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    Hi there. I am currently writing an article about the infuriating way people assume Arts students are going to be teachers. I would like to get some opinions from people to give my article some legitimacy. Do you feel like your course is considered less 'important' than science/maths degrees? What careers are you pursuing? Any feedback would be great, thanks!
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    Even when I tell people I want to do Maths in university, I still get the occasional maths teacher remark tbh.
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    (Original post by Blaze3211)
    Even when I tell people I want to do Maths in university, I still get the occasional maths teacher remark tbh.

    That's a good point, I've never considered that!
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    (Original post by Blaze3211)
    Even when I tell people I want to do Maths in university, I still get the occasional maths teacher remark tbh.
    Yeahh samee wtf

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    I studied Classics, and my impression is that 80% of classicists go on to become either teachers, academics and lawyers, but nobody has assumed I'm going to be a teacher (especially when I get terrible stage fright and hate being the centre of attention!). I've done an internship at a publisher and that's the career path I want to go into.
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    I can and will say that English Literature, just like any other ''artsy'' subject will not make you a teacher. That's first. Even when you graduate, you still have to undertake a teacher training that's a year long or so. So the ''you're studying English? Are you gonna be a teacher'' myth is just that - a myth; a societal skewed notion about this particular area of study.

    Moving on. The main reason I've chosen English and American Literature as my degree is this: I don't want to limit my opportunities when it comes to job market, general knowledge, or even life(style). With English you can go anywhere. With Mathematics, not really. You may say it's a biased opinion, and that's fine, but I don't think it is. Think about it for a while.

    Another interesting fact about English is that you not only have the ability, support, and skills to become a teacher, but you can get yourself a good-looking TEFL diploma and teach it abroad while sipping on your ice-cold and muddy yellow Vanilla Pineapple Margarita with a pink as Peppa Pig's over-sized nose that resembles a barrel of a shotgun cocktail umbrella, and working on your own thing (or travelling) during your leisure time. On top of that you can dive in to politics, publishing, editorial offices, accountancy, law firms, investment banking corporations, etc.

    The world is your oyster.

    And if it doesn't work out, if you have wasted 3-4 years of your life, at least your English level will be sufficient enough so you can go to Vegas and start counting cards for a living.
 
 
 
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