learn thus far in Chemistry had been a complete lie.

    And then they bring in some crap that doesn't even make sense. A lot of AS was memory work if I'm being completely honest.

    Personally, I would say it is the hardest A level I've done (My others were Maths, German and Biology) but that being said, once you get your head around the stuff, it can get pretty do-able.

    Best of Luck in your AS levels Use these two years wisely because they go by so so quickly!
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    I made a thread dedicated to this: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4197729
 
 
 
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