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    Has anyone applied for this course and gotten in? Or has anyone generally any idea of how hard it is? I've seen in the statistics that the chances of getting in are much smaller than for normal law, but I want to know whether it's for reasons such as lack of fluency in the language, and whether native speakers have more of a chance. What has your experience been, if you've applied? And what extra things are the admission officers looking for there? Thanks a lot! x
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    I'm planning on applying for Law with German Law, regarding statistics; that depends on your course. According to "http://university.which.co.uk", which I believe to be quite reputable, it is easier to receive an offer for 'Law with German Law' (37% chance) than for straight 'Law' (16%). That being said, your odds are low with 'Law with Spanish Law', mainly due to the fact that they only accept 2 students into that course each year (yes, just two), however, the percentage of applicants receiving an interview for 'Law with Spanish Law' is (17%, one % more than straight Law). Though if I were you I wouldn't worry about the statistics and would take them with a generous pinch of salt.

    I could only assume that oxford would prefer candidates with fluency in the language, only because they seek for 'safe bets', and being fluent in the language would demonstrate that there is a low chance of you failing, or dropping gout due to the pressure of the extra language.
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    (Original post by metalTree007)
    Has anyone applied for this course and gotten in? Or has anyone generally any idea of how hard it is? I've seen in the statistics that the chances of getting in are much smaller than for normal law, but I want to know whether it's for reasons such as lack of fluency in the language, and whether native speakers have more of a chance. What has your experience been, if you've applied? And what extra things are the admission officers looking for there? Thanks a lot! x
    Two of my friends studied Law with German Law, neither were native speakers. But I couldn't comment on what the preference of tutors would be. Regarding stats: I could be wrong so please check with admissions, but I think I remember my friend saying that those who applied for Law with Law in Europe were also considered for normal Law if they were unsuccessful in the former. But I stress to double check that. It is possible to transfer to the former after you have started studying Law but it is highly competitive and not especially common from what I heard.
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    I know it's rather upfront to ask; but I don't suppose either of them would be willing to chat with me, regarding the interview process (if I get an interview that is)? @brendan
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    (Original post by AndreasCooke)
    I know it's rather upfront to ask; but I don't suppose either of them would be willing to chat with me, regarding the interview process (if I get an interview that is)? @brendan
    I could ask them. Neither are on here but might be willing to help out (if they're not busy lawyering haha).
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    (Original post by AndreasCooke)
    I'm planning on applying for Law with German Law, regarding statistics; that depends on your course. According to "http://university.which.co.uk", which I believe to be quite reputable, it is easier to receive an offer for 'Law with German Law' (37% chance) than for straight 'Law' (16%). That being said, your odds are low with 'Law with Spanish Law', mainly due to the fact that they only accept 2 students into that course each year (yes, just two), however, the percentage of applicants receiving an interview for 'Law with Spanish Law' is (17%, one % more than straight Law). Though if I were you I wouldn't worry about the statistics and would take them with a generous pinch of salt.

    I could only assume that oxford would prefer candidates with fluency in the language, only because they seek for 'safe bets', and being fluent in the language would demonstrate that there is a low chance of you failing, or dropping gout due to the pressure of the extra language.

    Law with Law Studies in Europe is competitive because places in European Universities are limited on the programme. Candidates applying for LSE are also cosnidered for straight Law (Jurisprundence) though.

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