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    Hi there. I received my GCSE results this week and was happy with them. However I didn't obtain the A grade that my local sixth form recommend in order to succeed in A level mathematics. Does anybody have experience of A-Level maths? Would I do ok with a B in GCSE?

    Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by f_floyd00)
    Hi there. I received my GCSE results this week and was happy with them. However I didn't obtain the A grade that my local sixth form recommend in order to succeed in A level mathematics. Does anybody have experience of A-Level maths? Would I do ok with a B in GCSE?

    Thanks in advance.
    People in my year with A* at GCSEs ended up with Us in AS maths... it really depends if you understood the concepts. However, I have heard of people who got a B at GCSE ending up with A*A* in maths and fmaths a2...

    It depends how motivated and determined you are. I personally didn't see much of a leap between gcse and as maths but the majority of people I know did...

    You might be at a bit of a disadvantage when first starting compared to your peers, so make sure you are prepared to put extra effort into it. Maths is probably the most rewarding A level as progress can be clearly seen!

    Good luck!
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    A level maths is a big step up from GCSE! The concepts become a lot harder to grasp and require a lot of work to achieve good grades!
    My a level teacher said that people who got a B at GCSE would definitely struggle to keep up! But then again people who got As and A*s struggled to keep up too! If you are willing to work hard and out the effort in it could be an option! If you really want to do it then you may be able to but hard work will be necessary!
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    (Original post by f_floyd00)
    Hi there. I received my GCSE results this week and was happy with them. However I didn't obtain the A grade that my local sixth form recommend in order to succeed in A level mathematics. Does anybody have experience of A-Level maths? Would I do ok with a B in GCSE?

    Thanks in advance.
    Yes you will be fine. As Jitesh said, I know people who got an A* in GCSE maths, thought they were too good for AS maths so didnt revise that much, and ended up with a B. Its all about the work ethic. Me personally, I was 1 off an A* in GCSE but got a C in my December mock. I then worked really hard to do better for my AS maths and came out with a high A.
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    I'm doing A-level Maths with a B at GCSE level, too, so, if it helps encourage you, you're not the only one. I'd say just keep on top of your work, ask questions if you need too, and you'll probably be fine In fact, contrary to your experience, I spoke to the teachers at the college I'm going to, and they recommended that I give Maths a go, so there's that as well
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    Hiya. I'm currently studying mathematics at A Level and achieved a B in my maths GCSE (currently predicted A/B for my A level maths).

    Like Jitesh says, it depends on how motivated you are and how much effort you are willing to put in.Personally, I found a major leap between GCSE maths to A Level maths and the first few months were quite stressful and difficult, and I admit, I was ready to give it up by Christmas! However, with determination and effort, the concepts can become easier to understand. Most of my classmates achieved As and A*s at GCSE maths but I soon caught up with them. A Level maths requires a lot of practice and effort and can be time consuming if you want to get high grades.
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    The concepts in C1 are all the same really as GCSE. The difference is that you are expected to really understand them at A-level, rather than just memorise methods and strategies to pass a test. You have to ask yourself why you got a B. Do you really understand algebra? What is it for? Why do you need to know it? What's a quadratic? Where does it come from? Why do we solve them? What are the rules of indices? Why do we need to know them? Why is 7^0=1? That kind of thing.

    If you know why these things are, you'll find A-level simple. If not, you'll exist in a sort of fog of trying to remember methods and it won't be enjoyable.

    Why do you want to do maths anyway?
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    Hey, I think its definitely achievable. Another thing to consider as well as the grade you achieved for GCSE is the grades you were getting in class tests and mocks throughout year 11.
    Make sure you understand the A/A* GCSE topics before you start A-level maths or you'll have a lot of catching up to do when you first start.
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    (Original post by f_floyd00)
    Hi there. I received my GCSE results this week and was happy with them. However I didn't obtain the A grade that my local sixth form recommend in order to succeed in A level mathematics. Does anybody have experience of A-Level maths? Would I do ok with a B in GCSE?

    Thanks in advance.
    B at GCSE, A (3 ums of an A*, Fk c4 grade boundaries) this year so it is doable.
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    A level maths is quite a large step up from GCSE (apart from the first unit - C1) and it's easy for people that have even achieved an A/A* at GCSE to slip to E/U's at AS but it generally boils down to how well you understand the concepts and your ability to apply that knowledge.

    I'm about to start my second year at sixth form and whilst I personally didn't find it to be that big of a step up (probably because I did additional maths as well at GCSE which covered parts of C1) but there was a noticeable step up in knowledge and difficulty in the other units.

    You might find settling in a tad more difficult compared to say someone who got an A* but to be fair as long as you work hard you're going to be fine and since so many people take maths now and it's basically useful for everything if they let you take it and you want to take it then go for it!

    GOOD LUCK! ^_^
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    (Original post by Paulxo)
    The concepts in C1 are all the same really as GCSE. The difference is that you are expected to really understand them at A-level, rather than just memorise methods and strategies to pass a test. You have to ask yourself why you got a B. Do you really understand algebra? What is it for? Why do you need to know it? What's a quadratic? Where does it come from? Why do we solve them? What are the rules of indices? Why do we need to know them? Why is 7^0=1? That kind of thing.

    If you know why these things are, you'll find A-level simple. If not, you'll exist in a sort of fog of trying to remember methods and it won't be enjoyable.

    Why do you want to do maths anyway?
    Hi there, thanks for the advice! I think I'd like to do maths just because I see it as one of those subjects that just look great, and opens a lot more doors than if I didn't have it.
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    It depends on your chosen sixth form - mine was small and they let people in with Cs. Some struggled and some succeeded, it depends on the hours you put in.

    I recommend buying the CGP student books (not the revision guides). They're about £10-15 each, one per module. The pink Pearson ones are useful near the end of the year, too. Examsolutions website - use it. Try to go to the Manchester uni a level maths days if you can, about two weeks before your exam.
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    A level math is apparently more difficult than university level mathematics according to a close family friend.
    He got straight As and A*s in GCSE and really struggled with maths in A level.
    His advice is if you don't need it, don't do it. If you do need it, work really hard and be prepared to spend hours revising because it is extremely difficult.
    My sister got a B in math GCSE and went to do math A level, she dropped out after a few months.
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    Thanks for the help everybody. Defienitley going to do it now, best start on the 8 week overdue maths homework.
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    (Original post by soup001)
    A level math is apparently more difficult than university level mathematics according to a close family friend.
    I'm not sure about university degree level of mathematics, but I would find it hard to believe that a mathematician would say a level maths is harder than university level maths...
    Have you seen the difficulty of STEP? People who get A*s in maths and fmaths struggle with STEP III... That's real maths... more like university maths.
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    If you didn't get an A in GCSE maths you will most likely fail (get a U) at AS level. My teacher showed me the the statistical outcomes for different GCSE grades in maths that he collected over several years at our school, and from some other schools. I think there is something like a 5% chance you'll get an A or B.

    Anecdotally, all the people I know who got B's at GCSE yet managed to get on to the course either completely dropped the subject, only did 1 or 2 modules, or got an E or U.
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    (Original post by f_floyd00)
    Hi there. I received my GCSE results this week and was happy with them. However I didn't obtain the A grade that my local sixth form recommend in order to succeed in A level mathematics. Does anybody have experience of A-Level maths? Would I do ok with a B in GCSE?

    Thanks in advance.
    Of course you can! I got a B in GCSE as well. A level Maths is not that hard if you keep practicing and keep your concepts clean and clear, it's possible to jump to an A even. Saw people with A*/A drop to D-U grades just because of inconsistencies and overconfidence. Be consistent,keep practicing and you can do it!
 
 
 
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