_Hafsa
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I received Bs in both English Lang&Lit. I'm aspiring to study law at either UCL, KCL or LSE and they all require A*AA at A-level. I just want to know will I be capable enough of getting at least an A at A-level English lit. Also I want to know how different is it from GCSE and pretty much anything I would need to know before I decide to pick it. My other options would be History, and Sociology. If I change my mind on English Lit, I will be picking up Government&Politics instead.
Thanks.
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_Hafsa
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Can anyone help me??

Also any advice on History, at A-level?? I received an A at History GCSE but I'm well aware that it will be a huge jump.
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Gabriela123
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I am an A level english lit student and the jump between gcse and a level english is quite significant ans you have to do more independent work and reading around the subject. Getting an A at a level in english is not impossible if you are willing to put in the effort. You have to like reading because they will tell you to read about 4 novels/plays/poems a year maybe more. There are more essays and questions at a level and you would need to memorize a lot of info and quotes for exams. I started with A in english lit at gcse and now am predicted an A at a level. You can get the grade as long as you are willing to put in the work.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by Gabriela123)
I am an A level english lit student and the jump between gcse and a level english is quite significant ans you have to do more independent work and reading around the subject. Getting an A at a level in english is not impossible if you are willing to put in the effort. You have to like reading because they will tell you to read about 4 novels/plays/poems a year maybe more. There are more essays and questions at a level and you would need to memorize a lot of info and quotes for exams. I started with A in english lit at gcse and now am predicted an A at a level. You can get the grade as long as you are willing to put in the work.
Thank you for the response.
And yes I understand I have to read a whole lot more. The problem is I was asked to read Jane Austens Sense and Sensibility over the summer, but the text was very advanced and hard for me to understand, so now I'm worried that I won't be able to adjust to A-level English lit. Was this an issue you also had and would I gradually be able to understand and read more advanced texts like this?
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username1934763
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I just did my GCSEs and got Bs in both English lit & lang. I'm also going to do English lit for A level (also doing sociology, RS and government + politics). I know the jump is going to be big but I'm definitely aiming high, preferably for an A and for a top university. Fingers crossed though!
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a012
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A level English lit is different, there is a lot of reading, a lot of analysis and you have to remember key terminology which you will learn. There are lot of terminology which you need to remember for poems, novels and plays. Also, the essays have to be detailed and it's different to how you write essays for GCSE. You have to include certain things to just get C so to get A is hard work.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by sagelolz)
I just did my GCSEs and got Bs in both English lit & lang. I'm also going to do English lit for A level (also doing sociology, RS and government + politics). I know the jump is going to be big but I'm definitely aiming high, preferably for an A and for a top university. Fingers crossed though!
It's nice to know there are people with similar aspirations as me. Yes fingers crossed. I guess I should just take the plunge and do it.
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miraliqbal
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it depends a lot on the exam board you choose, like if you do wjec, its really easy to get an A* and also if you're doing cie you then also have a high chance of geting an A* because their grade boundaries are really low and lots of options to choose from, i havent done english literature but i am also choosing it as an A level subject (through wjec board), studied gcse language and literature through cie, i would suggest that you see the past papers and mark schemes to know more about your examination board, and moreover you have 2 your to prepare so you should not worry much , if you are interested in the subject then go for it.
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Gabriela123
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(Original post by _Hafsa)
Thank you for the response.
And yes I understand I have to read a whole lot more. The problem is I was asked to read Jane Austens Sense and Sensibility over the summer, but the text was very advanced and hard for me to understand, so now I'm worried that I won't be able to adjust to A-level English lit. Was this an issue you also had and would I gradually be able to understand and read more advanced texts like this?
At first i had to read Othello by Shakespeare and i couldn't really understand the text or how to analyse it but the more you research, re read and remember, gradually you get the hang of the texts are are able to read and understand more complex texts. It is all about studying the text constantly because those who did got A's and B's in tests while those who just read the text didnt. You learn how to read advanced texts in lessons and that helps, you'll get the hang of it eventually.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by miraliqbal)
it depends a lot on the exam board you choose, like if you do wjec, its really easy to get an A* and also if you're doing cie you then also have a high chance of geting an A* because their grade boundaries are really low and lots of options to choose from, i havent done english literature but i am also choosing it as an A level subject (through wjec board), studied gcse language and literature through cie, i would suggest that you see the past papers and mark schemes to know more about your examination board, and moreover you have 2 your to prepare so you should not worry much , if you are interested in the subject then go for it.
Ahh now that's a bummer as the school I'll be attending have chosen ocr as there exam bored for English and to add to that the course they have chosen has no past papers online.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by a012)
A level English lit is different, there is a lot of reading, a lot of analysis and you have to remember key terminology which you will learn. There are lot of terminology which you need to remember for poems, novels and plays. Also, the essays have to be detailed and it's different to how you write essays for GCSE. You have to include certain things to just get C so to get A is hard work.
So I guess I'll just have to work my arse off if I do choose it. thanks for the response.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by Gabriela123)
At first i had to read Othello by Shakespeare and i couldn't really understand the text or how to analyse it but the more you research, re read and remember, gradually you get the hang of the texts are are able to read and understand more complex texts. It is all about studying the text constantly because those who did got A's and B's in tests while those who just read the text didnt. You learn how to read advanced texts in lessons and that helps, you'll get the hang of it eventually.
Thank you, that really helped me to come to a final decision now.
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miraliqbal
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(Original post by _Hafsa)
Ahh now that's a bummer as the school I'll be attending have chosen ocr as there exam bored for English and to add to that the course they have chosen has no past papers online.
but i have heard that ocr has great resources, its books provide a lot of information, and there must be past papers and mark schemes on their website, good luck!
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by miraliqbal)
but i have heard that ocr has great resources, its books provide a lot of information, and there must be past papers and mark schemes on their website, good luck!
Oh really, I won't give up just yet then, and Thanks!
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username1229433
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(Original post by _Hafsa)
I received Bs in both English Lang&Lit. I'm aspiring to study law at either UCL, KCL or LSE and they all require A*AA at A-level. I just want to know will I be capable enough of getting at least an A at A-level English lit. Also I want to know how different is it from GCSE and pretty much anything I would need to know before I decide to pick it. My other options would be History, and Sociology. If I change my mind on English Lit, I will be picking up Government&Politics instead.
Thanks.
It is definitely possible to achieve an "A" in English Lit at A-Level.

English lit at A-Level is different to GCSE level in a sense that you go more into depth with the topics that you study meaning there is a lot of analysing, discussions, various interpretations, more books to read, respected in uni etc.

It can be quite time consuming, but if you can handle all of this, then choose English lit.

In my opinion, studying this subject will benefit you in so many ways. Especially when you are writing your assignments and doing written exams in uni. I am so glad that I studied it during my A-Level years, because it taught me how to answer questions properly and has expanded my vocabulary skills.




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itsConnor_
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Please don't be put off, I got a C at GCSE (after a disastrous poetry/Dr.Jekyll exam) and didn't really like reading but knew i liked the subject. We pretty much did all of the reading in class and in the end I got an A*. I think enjoying the texts makes it a lot easier to succeed in English lit

It's a great subject and will be so helpful for many degrees
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by itsConnor_)
Please don't be put off, I got a C at GCSE (after a disastrous poetry/Dr.Jekyll exam) and didn't really like reading but knew i liked the subject. We pretty much did all of the reading in class and in the end I got an A*. I think enjoying the texts makes it a lot easier to succeed in English lit

It's a great subject and will be so helpful for many degrees
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Thanks that helps a lot, considering I did 'Of mice and men for gcse and I didn't really enjoy it. I'm much more certain now and look forward to English this September.
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_Hafsa
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(Original post by babyshawte)
It is definitely possible to achieve an "A" in English Lit at A-Level.

English lit at A-Level is different to GCSE level in a sense that you go more into depth with the topics that you study meaning there is a lot of analysing, discussions, various interpretations, more books to read, respected in uni etc.

It can be quite time consuming, but if you can handle all of this, then choose English lit.

In my opinion, studying this subject will benefit you in so many ways. Especially when you are writing your assignments and doing written exams in uni. I am so glad that I studied it during my A-Level years, because it taught me how to answer questions properly and has expanded my vocabulary skills.

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Thanks for the useful advice, hopefully I will be able to manage my time well with only three subjects to worry about.
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TheresaIsSleepy
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Just finished my English Lit A level - gonna mirror what itsConnor said. Enjoying the texts really helps, and you'll find the material more interesting to engage with in sixth form, because the course gets broader and less of it is about spieling off about foreshadowing. There's a lot more of understanding why writers employ techniques and how critics have typically engaged with them (this is great because you can just learn a couple of quotes from specific critics and that fills the relevant AO, and from that point you make a couple of links between that with the text and you've got marks).

There is a lot more memorising, especially at AS (on the old specs I found A2 less time consuming), but you'll write essays over the year and as long as you keep them, you've got ready frames because there'll be those key quotes you can apply anywhere.

Looking at the Spec, 20% of the whole A level is coursework, which is usually a big perk of doing English (if you perfect and redraft this as much as possible before submitting it to your teachers, you guarantee yourself a nice boost towards your grade).

Good luck, and I'd definitely recommend taking it. AS was a drag but by A2, it's such a light relief from subjects like history, which just have so much content!
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Arfaa
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Hey, I also aspire to study law at UCL. For my alevels that I'm starting this year I'm doing English Lit, Politics, Biology and Chemistry. I got a B in English Lang and an A in English Lit (3 off an A*). Even though it's not amazing I absolutely love literature and I believe I can get an A. As long as you enjoy it enough to work hard in you should be fine
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