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Driving a petrol car after learning in diesel Watch

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    Hi all,
    As the title says, I took lessons in diesel cars and now I have bought a petrol Golf. Drove it for the first time yesterday and I stalled 3/4 times when setting off from a complete stop. Embarassing to say the least! This was never the case on diesel except when I first started my lessons. I've tried applying some gas while taking off but then the car just lurches forward. Appreciate any advice thanks!
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    Sounds like you're in too much of a hurry to get your foot off the clutch

    tbh it's just a case of getting used to it - practice on an empty carpark or something.
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    fairly common complaint for people who get their first car as most people learn in a diesel. Diesel engines produce more torque which gives them more pull from a standing start. i remember being able to do a hill start with the clutch alone in my instructors car but when i got my own car a 1.0l petrol corsa it was not the case at all. As suggested above try and go somewhere to practise moving off, also try to find somewhere with a hill and practise there too. Its just about good clutch control, you shouldnt need lots of gas to move off smoothly even in low powered small engine car. And try not to worry about stalling everyones been there at some point !
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    As the salesman said when I bought my first Petrol car - give it some gas!
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    I had the same issue get the get the rev counter up to 1500 lift the clutch up slowly and release the handbrake and you are off
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    (Original post by Tempzzz)
    Hi all,
    As the title says, I took lessons in diesel cars and now I have bought a petrol Golf. Drove it for the first time yesterday and I stalled 3/4 times when setting off from a complete stop. Embarassing to say the least! This was never the case on diesel except when I first started my lessons. I've tried applying some gas while taking off but then the car just lurches forward. Appreciate any advice thanks!
    If I was you I'd have got a diesel car. Cheaper tax and far better MPG.

    A freind of mine has a diesel Peogeot 205 1.4 HDI. It gets 50 Mpg around town and only £30 a year road tax !
    The petrol version of the same car gets a pathetic 32 Mpg and costs £200 a year road tax.

    Its a no brainer...
    • TSR Support Team
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    I was the exact same. Learned in a diesel and then once I passed I moved onto my mum's petrol. I probably stalled more than when I was a learner driver initially!
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    Ive had two driving instructors, (both with diesels) and the first taught me to move off with just the clutch..... and the second who always stresses the importance of using some gass when moving off, he says you may be able to move off with just the clutch in this car but you wont in a petrol, so now i always use the gass to (unless i forget) I have driven my dads car which is indeed a petrol and stalled a few times, yes you get used to it and didnt stall all the time. but still i dont want to be worrying about stalling when i have just passed my test and am worried about other things so for this reason im looking to get a diesel car.
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    The problem mainly occurs at busy junctions or at traffic lights, I tend to hasten the moving off process and in doing so I either forget to apply adequate gas or bring the clutch up too quick! Is it better to bring the clutch up to bite first then apply gas, or build revs first then bring clutch up?
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    (Original post by SC1991)
    fairly common complaint ... as most people learn in a diesel
    Such a shame. Once upon a time, almost all driving instructors taught in petrol cars.

    I wish they'd appreciate that they're teaching a life skill, but they try to cling on to false savings as much as they can. If only they knew that owning a diesel for short journeys and low mileage is false economy.
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    (Original post by Advisor)
    Such a shame. Once upon a time, almost all driving instructors taught in petrol cars.

    I wish they'd appreciate that they're teaching a life skill, but they try to cling on to false savings as much as they can. If only they knew that owning a diesel for short journeys and low mileage is false economy.
    My understanding was that instructors prefer diesel engine cars as they are harder to stall.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    My understanding was that instructors prefer diesel engine cars as they are harder to stall.
    That's just as bad! That's like teaching somebody to swim with armbands on because it's "harder to sink". No good to them many years later in open seas.

    Teach somebody to drive correctly in a petrol engined car, and they can drive anything. Teach somebody in a diesel because it's "harder to stall" and they're screwed once they pass a test and don't know how to control a petrol. Hardly encouragement of "safe driving for life", is it?
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    (Original post by Advisor)
    That's just as bad! That's like teaching somebody to swim with armbands on because it's "harder to sink". No good to them many years later in open seas.

    Teach somebody to drive correctly in a petrol engined car, and they can drive anything. Teach somebody in a diesel because it's "harder to stall" and they're screwed once they pass a test and don't know how to control a petrol. Hardly encouragement of "safe driving for life", is it?
    Well I see your point though it's easy to see why people prefer learning in a diesel... if you set up as a petrol pete's proper driving school with petrol cars you'd lose customers to your competitor diesel daves SOM down the road

    anyway new drivers are not really screwed or unsafe on the road - just a temporary inconvenience while they're getting used to it.
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    Driving a petrol car rather than a diesel means being much more in tune with the clutch and throttle - it requires delicacy, and that means practice and patience.

    Once you've mastered driving a petrol - and it's not difficult - you'll have a more instinctive feel for what your car is doing.
 
 
 
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