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Help me with this chemistry questions please URGENT watch

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    1. When using silver nitrate to test for the presence of chloride ions in aqueous solution,it is important to add another reagent to prevent interference by any carbonate ions which would form a white precipate of Ag2CO3.

    Identify this other reagent


    Write an equation to show how this other reagent reacts with sodium carbonate.
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    What have you tried?
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    nitric acid
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    is it NaCO3+ 2HNO3 -> Na(NO3)2 + H2O + CO2
    This is to get rid of CO2 which is shown by the effervescence?
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    (Original post by coconut64)
    is it NaCO3+ 2HNO3 -> Na(NO3)2 + H2O + CO2
    This is to get rid of CO2 which is shown by the effervescence?
    You have the formulae of sodium carbonate and sodium nitrate incorrect, but the idea is good, although the carbon dioxide is irrelevant as you are trying to get rid of the carbonate ions.
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    (Original post by England113)
    1. When using silver nitrate to test for the presence of chloride ions in aqueous solution,it is important to add another reagent to prevent interference by any carbonate ions which would form a white precipate of Ag2CO3.

    Identify this other reagent


    Write an equation to show how this other reagent reacts with sodium carbonate.
    The reagent would be nitric acid. The equation is:

    Na2CO3 + 2HNO3 ==> 2NaNO3 + H2O + CO2

    Removing the spectator ions gives you the following ionic equation:

    CO32- + 2H+ ==> H2O + CO2
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    (Original post by Jpw1097)
    The reagent would be nitric acid. The equation is:

    Na2CO3 + 2HNO3 ==> 2NaNO3 + H2O + CO2

    Removing the spectator ions gives you the following ionic equation:

    CO32- + 2H+ ==> H2O + CO2
    Doing someone's work for them isn't very helpful.
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    (Original post by charco)
    You have the formulae of sodium carbonate and sodium nitrate incorrect, but the idea is good, although the carbon dioxide is irrelevant as you are trying to get rid of the carbonate ions.
    Thanks! That's a terrible mistake.
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    Sorry as this is your post but I need help also. Here is my thread.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4285948


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    (Original post by alow)
    Doing someone's work for them isn't very helpful.
    That's for the OP to decide.
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    (Original post by Jpw1097)
    That's for the OP to decide.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post64637319

    Read this before you post any more answers.

    There's no point in giving someone an answer, it's much more helpful to everyone if you give the OP nudges in the right direction as then they can figure out things for themselves.

    The aim is to help the OP understand the question, not to show off how smart you are.
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    (Original post by Jpw1097)
    The reagent would be nitric acid. The equation is:

    Na2CO3 + 2HNO3 ==> 2NaNO3 + H2O + CO2

    Removing the spectator ions gives you the following ionic equation:

    CO32- + 2H+ ==> H2O + CO2

    Thanks it means a lot
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    (Original post by Jpw1097)
    The reagent would be nitric acid. The equation is:

    Na2CO3 + 2HNO3 ==> 2NaNO3 + H2O + CO2

    Removing the spectator ions gives you the following ionic equation:




    CO32- + 2H+ ==> H2O + CO2
    The presence of some halide ions in solution can be detected using aqueous silver nitrate and aqueous ammonia.Identify a halide ions which, on addition of aqueous silver nitrate , forms a precipitate that is insoluble in concentrated aqueous ammonia.Identify a halide ion which cannot be detected using these reagents.
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    The reagent is Nitric Acid HNO3
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    (Original post by url0velyhannah)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    The reagent is Nitric Acid HNO3
    The presence of some halide ions in solution can be detected using aqueous silver nitrate and aqueous ammonia.

    Identify a halide ions which, on addition of aqueous silver nitrate , forms a precipitate that is insoluble in concentrated aqueous ammonia.

    Identify a halide ion which cannot be detected using these reagents.
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    looking at this Chemistry lark makes me wonder how i got an A at GCSE, thank God i ain't doing it at A-level.
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    (Original post by England113)
    The presence of some halide ions in solution can be detected using aqueous silver nitrate and aqueous ammonia.

    Identify a halide ions which, on addition of aqueous silver nitrate , forms a precipitate that is insoluble in concentrated aqueous ammonia.

    Identify a halide ion which cannot be detected using these reagents.
    http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...7/testing.html

    This page should have all the information you need. Feel free to ask if you need any more help.
 
 
 
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