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    I am an aspiring child nurse. I love children and really want to make a positive difference in their lives. I don't see myself doing any other job because i am a practical hands-on person who would love to be an active participant in someone else's life.

    If and when i have my own children, i would be able to care for them in a professional manner and take care of my parents when they are older seeing as i will have some nursing knowledge.

    Having said that, i do sometimes have doubts and its because i am not a sciencey and mathsy person, so studying these might prove difficult.

    Also, i don't think i would want to be working unsocial hours and be expected to be on-call duty every time. This just puts a barrier to your social/family life.

    In addition, the pay does not seem to be good either unless you move up the ladder.

    I know money is not everything and i would put someone else's happiness over my own any day, but i would want to live a comfortable life too and provide for my family(mum and dad)

    I know that nursing is a rewarding career but its seems to be emotionally draining at the same time. I don't think i would be able to cope.

    At this poin,t I just don't know.

    I know what child nurses do etc and feel like i would like to do what they do but realistically speaking, i would prefer a 9-5 job in nursing.

    Any help/ advice will be appreciated
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    I dont study nursing myself but my sister does and shes just completed her first year. Firstly if your looking for a 9-5 nursing job there isnt one, your expected to work long hours with different rotas. I agree it is a rewarding career if you have the passion for it and it is hands on so itl be right up your street. You dont need to be a person whos into science but youl need to have basic knowledge of it. The course is mainly placement based so what you learn is all on the job. You can apply for NHS bursarys which are monthly payments which can get you through uni. Lastly if you have the passion for it and your willing to work hard go hard for it. Dont let nothing stop you. I wish you the every success in the future. X


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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I am an aspiring child nurse. I love children and really want to make a positive difference in their lives. I don't see myself doing any other job because i am a practical hands-on person who would love to be an active participant in someone else's life.

    If and when i have my own children, i would be able to care for them in a professional manner and take care of my parents when they are older seeing as i will have some nursing knowledge.

    Having said that, i do sometimes have doubts and its because i am not a sciencey and mathsy person, so studying these might prove difficult.

    Also, i don't think i would want to be working unsocial hours and be expected to be on-call duty every time. This just puts a barrier to your social/family life.

    In addition, the pay does not seem to be good either unless you move up the ladder.

    I know money is not everything and i would put someone else's happiness over my own any day, but i would want to live a comfortable life too and provide for my family(mum and dad)

    I know that nursing is a rewarding career but its seems to be emotionally draining at the same time. I don't think i would be able to cope.

    At this poin,t I just don't know.

    I know what child nurses do etc and feel like i would like to do what they do but realistically speaking, i would prefer a 9-5 job in nursing.

    Any help/ advice will be appreciated
    If i were you get experience as a HCA and you will see whether you can cope with the long hours and the emotional demands of the job. You will find it hard to get a 9-5 job unless you work in a GP surgery or maybe as a district nurse etc.

    (Original post by MohArif12)
    I dont study nursing myself but my sister does and shes just completed her first year. Firstly if your looking for a 9-5 nursing job there isnt one, your expected to work long hours with different rotas. I agree it is a rewarding career if you have the passion for it and it is hands on so itl be right up your street. You dont need to be a person whos into science but youl need to have basic knowledge of it. The course is mainly placement based so what you learn is all on the job. You can apply for NHS bursarys which are monthly payments which can get you through uni. Lastly if you have the passion for it and your willing to work hard go hard for it. Dont let nothing stop you. I wish you the every success in the future. X


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    From Sep 2017 there is no NHS Bursary it is changing into a tuition loan.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    I am an aspiring child nurse. I love children and really want to make a positive difference in their lives. I don't see myself doing any other job because i am a practical hands-on person who would love to be an active participant in someone else's life.

    If and when i have my own children, i would be able to care for them in a professional manner and take care of my parents when they are older seeing as i will have some nursing knowledge.

    Having said that, i do sometimes have doubts and its because i am not a sciencey and mathsy person, so studying these might prove difficult.

    Also, i don't think i would want to be working unsocial hours and be expected to be on-call duty every time. This just puts a barrier to your social/family life.

    In addition, the pay does not seem to be good either unless you move up the ladder.

    I know money is not everything and i would put someone else's happiness over my own any day, but i would want to live a comfortable life too and provide for my family(mum and dad)

    I know that nursing is a rewarding career but its seems to be emotionally draining at the same time. I don't think i would be able to cope.

    At this poin,t I just don't know.

    I know what child nurses do etc and feel like i would like to do what they do but realistically speaking, i would prefer a 9-5 job in nursing.

    Any help/ advice will be appreciated
    9-5 jobs in nursing are rapidly decreasing unless you work in management etc., as care is moving into the community and longer hours are being demanded of community nurses. There really is very little demand for paediatric community services. Practice nurses are often doing late evening clinics and community visits are moving towards longer shifts and more weekends. Nursing is a 24/7, 7 days a week career. This is not to say that nurses can't have a good family and social life at all, but that the balance is different.**

    Pay is better if you work unsocial hours. Those who do long shifts, nights and weekends earn significantly more than those who do the same hours on weekdays only.*
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    (Original post by chikane)
    If i were you get experience as a HCA and you will see whether you can cope with the long hours and the emotional demands of the job. You will find it hard to get a 9-5 job unless you work in a GP surgery or maybe as a district nurse etc.



    From Sep 2017 there is no NHS Bursary it is changing into a tuition loan.
    How do i get experience as a HCA
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    How do i get experience as a HCA
    I think working as a HCA is the best option for you. You apply via NHS Jobs. I would strongly advise you to make sure it is a HCA role within paediatrics, as the worlds of adukt and paeds medicine/nursing are very different.
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    Get a HCA job honestly. That's the only way youl be able to see without too much commitment. That's all I'd advise to anyone who doesn't know......also you don't look after your children professionally 😂 the way you care for your own children is a completely different level to how you would care for a child that was under your care....it's 2 completely different things. But yes please do get some voluntary or hca Itl do you a world of good!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    I think working as a HCA is the best option for you. You apply via NHS Jobs. I would strongly advise you to make sure it is a HCA role within paediatrics, as the worlds of adukt and paeds medicine/nursing are very different.
    Is it easy to get a HCA post.

    I am 18.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    9-5 jobs in nursing are rapidly decreasing unless you work in management etc., as care is moving into the community and longer hours are being demanded of community nurses. There really is very little demand for paediatric community services. Practice nurses are often doing late evening clinics and community visits are moving towards longer shifts and more weekends. Nursing is a 24/7, 7 days a week career. This is not to say that nurses can't have a good family and social life at all, but that the balance is different.**

    Pay is better if you work unsocial hours. Those who do long shifts, nights and weekends earn significantly more than those who do the same hours on weekdays only.*
    Why does nursing have to be a 24/7 job?

    If the NHS is short of nurses then why can't they employ more and train more?

    This way nurses won't have to be on call duty as everyone will be allocated to their preferred / or specific time?

    I don't understand how we need more nurses yet universities only take 50 applicants for child nursing and 250 for adult nursing out of more than 2000 students yearly.

    Some many amazing aspiring nursing students to be get turned down each year, why is that? the answers are not justifiable.

    It does not make sense, after all, most people are expected to take a loan now anyway.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Is it easy to get a HCA post.

    I am 18.
    I think the posts are quite competitive but as for the actual academic requirements, it is not particularly difficult. Most of your training will be on-the-job and you will have a competency booklet to get signed off. You may also have a competency framework type thing to do too, focusing on the theory aspect of being a HCA. (This is what our Band 2s have, anyway).
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Why does nursing have to be a 24/7 job?

    If the NHS is short of nurses then why can't they employ more and train more?

    This way nurses won't have to be on call duty as everyone will be allocated to their preferred / or specific time?

    I don't understand how we need more nurses yet universities only take 50 applicants for child nursing and 250 for adult nursing out of more than 2000 students yearly.

    Some many amazing aspiring nursing students to be get turned down each year, why is that? the answers are not justifiable.

    It does not make sense, after all, most people are expected to take a loan now anyway.
    1) Without coming across as being sarcastic or rude... Because people aren't sick only within office hours? I'm going to be honest... I'm very surprised that you have asked this question. As a prospective student nurse you really need to understand our client-base's most basic of needs. And for many of them, this is a place (A&E and then a ward/HDU or ICU) they can go if ever their condition deteriorates acutely (E.g. A diabetic going into DKA, an oncology patient with a high temperature or even a normally well child/adult who becomes acutely unwell). For many patients this can happen at any time and they need a 24/7 service. Many patients with complex needs discharged into the community also require 24/7 care - and not just from a parent/relative/family member)

    2) There isn't endless finances to fund the training. And even if there was, student nurses need appropriate placement areas. And the placement areas need signed-off, experienced mentors. Hospitals/universities are already taking their maximum capacity of student nurses. Any more and the quality of training would rapidly decrease. You could well increase the university's capacity, but to increase the healthcare infrastructure to accommodate more student nurses is impossible.

    3) I don't know what you mean by "On call duty"? Atypically Doctors spend far more time "on call" than nurses.

    4) Inevitably some good applicants are turned down for nursing but that's because there isn't the capacity to train them - as i've mentioned a bit about above. The university application process for nursing is pretty rigorous (Although I think it should be made harder).
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Why does nursing have to be a 24/7 job?

    If the NHS is short of nurses then why can't they employ more and train more?

    This way nurses won't have to be on call duty as everyone will be allocated to their preferred / or specific time?

    I don't understand how we need more nurses yet universities only take 50 applicants for child nursing and 250 for adult nursing out of more than 2000 students yearly.

    Some many amazing aspiring nursing students to be get turned down each year, why is that? the answers are not justifiable.

    It does not make sense, after all, most people are expected to take a loan now anyway.
    Nursing is 24/7 because people don't just decide to get poorly on a Monday-Friday 9-5 basis. The reason university's only take on that many is because the government cannot afford to train as many nurses as what the demand is. Now they are saying making nurses pay will open up more places thus creating more nurses but I feel it will have the opposite effect but wel soon see! What job you apply for when you qualify is completely up to you. If you don't want a job on call don't apply for it. If you'd like Monday-Friday 9-5 look at treatment room type jobs but as a previous poster said....these type of jobs aren't as popular on job sites as ward jobs will be but who knows! Also for child nursing I have no idea if that sort of job exists as I don't know much on child nursing but I've never known a treatment room dedicated to children . But during your training you'd be expected to cover all types of settings and all types of shifts. Have a look at voluntary if any hcas jobs aren't avail. Good luck
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    (Original post by wbnurse)
    Nursing is 24/7 because people don't just decide to get poorly on a Monday-Friday 9-5 basis. The reason university's only take on that many is because the government cannot afford to train as many nurses as what the demand is. Now they are saying making nurses pay will open up more places thus creating more nurses but I feel it will have the opposite effect but wel soon see! What job you apply for when you qualify is completely up to you. If you don't want a job on call don't apply for it. If you'd like Monday-Friday 9-5 look at treatment room type jobs but as a previous poster said....these type of jobs aren't as popular on job sites as ward jobs will be but who knows! Also for child nursing I have no idea if that sort of job exists as I don't know much on child nursing but I've never known a treatment room dedicated to children . But during your training you'd be expected to cover all types of settings and all types of shifts. Have a look at voluntary if any hcas jobs aren't avail. Good luck
    Children have outpatients just the same as adults. Children have day surgery just the same as adults. Both areas are 8-6 (approx) Monday to Friday.Paediatric community jobs are increasing not decreasing due to the push to keep people out of hospital and nursed in the community. Children with life-limiting syndromes are living longer and are looked after at home with MDT's that include the family and community paeds nurses who are based in hospitals and are available if those children need to be hospitalised but also support those children and families in the community.
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    (Original post by lilibet01)
    Children have outpatients just the same as adults. Children have day surgery just the same as adults. Both areas are 8-6 (approx) Monday to Friday.Paediatric community jobs are increasing not decreasing due to the push to keep people out of hospital and nursed in the community. Children with life-limiting syndromes are living longer and are looked after at home with MDT's that include the family and community paeds nurses who are based in hospitals and are available if those children need to be hospitalised but also support those children and families in the community.
    I wouldn't say all them services you have said are all Monday-Friday 9-5. All trusts are different. The trust I'm from doesn't have separate children's outpatients I've actually never heard of that. Nor do they have children's day surgery....again something I've never heard of. Community settings....again not 9-5 Monday to Friday
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    (Original post by wbnurse)
    I wouldn't say all them services you have said are all Monday-Friday 9-5. All trusts are different. The trust I'm from doesn't have separate children's outpatients I've actually never heard of that. Nor do they have children's day surgery....again something I've never heard of. Community settings....again not 9-5 Monday to Friday
    Well they certainly do in London!
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    Outpatients at the children's hospital here run clinics until 8pm and on weekends too. The NHS is moving towards this, I imagine especially with children as it makes services more accessible outside of school hours.

    As for the no social life thing, the hangover I currently have begs to differ.
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    (Original post by lilibet01)
    Well they certainly do in London!
    I'm a world away from London 😂 I still wouldn't imagine those services only run Monday to Friday....especially in London
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    Voluntary work within a hospital would be a great way to get experience, the hospital I volunteer & work at offer voluntary positions in so many different departments, so it's worth looking at what your local NHS trust offer. If you can't find HCA work at a hospital, care homes normally don't require experience, even though it's with adults, the skills are transferable to Children's Nursing & it is very rewarding.

    In regards to unsociable hours, I actually enjoy working shifts & have done for years, it's not for everyone, but working 9-5 Monday-Friday doesn't appeal to me (not to say it won't be an option in the future) so you never know it may actually appeal to you after you give it a go. And when you start early or finish late you miss the traffic !
 
 
 
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