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    PS. I didn't do IT at alevels but I've always thought about computing
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    It will be a lot more theory and maths than you'll see on CSI.
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    It will be pretty hard if you didn't do IT or Computer Science at a levels, but i'm guessing you did for GCSEs?
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    It will be a lot more theory and maths than you'll see on CSI.
    I wouldn't say there would be much maths..

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I wouldn't say there would be much maths..
    Databases and data analysis would be pretty mathematical. The point being to the OP that it isn't all as glamorous as Hollywood makes out, and they need to be aware of the amount of theory involved when they ask the question "is forensic computing a good degree?".
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    Yeah I finished my ICT GCSE with an A carrying on to a level. Database coursework required a lot of maths and barely an IT skills. Some IT obviously but you definitely need to have a good understanding.

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    Graduated from one of the early FC degrees a few years ago. I would really recommend it, but with caveats!

    What others have said regarding maths etc - it's not too bad. I struggled with maths a lot at school, but was heavily into IT and computing in general. I think that's what saved me in the degree. Two or three modules over the course of the three years required a level of applied maths which I initially struggled with but I found did come more easily the more I did it. Examples for me were courses which taught you basic logic and problem solving - this is crucial for this degree and although it sounds scary, it is really simple stuff. It's easy to learn and easy to understand, but if you haven't before though about the world around you in that way it can seem downright scary.

    From people who I was with on my course who had no previous IT experience (either at GCSE, A Level or otherwise), they did unfortunately really struggle. Even those who were strong mathematically did find some modules very hard. Some of the concepts in the 2nd and 3rd years are just foreign and alien to folks who haven't really used a computer in anger before. FC is not an easy course - it gives an in-depth view of Computer Science and then applies the theory there to real world scenarios. It is a good course - if you are confident with a computer (to such a level that reinstalling Windows, installing new hardware inside the case etc) then it will be a good few years for you - but if you have not previously had much exposure to more advanced functions of a computer then FC may be a bit too much too quickly..
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    I'm doing computer science with security and forensics. You should think about that. It keeps your options more open, with just forensics computing it limits you to just that type of a job. With a degree like mine I'm qualified for any type of job (graduate level) in computer science industry but it also means I've covered what is needed for security and forensics too
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    (Original post by Devify)
    I'm doing computer science with security and forensics. You should think about that. It keeps your options more open, with just forensics computing it limits you to just that type of a job. With a degree like mine I'm qualified for any type of job (graduate level) in computer science industry but it also means I've covered what is needed for security and forensics too
    Many jobs specify a requirement for a "Computer Science related degree". FC does fall into that, so it would act as a prerequisite for any job in the IT industry just as much as Computer Science. I find it hard to believe that no employer is only going to want Computer Science graduates, that would limit their intake and skill pool hugely - you wouldn't get any diversity from other degrees.

    But, it is something to check and make sure for anything other than FC. The only reason I know is that I did FC and I have worked at several places, all of them IT but none of them Forensic-related, and I've been absolutely fine all the way to my first day.
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    (Original post by Devify)
    I'm doing computer science with security and forensics. You should think about that. It keeps your options more open, with just forensics computing it limits you to just that type of a job. With a degree like mine I'm qualified for any type of job (graduate level) in computer science industry but it also means I've covered what is needed for security and forensics too
    What uni?
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    (Original post by SpiffyTheSeal)
    Graduated from one of the early FC degrees a few years ago. I would really recommend it, but with caveats!

    What others have said regarding maths etc - it's not too bad. I struggled with maths a lot at school, but was heavily into IT and computing in general. I think that's what saved me in the degree. Two or three modules over the course of the three years required a level of applied maths which I initially struggled with but I found did come more easily the more I did it. Examples for me were courses which taught you basic logic and problem solving - this is crucial for this degree and although it sounds scary, it is really simple stuff. It's easy to learn and easy to understand, but if you haven't before though about the world around you in that way it can seem downright scary.

    From people who I was with on my course who had no previous IT experience (either at GCSE, A Level or otherwise), they did unfortunately really struggle. Even those who were strong mathematically did find some modules very hard. Some of the concepts in the 2nd and 3rd years are just foreign and alien to folks who haven't really used a computer in anger before. FC is not an easy course - it gives an in-depth view of Computer Science and then applies the theory there to real world scenarios. It is a good course - if you are confident with a computer (to such a level that reinstalling Windows, installing new hardware inside the case etc) then it will be a good few years for you - but if you have not previously had much exposure to more advanced functions of a computer then FC may be a bit too much too quickly..
    Hey, I've been looking at this degree but struggling to decide, I'm taking A-Level CS and took for GCSE; but I'm mostly concerned about career choices after the degree... How are you finding it?
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    (Original post by HarrisonBaillie)
    Hey, I've been looking at this degree but struggling to decide, I'm taking A-Level CS and took for GCSE; but I'm mostly concerned about career choices after the degree... How are you finding it?
    If you're worried about career choices just do computer science with forensic computing or with security and forensics etc. You get the general computer science degree which allows you to work with anything computer related easier. But you still get the forensics specialisation. And if you find a different specialisation you prefer, you won't be stuck with forensics.

    Then again, most places will allow a computer science related degree and would most likely be fine with forensic computing even for unrelated computer fields although they tend to have preferences.
 
 
 
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