Feel like students are very negative about jobs after university?!

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    I dont know about what you think but I feel like people are so desperate and negative about life in general after uni. Hard to find an intership, hard to find a job if whatever your subject, or if you havent got a 2:1 or more, hard to find a "well paid" job in your chosen area (ending up in retail). I feel confused sometimes because after if you say I will go straight to work, aprentenship after A-level, people say it's hard to get a job/ employer.
    Since the 21th century really has begun the youth mood has gone down and down I feel. Is it just an big impression or is everybody negative towards this society, feeling lile they have got no future?
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    I agree, people are such downers.

    I am quite optimistic.
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    (Original post by ElsMoll)
    I dont know about what you think but I feel like people are so desperate and negative about life in general after uni. Hard to find an intership, hard to find a job if whatever your subject, or if you havent got a 2:1 or more, hard to find a "well paid" job in your chosen area (ending up in retail). I feel confused sometimes because after if you say I will go straight to work, aprentenship after A-level, people say it's hard to get a job/ employer.
    Since the 21th century really has begun the youth mood has gone down and down I feel. Is it just an big impression or is everybody negative towards this society, feeling lile they have got no future?
    We have gotten pretty shafted as a generation.

    Over saturated universities have caused a problem. The only degrees that count are STEM degrees from the cream of the crop universities with anything under a 2:1 being a setback.

    This sets your work experience back about 3 years as getting a job part time is pretty hard let alone managing it around study for that 'STEM' degree.

    House-prices in Greater London at least, mean that unless your born into wealth the prospect of home ownership is like winning the lottery. 250K-500K prior to interest means unless you have steady income of 45-75k you wont be considered for a mortgage. Thats prior to a 50k down-payments.

    The reality is jobs are painfully hard to get even with those good degrees. It will be ardous but you might make it and secure a decentish 20-25k grad job after working in retail for a year; on minimum wage at home.

    Now you gotta cough up for the rent which can be anywhere from 5k-15k a year depending on the city you live in.

    God Forbid you want to own and insure your own car after working so hard which will most likely add 5k to the mix. LOL that is if you managed to pay for the almost 1.5k learning to drive costs.

    I dont think people are negative I think they are realising its harder that it has been and should be. I think in fact the lack of expectation is liberation from a false goal.

    I compare myself to my parents, If I have 10k saved up in the bank with a steady stream of income and a roof over my head I would have made it in my opinion.

    I am grateful I am British and no matter what my worst case scenario isnt too bad.

    But its just a long painful tedious road with the dreams of old being reserved for those select few who are lucky.
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    Going from an easy life of studying, getting paid by the goverment, partying, part time work, endless social life, societys, sports, etc. etc.

    To a life of fulltime work and responsibilities..

    No surprise many are not to positive!
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    The vast majority of students feel they are entitled to walk straight into a high paying job upon graduation, and thus do not bother applying for internships or part time jobs.

    Because of this abhorrent attitude, they graduate with nothing on their CV but a degree grade, and are therefore rejected from these jobs due to lack of experience.

    They then, instead of coming up with a plan B and applying for minimum wage jobs or voluntary work, decide to sit on their backsides all day, whining about how hard done by they are and making no effort to improve their situation.

    To cut a long story short, those who find themselves unemployed after graduation only have themselves to blame. Students need to get their priorities straight and lose the entitled attitude.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    The vast majority of students feel they are entitled to walk straight into a high paying job upon graduation, and thus do not bother applying for internships or part time jobs.

    Because of this abhorrent attitude, they graduate with nothing on their CV but a degree grade, and are therefore rejected from these jobs due to lack of experience.

    They then, instead of coming up with a plan B and applying for minimum wage jobs or voluntary work, decide to sit on their backsides all day, whining about how hard done by they are and making no effort to improve their situation.

    To cut a long story short, those who find themselves unemployed after graduation only have themselves to blame. Students need to get their priorities straight and lose the entitled attitude.
    This^

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    But seriously, its pretty dire right now for young people:

    - Job security non existant for many
    - Unpayed internships and similar extortion normal
    - Huge mass of similarly qualified individuals with little real training/skills
    - Zero hours contracts and shift work common
    - Income levels stagnant for years
    - Much much harder to buy a house then our parents/grandparents
    - Likely to retire much later
    - More likely to rent for longer
    - Having babies older
    - Marrying less
    - More likely to have to live with our parents

    top it all off with
    - First generation since records began that are forcast to earn less over the course of their lives then their parents did..

    So yeah, life on average is pretty tough out there for a 20 something who aims to lead an adult life..

    All you can do is work harder, think smarter, be better then the average 20 something, and try and avoid the mess many are falling into..
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    This generation is shafted just as much as the last generation. This isn't the 1950s any more where a job can be walked in - You need experience to get a job and you can't get a job without experience.

    This has been the same since at least the early 90s.

    Too many people are going to university as a rite of passage, taking a course with no real goal as to what they want to do afterwards and no real passion for the subject. They pick a course like Media Studies(Of which more graduates came out of England last year than there were jobs in all of Europe in that field), put in minimum effort and then wonder why they haven't been provided a high paying job.

    Getting a first is possible. It is likely, even, given a little hard work and planning.

    If you want to be successful, I would recommend the following:

    1) Pick a course based upon a concrete plan. It's okay to pick a Media Studies course if you have a plan on how you're going to use it or you don't care what job you get afterwards, but don't pick a course with few prospects and no plan and then bemoan the fact that you have a bad job.

    2) Start working on your assignments the moment you get them. Don't push them off.

    3) Talk to your tutor if you're stuck - Do so immediately. Waiting until the last moment will result in a poor assignment and increase stress dramatically.

    4) Don't do group assignments with your friend from 6th form who does nothing but make you laugh. If you do, you'll have a great time but end up losing that first and squeaking by on your assignment. Do your assignments with the guy who -actually knows what he's talking about and is doing well in class-.

    Just be organized, don't put your assignments off and choose assignment partners based on competence rather than banter, get help when you need it.

    That's it. That's the guide to getting a first.

    And don't go to uni because you have no idea what else you want to do. Go to Uni because you care about what you're doing.
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    (Original post by ThatOldGuy)
    This generation is shafted just as much as the last generation. This isn't the 1950s any more where a job can be walked in - You need experience to get a job and you can't get a job without experience.

    This has been the same since at least the early 90s.

    Too many people are going to university as a rite of passage, taking a course with no real goal as to what they want to do afterwards and no real passion for the subject. They pick a course like Media Studies(Of which more graduates came out of England last year than there were jobs in all of Europe in that field), put in minimum effort and then wonder why they haven't been provided a high paying job.

    Getting a first is possible. It is likely, even, given a little hard work and planning.

    If you want to be successful, I would recommend the following:

    1) Pick a course based upon a concrete plan. It's okay to pick a Media Studies course if you have a plan on how you're going to use it or you don't care what job you get afterwards, but don't pick a course with few prospects and no plan and then bemoan the fact that you have a bad job.

    2) Start working on your assignments the moment you get them. Don't push them off.

    3) Talk to your tutor if you're stuck - Do so immediately. Waiting until the last moment will result in a poor assignment and increase stress dramatically.

    4) Don't do group assignments with your friend from 6th form who does nothing but make you laugh. If you do, you'll have a great time but end up losing that first and squeaking by on your assignment. Do your assignments with the guy who -actually knows what he's talking about and is doing well in class-.

    Just be organized, don't put your assignments off and choose assignment partners based on competence rather than banter, get help when you need it.

    That's it. That's the guide to getting a first.

    And don't go to uni because you have no idea what else you want to do. Go to Uni because you care about what you're doing.
    A First =academic success but youve not mentioned the need to get work experience which arguably outweighs a degree? Tbh in grand scale of things get a first may set you apart but its not going to make a huge difference as an undergrad only skims the surface of specialist knowledge.

    Also,its not easy for students to be positive if they've done work experience and worked hard and cant break into a competitive industry or get a job they want...
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    (Original post by scrawlx101)
    A First =academic success but youve not mentioned the need to get work experience which arguably outweighs a degree? Tbh in grand scale of things get a first may set you apart but its not going to make a huge difference as an undergrad only skims the surface of specialist knowledge.

    Also,its not easy for students to be positive if they've done work experience and worked hard and cant break into a competitive industry or get a job they want...
    Competitive industries usually do not suddenly become so. If you want in to banking or entertainment be aware that so do many others. If you aren't better than the rest, luckier or have connections, look elsewhere. People know that it will be competitive going in.
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    As mentioned by pp's, those students that have done their research and career planning, and have actively sought out relevant work experience opportunities do not share the negative outlook as that described in the OP. Not in my circles anyway.

    Why wouldn't I be able to gain employment in a profession which I am qualified AND experienced in?
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I agree, people are such downers.

    I am quite optimistic.
    Yep Im trying to be too.
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    Well when I was at school at GCSE level talking to career advisers, I was asked what I wanted to do.... I was shafted by my school due to them refusing to place me in correct sets (due to me moving from a different area and them finding my results 6 months into year 10). As a result I couldn't enter IT as my ICT course was capped at a D (A level at my sixth form required a C).

    When I said I didn't know what to do they said why not simply decide during A levels. During A levels with their career advisers, I still didn't know, so they suggested why not go to uni.... At uni I still didn't know and I only talked to anyone in my third year, which by then it was mostly too late. I did almost start a career using my degree in the military, but after 6 months of effort I was rejected due to failing the medical due to unknown underlying health issues.

    I'm now a year out of uni with a 2:1, no idea how to even use my degree to my advantage or what jobs to go for. Being older and wiser, I now see a wide variety of apprenticeship jobs that a younger me would of loved to of chosen as a career. But sadly our generation were sold the line of 'work hard in school, go college, go uni and you'll do well'.

    It's only now, once we've left uni that it's apparent it was not true at all.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    The vast majority of students feel they are entitled to walk straight into a high paying job upon graduation, and thus do not bother applying for internships or part time jobs.

    Because of this abhorrent attitude, they graduate with nothing on their CV but a degree grade, and are therefore rejected from these jobs due to lack of experience.

    They then, instead of coming up with a plan B and applying for minimum wage jobs or voluntary work, decide to sit on their backsides all day, whining about how hard done by they are and making no effort to improve their situation.

    To cut a long story short, those who find themselves unemployed after graduation only have themselves to blame. Students need to get their priorities straight and lose the entitled attitude.
    you act as if people that don't have internship/part time jobs/work experience didn't try.

    reality is loads of people apply from the their second year, fail and apply in their third year then fail again ending up out of uni with no job.

    sure there are people that don't 'try' but many do and are still in that position.
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    this thread is so depressing im about to start uni in september baiiiiiiiiii :creep:
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    (Original post by ElsMoll)
    I dont know about what you think but I feel like people are so desperate and negative about life in general after uni. Hard to find an intership, hard to find a job if whatever your subject, or if you havent got a 2:1 or more, hard to find a "well paid" job in your chosen area (ending up in retail). I feel confused sometimes because after if you say I will go straight to work, aprentenship after A-level, people say it's hard to get a job/ employer.
    Since the 21th century really has begun the youth mood has gone down and down I feel. Is it just an big impression or is everybody negative towards this society, feeling lile they have got no future?
    Good point. I worked hard at uni for my degree, and now i can't find a job for the life of me. So am considering post graduate study. Sounds about right...
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    (Original post by z33)
    this thread is so depressing im about to start uni in september baiiiiiiiiii :creep:
    Me too I am about to start uni, just wanted to know because I read a thread about overrated degree and it was so negative. Thats why I started this thread. Sorry
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Good point. I worked hard at uni for my degree, and now i can't find a job for the life of me. So am considering post graduate study. Sounds about right...
    Maybe. Goood luck😄
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    (Original post by ElsMoll)
    Me too I am about to start uni, just wanted to know because I read a thread about overrated degree and it was so negative. Thats why I started this thread. Sorry
    Hey don't be sorry, humans tend to be pessimists by nature I'm sure we'll be fine
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    (Original post by BabyLadDarren)
    you act as if people that don't have internship/part time jobs/work experience didn't try.

    reality is loads of people apply from the their second year, fail and apply in their third year then fail again ending up out of uni with no job.

    sure there are people that don't 'try' but many do and are still in that position.
    You should be applying for part time jobs/work experience as soon as you turn 16. Second year of uni is way to late to start applying for these roles.

    Internships, yes - but it's the previous experience that often gets you the internship. So if someone who hasn't bothered getting a part time job is rejected from an internship then that's on them.
 
 
 
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