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    If I enter uni in 2018, when should I take the Bmat?
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    Specialist Advisor
    In November 2017
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    As above.
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    What is the BMAT?
    The BMAT (Biomedical Admissions Test) is a 2 hour examination required for entry to a number of Medical Schools in the United Kingdom, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Spain and Netherlands as well as a selection of Dentistry and Biomedical Science courses.

    When is the BMAT?
    The BMAT examination can be taken on one of two dates in 2017. The first date is Saturday 9th September 2017, and is suitable for all BMAT applicants except Oxford applicants. The second BMAT examination date is Thursday 2nd November 2017; this is suitable for all BMAT applicants. Students can choose to take the BMAT examination on either one of these dates at a registered centre/school.

    Who has to take the BMAT?

    Undergraduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, Imperial College London, University College London, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Lancaster University, University of Leeds, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (Singapore), University of Malaya (Malaysia), Thammasat University CICM, (Thailand), Mahidol University (Thailand).

    Graduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Veterinary Medicine Applicants to: University of Cambridge.

    Biomedical Science Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Dentistry Applicants to: University of Leeds, Thammasat University (Thailand), University of Melbourne (Australia)


    How to Prepare for the BMAT?
    The first and most important step is to consider the BMAT like any other A-Level or GCSE examination, and ignore any mention of the BMAT as 'an examination that cannot be prepared for.' There is a statistically significant correlation between the amount one prepares for the BMAT, and one's BMAT score.

    Section 1 (Aptitude and Skills) - 35 MCQ, 60 Minutes
    Question Types: Problem Solving, Data Handling & Critical Thinking

    A) Resources - Make use of the abundance of free practice resources available for Section 1. In addition to the Official BMAT Past Papers, Oxford TSA Past Papers provide additional practice for Problem Solving questions whilst OCR Critical Thinking Unit 2 is a very useful practice resource for Critical Thinking Questions.

    B) Recognise Pitfalls - In contrast to most A-Level examinations, BMAT Section 1 is full of tricks and trips, intended to misguide students. Fortunately, there are only so-many tricks that the BMAT are able to use. Hence, each time you come across one of these, add it to your 'personal list', to avoid making the same mistake in future practice.


    Section 2 (Scientific Knowledge and Applications) - 27 MCQ, 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics

    A) Official Resource Guide - With this being the official resource guide, there really is no better resource for Section 2 preparation. Most students find it best to quickly review the whole guide and highlight any topics which they have not covered at GCSE level for further learning. Bear in mind that whilst Section 2 is supposed to be 'GCSE Level'; the examination can assess topics which you may not have covered until AS and sometimes even A2 due to variation in exam board specifications.

    B) Timing - Half the challenge of Section 2 is the limited time; hence, it essential to practice this section under strict timed conditions. Fast mental maths, confident use of fractions and a good background Biology knowledge, will ensure that you have additional time for those challenging Physics and Chemistry calculations.

    C) Resources - Once you have completed all official and BMAT specific resources, GCSE Bitesize is of some use, whilst you may wish to also consider practicing GCSE Maths Calculator papers, without a calculator in order to further improve your mental maths.


    Section 3 (Written Task) - 1 Essay (Choice of 4), 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Topical Medical Issues, Medical Ethics, Medical Philosophy, Veterinary Medicine

    A) Address all parts of the question - Each question normally has three or four parts. Regardless of how good your essay is, if you do not address all parts of the question, your essay will be capped at 3/3.5 as per the Section 3 Official Marking Criteria.

    B) Plan - With 30 minutes, and one A4 sheet provided, this section is the least time restricted. Essays which score highest are those which are well structured and address all parts of the question, bringing in additional topical examples and knowledge.


    Free BMAT Resources
    A) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 1)
    B) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 2)
    C) Past Paper Worked Solutions
    D) Section 1 Practice Questions
    E) Section 2 Practice Questions
    F) Practice Questions


    Books
    A) Preparing for the BMAT: The Official Guide to the Biomedical Admissions Test
    B) Get into Medical School. 400 BMAT Practice Questions

    (adapted from post by rmd141)
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    Free Essay Marking Service for the BMAT

    Dear Medical Students,

    My name is Maria and I'm currently studying at UCL. On behalf of Medic Mind, we are running a free essay marking service for the first 50 essays posted on The Student Room. Tag Medic Mind so we receive a notification!

    I scored 5A in my essay, and I will be at hand to help you with your essays. Don't be the one to miss out!

    Post your essay on this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...rimary_content

    Good Luck and all the best!

    Best Wishes,
    Maria
    Medic Mind
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    Hello guys can somebody please help with the following questions.

    1) A farmer always plants his cabbage patch in a square configurstion. The cabbages are planted in lines at regular intervals. This year, knowing that some of his cabbage inevitably get eaten by wild animals, he decided to plant additional cabbages. In total he planted 47 additional cabbages. How many cabbages did he place last year?

    2) A number of people are stopped at random in the street. They are asked if they have two children and also if one is a boy born on friday. After a long search, we finally find someone who answers yes to both questions. What is the probability that this person has two boys? Assume an equal chance of giving birth to either sex and equal chance of giving birth on any day.
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    (Original post by Nika01)
    Hello guys can somebody please help with the following questions.

    1) A farmer always plants his cabbage patch in a square configurstion. The cabbages are planted in lines at regular intervals. This year, knowing that some of his cabbage inevitably get eaten by wild animals, he decided to plant additional cabbages. In total he planted 47 additional cabbages. How many cabbages did he place last year?

    2) A number of people are stopped at random in the street. They are asked if they have two children and also if one is a boy born on friday. After a long search, we finally find someone who answers yes to both questions. What is the probability that this person has two boys? Assume an equal chance of giving birth to either sex and equal chance of giving birth on any day.
    Question 1. The difference of two whole number squares can't be a prime.
    Question 2. 50%, no? Or do they mean 0.5 x 6/7?
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    2010 section 1 paper help please???//
    q7,q12,q16,q18,q23,q27,q31


    thank you to anyone who attempts them and good luck aahhahha !!! they are so confusingggg
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    (Original post by Bobbyfloater)
    Question 1. The difference of two whole number squares can't be a prime.
    Question 2. 50%, no? Or do they mean 0.5 x 6/7?

    1) In order to maintain the square configuration there are only 2 ways the farmer could have planted the additional cabbages. Let's look at both scenarios:1

    1. Cabbages placed along two adjacent lines outside original cabbage patch
    n = length of square's side after adding additional cabbages
    47 = 2n -1
    n = 2424^2 = 576
    576 - 47 = 529
    To check if 529 is the right answer, it should be a square number (square rooting it gives you an integer- incidentally it's 23)

    2. Additional cabbages placed along perimeter (all four sides) of cabbage patch
    n = length of square's side after adding additional cabbages
    47 = 4n -4
    n = 12.75
    since n is not an integer, this situation isn't possible. You can't plant 0.75 of a cabbage plant!

    2) 0.5. There are two possibilities - the second child is either a boy or a girl. The chance that it's a boy (XY chromosome) is 0.5 .The part about assuming equal chance of giving birth on any day is there to throw you off.
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    (Original post by Esha.Ahmed)
    1) In order to maintain the square configuration there are only 2 ways the farmer could have planted the additional cabbages. Let's look at both scenarios:1

    1. Cabbages placed along two adjacent lines outside original cabbage patch
    n = length of square's side after adding additional cabbages
    47 = 2n -1
    n = 2424^2 = 576
    576 - 47 = 529
    To check if 529 is the right answer, it should be a square number (square rooting it gives you an integer- incidentally it's 23)

    2. Additional cabbages placed along perimeter (all four sides) of cabbage patch
    n = length of square's side after adding additional cabbages
    47 = 4n -4
    n = 12.75
    since n is not an integer, this situation isn't possible. You can't plant 0.75 of a cabbage plant!

    2) 0.5. There are two possibilities - the second child is either. a boy or a girl. The chance that it's a boy (XY chromosome) is 0.5 .The part about assuming equal chance of giving birth on any day is there to throw you off.
    I got the same answer for this but did it differently. I acknowledged that the number of cabbages in the patch must be a square number, as all the sides are the same. The difference between consecutive square numbers is always odd, and this difference increases in series too. (ie. between 4 and 9 the difference is 5; between 9 and 16 the difference is 7 etc)
    Therefore I found the 2 consecutive square numbers with a difference of 47. We can work out( by counting if necessary) that 47 is the 24th odd number---this means 24^2 must be the number of cabbages and so the previous number of cabbages must be 23^2 (529). I found this technique pretty easy but obviously its a bit tedious if you need to count loads of stuff... I don't really get your method though so i'm not sure which way is quicker :confused:
 
 
 
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