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    Well, results day was yesterday, and I got a B grade in Art. I'm going to Sixth Form and Fine Art is one of my subjects and I want to know the differences between A-Level and GCSE? I know A-Levels are much harder, but I'm just wondering how difficult, because I'm not the best when it comes to drawing and things like that.. Before I start I have to complete an A6 "clutter" sketchbook, and I've literally got no idea what to do, and I worry that on the first day I'll turn up to a class and my work would be 1000000% mediocre (to put it lightly..) compared to everyone else's and I'd fail.. I DO NOT want to fail..

    Anyone advise? Thanks in advance!!
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    As a current A level art student i can tell you that there is a noticeable difference between gcse and A level. At A level art there is still a significant amount of coursework (filling in journals etc). There is a lot of experimenting involved so don't worry if drawing isn't your strength. There is plenty of opportunity to choose any media you want to work with. In addition it is slightly more independent as you have to put in the effort. There is a lot of annotation and writing involved, which is a change from gcse.
    Don't worry about your skills because when i started i wasn't too good, but you develop those skills and get a lot better after a year. just enjoy the subject.
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    It depends. It is both easy and hard for me. There are noticeable gap between the GCSE and A-level standard.

    You have to produce a lot of coursework, experimental methods and research/annotation in developing your idea of given theme. Also, you have to use a lot of your independent time to produce works, so really, effort is the key.

    You don't have to use drawings as your main technique, there is a lot of techniques available including chalks, pastel, plastering, clay etc. Although, you can add in your drawings to show the development of your skills. (Don't worry at the fact it is beyond your standard, because it will get better by the more you draw).

    The most important thing in art is to explore and develop your ideas! And to enjoy the subject too!
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    Thanks! I googled A-Level Fine Art sketchbooks and the work it comes up with is phenomenal and I'm just worried if I don't produce work like that then it'll just be a complete joke.. I am taking English Literature too, because I love it, so all the writing, etc won't be a problem, it's just the actual art itself haha..

    Also, sorry for the late reply, I didn't get any notifications that this thread had received replies..
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    (Original post by FreshBread101)
    Thanks! I googled A-Level Fine Art sketchbooks and the work it comes up with is phenomenal and I'm just worried if I don't produce work like that then it'll just be a complete joke.. I am taking English Literature too, because I love it, so all the writing, etc won't be a problem, it's just the actual art itself haha..
    Before I had started the course, I had googled them and believe me, I felt disheartened because I know my ability doesn't compare to theirs. I got worried about failing but joke on me, I got higher grade than expected.

    Looking back, I wish I could smack that type of thinking down. Everyone's ability in art are very different, with different styles and methods of working. Really, the moral is that other people's work don't define your work AND don't compare yourself to others too.

    Sure, their work is phenomenal but your work is also phenomenal itself - if you just believe in it.

    (Like I said in earlier comment, the most important thing is that you do explore and develop your ideas, and enjoy the subject.)
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    (Original post by FreshBread101)
    Thanks! I googled A-Level Fine Art sketchbooks and the work it comes up with is phenomenal and I'm just worried if I don't produce work like that then it'll just be a complete joke.. I am taking English Literature too, because I love it, so all the writing, etc won't be a problem, it's just the actual art itself haha..

    Also, sorry for the late reply, I didn't get any notifications that this thread had received replies..
    Never ever do that :lol: trust me lol, did that whilst i was doing all nighters towards the end and honestly it just makes you demoralised.
    Plus art is all so subjective that even if you have a totally different style to what is shown you can still achieve high marks.

    in terms of what it is like well erm im not entirely sure what exam board you would be doing but here is my advice:

    -STRAIGHT into it, like seriously. I started over the year 11 summer holiday and im very pleased i did because it put me ahead. I always like to have a thing which i have called a buffer because it allows you to get sick etc. Because no matter how hard you try spanners are always going to be thrown in the works, this could be illness (happened twice to me both quite serious and the last thing you want to be doing when you have a fever is doing a prep sheet) or other coursework deadlines (especially if you say you are going to do english). If you havent started it yet dw but make sure you get straight into it when you go back from day 1.
    -First of all is your coursework element (again im just going off of my own exam board here). You will be required to complete at least one good quality sketchbook, how you fill this is up to you really just dont fill it with crap for the sake of it make each page count.
    -Remember that although it is quality rightly or wrongly the examiners also want quantity. Unfortunately this means that no matter how good you are at art you will need to do a lot of it. Fortunately if you can draw high quality and quickly then you will be ok but take into account how long it will take you to do each piece for your prep work and give yourself enough time to do it and yes that does mean all nighters etc but tbh you should only need to do that a couple of times if you get enough done earlier in the year.
    -Get your coursework done to your schools deadline. Honestly there is a reason this deadline is there and that is because you still have to do your exam project. So get all your CW done including final pieces a couple of weeks before your exam prep is released from the exam board as this will give you a breather and you will appreciate it at the end when after the exam everyone is going back to their CW and you can just concentrate on your other subjects knowing art is done.
    -Dont think because of the new linear course AS doesn't count. Even if it doesn't officially 'count' your grade will still be displayed on UCAS and more importantly AS is a good builder for AS, now you know how hard you need to work to get that A or A* at A2.
    AS:
    1) Coursework (set theme by the school but you can choose your own topic within that margin) = sketchbook, prep sheets (1 or 2) and final piece
    2)Exam project (starts about the end of February i think) = sketchbook (not expected to be as full), prep sheets (1 or 2) and final piece (done in a 10 hour exam, 5 hours a day in controlled conditions)

    A2:
    1) personal investigation (the fun bit ), get to choose ANYTHING you want = Sketchbook, prep sheets (more) and final piece
    2)A2 exam project (same principle as AS just more of it and at a higher level, the exam is 15 hours spread over 3 days as far as im aware)

    Good luck
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    Thank you! Reading these have calmed my nerves a bit, and my GCSE was AQA so I would imagine it would be the same.
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    (Original post by FreshBread101)
    Well, results day was yesterday, and I got a B grade in Art. I'm going to Sixth Form and Fine Art is one of my subjects and I want to know the differences between A-Level and GCSE? I know A-Levels are much harder, but I'm just wondering how difficult, because I'm not the best when it comes to drawing and things like that.. Before I start I have to complete an A6 "clutter" sketchbook, and I've literally got no idea what to do, and I worry that on the first day I'll turn up to a class and my work would be 1000000% mediocre (to put it lightly..) compared to everyone else's and I'd fail.. I DO NOT want to fail..

    Anyone advise? Thanks in advance!!
    Hi FreshBread!

    As you level up from GCSE to A-level the gap can be quite big, but at the same time, look at it this way as you are progressing through school you are refining your chocies more and more, and therefore choosing those you are more interested in over the others you are not.

    You also get more free periods, use the time to work on your subjects and once you dive straight into it you will find it was not as different as you expect.

    The main differences I felt was just more annotation, analysis and more artists research. Developments is just part of the process and should always be refining your ideas better and better similar to GCSE. Everyone has their own style as well, so do not feel worried about what everyone else has too

    To summarise, enjoy your work really dedicate yourself and you will find you will cope just as well as you did in GCSE. Your work just builds more depth as you work more and more into it. What shocks people the most is suddenly the independence you have, Teachers will no longer be chasing you for work, this is to prepare you for university where teachers will no longer even check on you, you either do the work or don't. The system is build to eventually ease you into working world where everything is down to you. So if you evolve along with it, become more independent, take the initiative towards your work, you will be fine

    Hope this has helped!
    Jay
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    (Original post by Ravensbourne)
    Hi FreshBread!

    As you level up from GCSE to A-level the gap can be quite big, but at the same time, look at it this way as you are progressing through school you are refining your chocies more and more, and therefore choosing those you are more interested in over the others you are not.

    You also get more free periods, use the time to work on your subjects and once you dive straight into it you will find it was not as different as you expect.

    The main differences I felt was just more annotation, analysis and more artists research. Developments is just part of the process and should always be refining your ideas better and better similar to GCSE. Everyone has their own style as well, so do not feel worried about what everyone else has too

    To summarise, enjoy your work really dedicate yourself and you will find you will cope just as well as you did in GCSE. Your work just builds more depth as you work more and more into it. What shocks people the most is suddenly the independence you have, Teachers will no longer be chasing you for work, this is to prepare you for university where teachers will no longer even check on you, you either do the work or don't. The system is build to eventually ease you into working world where everything is down to you. So if you evolve along with it, become more independent, take the initiative towards your work, you will be fine

    Hope this has helped!
    Jay
    Thank you!! I had my third art lesson today and I have to copy Escher's Hand with Reflecting Sphere, and after looking at the image, I just panic.. I know to get better is to keep practising I was only three days into Sixth Form and I was already stressed so much about it and now I've got a cold.. (and Biology...) because I felt like I need to do phenomenal work and if I don't I'll get booted off the course.. (I also have to retake my Maths and English Language, so I'm not dedicating ALL of my time to it until after November - so I can use that excuse for now hehe)

    As soon as I read 'Hi FreshBread' made me realise how badly I need to change my username..
 
 
 
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