Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello!

    I'm coming up to having to decide what I want to do at University. I am really passionate about Music and Musical History and am thinking of studying it at University. I then want to do a Law Conversion Course afterwards and practise as a barrister with the opportunity of going into Politics at some point in the future. Is a Music degree looked on favourably? Would people regard it as a "Mickey Mouse" degree? Will doing a Music degree limit my chances of employment to different fields in the future such as Law or Politics? I've been told that it helps you stand out from other job applicants? But are there any disadvantages to taking this route? Really tough decision and I just want to know that by doing this, I am still able to be financially secure in the future.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    Hello!

    Most barristers (to my knowledge) have done undergrad degrees at Oxbridge. So that should be your aim, whatever the subject, if you really want to be a barrister.

    I have a former friend (we don't really talk anymore, but we're still Facebook friends ) who read music at Oxford with me, did the GDL and all the other required courses, and is now a practising barrister.

    I guess the question in your case is is it really worth all the extra debt? Why not do a law course straightaway, especially considering that you won't be able to guarantee that you will get a training contract position that will pay for you to study the GDL and LPC (and any extra courses you may need to do to become a barrister)?

    Music courses from top unis are pretty much as respected as any other arts/humanities degree from a top uni :yes:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Hello!

    Most barristers (to my knowledge) have done undergrad degrees at Oxbridge. So that should be your aim, whatever the subject, if you really want to be a barrister.

    I have a former friend (we don't really talk anymore, but we're still Facebook friends ) who read music at Oxford with me, did the GDL and all the other required courses, and is now a practising barrister.

    I guess the question in your case is is it really worth all the extra debt? Why not do a law course straightaway, especially considering that you won't be able to guarantee that you will get a training contract position that will pay for you to study the GDL and LPC (and any extra courses you may need to do to become a barrister)?

    Music courses from top unis are pretty much as respected as any other arts/humanities degree from a top uni :yes:
    I've heard that if you go to a Law Firm in your second year and do a vacation scheme with theme, they can offer you a training contract on that scheme meaning that you go into your third year knowing that you have a job when you leave university. This would include paying for the GDL and LPC. Do you think it's better to do a degree I think I'm capable of getting a Firsts in then convert?

    Thanks!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by enyi_okpara)
    I've heard that if you go to a Law Firm in your second year and do a vacation scheme with theme, they can offer you a training contract on that scheme meaning that you go into your third year knowing that you have a job when you leave university. This would include paying for the GDL and LPC. Do you think it's better to do a degree I think I'm capable of getting a Firsts in then convert?

    Thanks!
    Hi there!

    Just thought it may be useful to note that the process you've described above is for qualification as a solicitor (i.e. you work for a firm and complete a training contract), not a barrister. It's true that your solicitors firm would fund your GDL and LPC if you did obtain a training contract before leaving university, but if you're taking the barrister route then this would not actually apply to you at all. You would need to take the BPTC after university and go from there, which is not necessarily funded by anyone but yourself (even if you do get pupillage).

    In terms of music degrees, I completed multiple vacation schemes this summer and it was about 50% law degree and 50% non-law degree students. For solicitors, I don't believe it matters that much, but you'd need to be prepared to back it up. For aspiring barristers like you, I would imagine it is much the same, and traditional degrees (e.g. English, Music, History) are just as respectable as Law. What will matter more is the university you attend, so work hard and get into the best one you can this may not necessarily be Oxbridge, but any of the top universities will stand you in good stead.

    Also a final note.. I would avoid doing a music degree just because you think you will get Firsts in it! If it is something you're passionate about then that should be your reason, and I can promise you that a First in Music from a good university is by no means any easier to get than in a Law degree! Getting a First will be important if you want to be a barrister, regardless of the subject, but as a university student I can honestly say that you can never ever guarantee you will get one.

    Hope this is helpful! I studied music and then completed a law degree, so if you have any more questions I'm happy to help (although as an aspiring solicitor my knowledge of the barrister route isn't great beyond the BPTC).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by legallyblonde72)
    Hi there!

    Just thought it may be useful to note that the process you've described above is for qualification as a solicitor (i.e. you work for a firm and complete a training contract), not a barrister. It's true that your solicitors firm would fund your GDL and LPC if you did obtain a training contract before leaving university, but if you're taking the barrister route then this would not actually apply to you at all. You would need to take the BPTC after university and go from there, which is not necessarily funded by anyone but yourself (even if you do get pupillage).

    In terms of music degrees, I completed multiple vacation schemes this summer and it was about 50% law degree and 50% non-law degree students. For solicitors, I don't believe it matters that much, but you'd need to be prepared to back it up. For aspiring barristers like you, I would imagine it is much the same, and traditional degrees (e.g. English, Music, History) are just as respectable as Law. What will matter more is the university you attend, so work hard and get into the best one you can this may not necessarily be Oxbridge, but any of the top universities will stand you in good stead.

    Also a final note.. I would avoid doing a music degree just because you think you will get Firsts in it! If it is something you're passionate about then that should be your reason, and I can promise you that a First in Music from a good university is by no means any easier to get than in a Law degree! Getting a First will be important if you want to be a barrister, regardless of the subject, but as a university student I can honestly say that you can never ever guarantee you will get one.

    Hope this is helpful! I studied music and then completed a law degree, so if you have any more questions I'm happy to help (although as an aspiring solicitor my knowledge of the barrister route isn't great beyond the BPTC).
    Thank You so much for the advice! I am very passionate about music and have thought about doing it an university for quite some time as opposed to doing a Law Degree. I also wanted to ask, if for any reason funding isn't available to do the GDL and then the LPC/BPTC, how do other music graduates go about funding their subsequent courses. This is just a backup plan in case anything could go wrong! I'm hoping to apply to Oxbridge this coming October for either Music or Law!

    Thank you so much!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.