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    I received a B in my gcse English lit, and I want to do a-level English lit next year but after reading the first few pages of Jane Austin's 'Sense and Sensibility' one of the required books for my course next year, the text was very advanced and difficult for me to understand. So I would like advice on wether i should still take on literature next year and if the difficulty of the text will be something i learn to work on as i adjust to alevels? Thanks.
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    I think it's difficult to comment on your adaptability to what is a considerable leap in education terms. Reading a few pages of a complexed book isn't the best way to assess your ability. You've achieved a B, which is pretty good. Literature I feel is about relating to the novel, which can only be done as one reads further. Teachers will be there to help, to explain certain parts of the novel and simplify technical terms. For the exam and coursework, I believe one can choose from a set of novels, thus one can have a slight peruse and find a novel that relates to them. I hope you have a lovely weekend, I'm here to help
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    (Original post by B16LBW)
    I think it's difficult to comment on your adaptability to what is a considerable leap in education terms. Reading a few pages of a complexed book isn't the best way to assess your ability. You've achieved a B, which is pretty good. Literature I feel is about relating to the novel, which can only be done as one reads further. Teachers will be there to help, to explain certain parts of the novel and simplify technical terms. For the exam and coursework, I believe one can choose from a set of novels, thus one can have a slight peruse and find a novel that relates to them. I hope you have a lovely weekend, I'm here to help
    Thank you for your response. I understand I should read further into the novel, however my only issue is I have until Thursday to come to a final decision onto which A-levels I decide to do, and as I enjoy English literature I don't want to give up just yet. Thanks again for your response.
    So I was wondering if you know any other ways I can prepare for the jump between gcse English Lit and A-level.
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    English Literature is highly comprised of reading and analysing, hence the term literature. I find that preparation differs, I feel that with GCSE, one is used to 10-13 subjects, with a low volume for each subject. However, at A Level, one generally has 3-4 subjects with a higher volume, by volume, I refer to time allocation and reading/revision/comprehension required. A timetable and organised plan is always helpful, trying to stick to it will pay dividends in the long term. If you truly enjoy it, it's something in your favour, you're more likely to prosper.


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    English Literature is highly comprised of reading and analysing, hence the term literature. I find that preparation differs across the board, I feel that at GCSE level, one is used to 10-13 subjects, with a low volume for each subject. However, at A Level, one generally has 3-4 subjects with a higher volume, by volume, I refer to time allocation and reading/revision/comprehension required. A timetable and organised plan is always helpful, trying to stick to it will pay dividends in the long term. If you truly enjoy it, it's something in your favour, you're more likely to prosper.


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    (Original post by B16LBW)
    English Literature is highly comprised of reading and analysing, hence the term literature. I find that preparation differs across the board, I feel that at GCSE level, one is used to 10-13 subjects, with a low volume for each subject. However, at A Level, one generally has 3-4 subjects with a higher volume, by volume, I refer to time allocation and reading/revision/comprehension required. A timetable and organised plan is always helpful, trying to stick to it will pay dividends in the long term. If you truly enjoy it, it's something in your favour, you're more likely to prosper.


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    Thanks for the advice, and I'll work to organise my work and be prepared to work hard.
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    (Original post by _Hafsa)
    I received a B in my gcse English lit, and I want to do a-level English lit next year but after reading the first few pages of Jane Austin's 'Sense and Sensibility' one of the required books for my course next year, the text was very advanced and difficult for me to understand. So I would like advice on wether i should still take on literature next year and if the difficulty of the text will be something i learn to work on as i adjust to alevels? Thanks.
    In my English Lit GCSE, I got a C in my paper that was eventually remarked up to a B. I just got full marks in my AS English lit exam. Don't let your GCSE exam result put you off!!
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    (Original post by _Hafsa)
    I received a B in my gcse English lit, and I want to do a-level English lit next year but after reading the first few pages of Jane Austin's 'Sense and Sensibility' one of the required books for my course next year, the text was very advanced and difficult for me to understand. So I would like advice on wether i should still take on literature next year and if the difficulty of the text will be something i learn to work on as i adjust to alevels? Thanks.
    The difficulties might be because of context, most sixth forms allow you to have 6 weeks to trial out and changing A-levels, so can seee. I do lit and Lang and thought the books in the first 4 weeks were hard to analyse but after that by analysing skills increased and by exam season I became a "sensitive" reader and amazing analyser
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    (Original post by theravadaz)
    In my English Lit GCSE, I got a C in my paper that was eventually remarked up to a B. I just got full marks in my AS English lit exam. Don't let your GCSE exam result put you off!!
    Hopefully I will progress as well as you did. Thanks for the advice 😊
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    (Original post by BunnyMidnight)
    The difficulties might be because of context, most sixth forms allow you to have 6 weeks to trial out and changing A-levels, so can seee. I do lit and Lang and thought the books in the first 4 weeks were hard to analyse but after that by analysing skills increased and by exam season I became a "sensitive" reader and amazing analyser
    Thank you for the advice, hopefully I will be able to develop my skills as well as you.
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    (Original post by _Hafsa)
    Thank you for the advice, hopefully I will be able to develop my skills as well as you.
    It took most of year, maybe you will be faster than me; to develop and expand on that skill.
    I hope you enjoy English Lit!
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    I wouldnt be worried about the jump. If you like books and are interested in them, then you will be fine. Nu the time you come to do your exams then you will have gone over your set texts a number of times amd have a much clearer idea of what the examiner is looking for and a greater feel for the book.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    I wouldnt be worried about the jump. If you like books and are interested in them, then you will be fine. Nu the time you come to do your exams then you will have gone over your set texts a number of times amd have a much clearer idea of what the examiner is looking for and a greater feel for the book.
    Thank you, I did forget that I will be covering this book for two years so I will hopefully be very familiar with it.
 
 
 
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