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    My school allows you to do only 3 A levels, however you can do 4 if you have the minimum grades of 4A*s and 4As, which I got.

    One of the teachers recommended I should do an EPQ because they said I was strong academically. He also said it's something universities like to see.

    My main concern is that if I do an EPQ, the rest of my 3 grades will suffer because I won't spend as much time revising for the main three A levels, which are maths, biology and chemistry. I want to study either medicine, dentistry, chemistry or pharmacy at university.

    My first question is, do universities really value EPQs?

    Secondly, is it worth taking an EPQ even if it's worth half an A-level, despite my other grades possibly suffering? Which is more important: three amazing grades, or three mediocre grades plus an EPQ-which gives more UCAS points?

    If you could reply to this asap that would be great because I need to let my teacher know what I'm going to take. Thank you very much!
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    Hello there, university do really value EPQ, but it will affect your A-level grade
    significantly, as it is very tough, and sorry for being harsh but i will rather be honest to you. So i would advice you to think would you be able to cope will all the work load, as you do the hardest A-level there are. So yeah hope i was helpfull
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    Hullo,

    I did Maths, Bio, Chem and History at AS (wanting to do Medicine) and did an EPQ on top. (I got AAAA and I don't know what I got in EPQ yet)
    Obviously your A-Level grades are much more important than whether or not you have an EPQ, but to be honest I really didn't find it took up that much of my time. You need to pick a topic that doesn't require a ridiculous amount of research (I would suggest medical ethics) but if you have to do a mega-scientific one then make sure you already know quite a lot about it already. But a lot of people I know did a really science-y one and found they couldn't access much of the material about it because it was too high-level, and their analysis suffered as a result.

    But anyway - I basically did a bit of research every week for about 6 or 7 months from September, and then around February I started writing it. I did the bulk of the writing in a couple of half-day sessions, and since I was so interested in my topic I found it was quite a nice break from revision.

    If you're not very good at essays it might not be a good idea, or if you're the sort of person that leaves things till the last minute, because those sorts of people in my year ended up finding it really stressful. But I gained a lot from doing mine, so I'd recommend it personally
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    An EPQ gives you something to write about in your personal statement, which would be an advantage of taking it. However if you don't do an EPQ, there would be less to write about. Would top universities take someone who has a good personal statement (which includes an EPQ) over someone with better grades?
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    (Original post by Zedna)
    Hullo,

    I did Maths, Bio, Chem and History at AS (wanting to do Medicine) and did an EPQ on top. (I got AAAA and I don't know what I got in EPQ yet)
    Obviously your A-Level grades are much more important than whether or not you have an EPQ, but to be honest I really didn't find it took up that much of my time. You need to pick a topic that doesn't require a ridiculous amount of research (I would suggest medical ethics) but if you have to do a mega-scientific one then make sure you already know quite a lot about it already. But a lot of people I know did a really science-y one and found they couldn't access much of the material about it because it was too high-level, and their analysis suffered as a result.

    But anyway - I basically did a bit of research every week for about 6 or 7 months from September, and then around February I started writing it. I did the bulk of the writing in a couple of half-day sessions, and since I was so interested in my topic I found it was quite a nice break from revision.

    If you're not very good at essays it might not be a good idea, or if you're the sort of person that leaves things till the last minute, because those sorts of people in my year ended up finding it really stressful. But I gained a lot from doing mine, so I'd recommend it personally
    Hey there,
    Thanks for your reply.

    I'm somebody who needs to work very hard and very long to achieve good grades. At A Levels, I'm aiming for at least A*A*A. I worry that if I do take an EPQ (like you recommended), I will not be able to put as much work into my other prioritised subjects.

    Have you mentioned your EPQ in your personal statement? If so, how much of the personal statement dd it take up?
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    (Original post by Ariyan khan)
    Hello there, university do really value EPQ, but it will affect your A-level grade
    significantly, as it is very tough, and sorry for being harsh but i will rather be honest to you. So i would advice you to think would you be able to cope will all the work load, as you do the hardest A-level there are. So yeah hope i was helpfull
    Hello,
    Thanks for the reply.

    Do the top unis prioritise high grades over high UCAS points? If I don't do an EPQ, I feel as tough my grades will be high enough for an offer.
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    If you're doing non-essay subjects and applying for medicine I would definitely reccomend it. I got asked about my EPQ in half of my interviews and mentioned it in my personal statement. It gives you something to talk about and you can chooses whatever topic you'd like so can become an expert in a small part of your desired subject. It's a good way to see if you definitely want to spend the next 3-6 years doing that subject. You can definitely achieve the grades you want if you manage your time effectively. Get it written and all sorted out by February and you'll have loads of time to study. I ended up getting A*A*A* and dropped one mark in my EPQ so it is possible don't worry.
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    (Original post by Nadia.barakat)
    If you're doing non-essay subjects and applying for medicine I would definitely reccomend it. I got asked about my EPQ in half of my interviews and mentioned it in my personal statement. It gives you something to talk about and you can chooses whatever topic you'd like so can become an expert in a small part of your desired subject. It's a good way to see if you definitely want to spend the next 3-6 years doing that subject. You can definitely achieve the grades you want if you manage your time effectively. Get it written and all sorted out by February and you'll have loads of time to study. I ended up getting A*A*A* and dropped one mark in my EPQ so it is possible don't worry.
    What did you take at A Levels? Also, what university are you hoping to study medicine at?
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    (Original post by Student150)
    Hey there,
    Thanks for your reply.

    I'm somebody who needs to work very hard and very long to achieve good grades. At A Levels, I'm aiming for at least A*A*A. I worry that if I do take an EPQ (like you recommended), I will not be able to put as much work into my other prioritised subjects.

    Have you mentioned your EPQ in your personal statement? If so, how much of the personal statement dd it take up?
    That's fair - it's hard to know until you start really. Everyone seems to deal with A-Levels in different ways. You could always start it and drop it if it seems too much?

    I'm going to be mentioning it, though not in huge detail because I've done a hell of a lot of volunteering which is going to be the bulk of it - it would probably take up more if I was doing a less vocational subject. But I think if I get interviews it will be a good thing to talk about.
 
 
 
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