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    Hi guys, I've actually just graduated this year (woop!) but I have a question about my partner.*

    Basically he started uni before the tuition fee rise in 2012, to £9,000, and since then has only had to pay his usual £3000 a year. The issue is, he's going into third year now (due to Erasmus and moving uni), and all of a sudden he was told by student finance yesterday that his tuition fees are now £9000 for this year. However he isn't getting a loan of any kind due to him having his 4 years worth already (as its a three year course).*

    My questions are:*
    1. Can they do this? It was my understanding that the government said they would not raise the tuition for any students under the old fees, regardless of how long they are on their course. If this was said, can anyone find the official document that says it because I can't find it anywhere!*

    2. Surely the university should have informed him? A fair time ago too, as now he's stuck with a contract on a house he potentially won't be able to live in because he may have to drop out of uni (due to counsil tax issues).

    3. What can he do to try and fund the course, ie are there any forms of support that anyone knows of or has used?

    It's just such a shame because he loves his course and no one mentioned anything last year about this rise, which to mean is ridiculously unfair as if he had known he wouldve stopped a long time ago!

    Thanks guys ☺️*
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    (Original post by Pendulum2)
    Basically he started uni before the tuition fee rise in 2012, to £9,000, and since then has only had to pay his usual £3000 a year. The issue is, he's going into third year now (due to Erasmus and moving uni), and all of a sudden he was told by student finance yesterday that his tuition fees are now £9000 for this year. However he isn't getting a loan of any kind due to him having his 4 years worth already (as its a three year course).

    My questions are:
    1. Can they do this? It was my understanding that the government said they would not raise the tuition for any students under the old fees, regardless of how long they are on their course. If this was said, can anyone find the official document that says it because I can't find it anywhere!
    The new uni is treating him as a new student rather than a continuing one. Given the extended amount of time he's taking to complete + new uni + different course + potential gap between current and previous uni study, this sounds correct. He needs to ask his new uni to confirm whether they view him as a new or continuing student. If they class him as a new student, then the £9000 fees will be correct. It's essentially up to the uni and yes, they can do this.

    2. Surely the university should have informed him?
    Possibly, but it's not clear-cut. There's an argument that he should have realised that taking 5+ years to complete a 3 year degree, including swapping uni/course, might make his situation less than standard. He made an assumption which was unfortunately wrong. Likewise, the uni assumed that he understood the implications of what he was planning. It isn't really their resonsibility to inform him, although wih hindsight, flagging it would have been useful. Who should have done what is a pointless debate at this stage.

    A fair time ago too, as now he's stuck with a contract on a house he potentially won't be able to live in because he may have to drop out of uni (due to counsil tax issues).
    If he's dropping out due to an unrelated housing/Council Tax problem anyway, then the tuition fee hike is moot. Or is this issue somehow related?

    3. What can he do to try and fund the course, ie are there any forms of support that anyone knows of or has used?
    Nothing easy or cheap I'm afraid. There is a private lender for undergrads but their interest rates, terms and conditions are very much commercial and he would be tied into a repayment scheme for years, which would take no account of whether he could afford to repay.

    It's just such a shame because he loves his course and no one mentioned anything last year about this rise, which to mean is ridiculously unfair as if he had known he wouldve stopped a long time ago!
    Having already taken four years of study for a thee year course, his Student Finance would always have run out his year and left him self-funding, regardless of how much his tuiton fees are.

    Were there unavoidable cirumstances which have caused his extended study? Student Finance have a Compelling Personal Reasons process, through which he could potentially claw back years of SF funding entitlement. He would have had to be affected by something beyond his control such as health problems, bereavement etc., which caused a resit/retake/failure. He would need to produce proof of this in the form of a GP/consultant/counsellor letter etc.
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    (Original post by Pendulum2)
    as now he's stuck with a contract on a house he potentially won't be able to live in because he may have to drop out of uni (due to counsil tax issues).
    This makes no sense at all. If he was a full time student he wouldn't have to pay council tax.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    This makes no sense at all. If he was a full time student he wouldn't have to pay council tax.
    If he's going to be living with someone who isn't a student, then there will be a Council Tax liability for the property. We don't understand that situation at the mo.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    If he's going to be living with someone who isn't a student, then there will be a Council Tax liability for the property. We don't understand that situation at the mo.
    But not for him, and so not his problem.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    But not for him, and so not his problem.
    If only life with a partner was that simple!

    But anyway, it may not be the issue in this case. We don't know.
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    Sorry guys I should say he changed uni after first year, so he's actually been at this uni for his first 2 years, however the change of fees in only now affecting him, he isn't changing uni now. So essentially the first two years has been done at this uni at the £3000, hence why I'm somewhat confused why it's gone up now??

    The reason he would be dropping out is because he could somewhat self fund £3000 for tuition but £9000 is too much for him, and there isn't any reasonable way he could afford it, therefore meaning the contract he entered with the house is no longer necessary, and as he wont be a student he couldn't live there if he wanted to anyway..

    * And I won't be living with him, it just seems a bit unfair that he wasn't told and has entered into a contract with a landlord in August so essentially he's already paid a months rent and it is a private landlord as is often the case after the first year or second years of uni

    To me it seems a bit unfair that due to doing Erasmus where he travelled to Cyprus (which didn't count towards a year of his degree) he's ended up having to pay this when at the time he wasn't told doing so would entail a hike of tuition fees at the end, even though he has, as I said now been at this uni for three years, so from my understands regardless it should still be £3000 if that's what he has been charged for those three previous years...*
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    (Original post by Pendulum2)
    Sorry guys I should say he changed uni after first year, so he's actually been at this uni for his first 2 years, however the change of fees in only now affecting him, he isn't changing uni now. So essentially the first two years has been done at this uni at the £3000, hence why I'm somewhat confused why it's gone up now??
    In that case, I think he should contact the uni and get them to explain why they are treating him as a new student, when he is a continuing student. It's a decision which they have made which doesn't appear to be logical based on your above info. I don't think there 's much more that we can add as none of us understand the uni's rationale. You never know - if he queries it, they might just find it's something as simple as an admin error.
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    The continuing student / new student point is a red-herring. If the contract he has with them means they can change the fees each year then that is why they have done it.
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    Hmm, does anyone know where to find the policy that was passed originally, I imagine if it isn't stated that students already studying at the time are fully covered throughout the duration of the course, then the unis will only be obliged to stick to lower fees on a moral basis rather than a legal one. And given most unis have 0 morals and are perfectly happy to bankrupt an entire generation, I'll assume that is the case. I'll have a read over his contract etc though that I assume must be available somewhere too. Thanks guys!
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    (Original post by Pendulum2)
    Hmm, does anyone know where to find the policy that was passed originally, I imagine if it isn't stated that students already studying at the time are fully covered throughout the duration of the course, then the unis will only be obliged to stick to lower fees on a moral basis rather than a legal one. And given most unis have 0 morals and are perfectly happy to bankrupt an entire generation, I'll assume that is the case. I'll have a read over his contract etc though that I assume must be available somewhere too. Thanks guys!
    Google about the increase - you'll find loads about it being capable of being applied to continuing students
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    (Original post by Pendulum2)
    Hmm, does anyone know where to find the policy that was passed originally, I imagine if it isn't stated that students already studying at the time are fully covered throughout the duration of the course, then the unis will only be obliged to stick to lower fees on a moral basis rather than a legal one. And given most unis have 0 morals and are perfectly happy to bankrupt an entire generation, I'll assume that is the case. I'll have a read over his contract etc though that I assume must be available somewhere too. Thanks guys!
    I was studying with the OU at the time, and they were very clear there was a time limit for continuing on transitional fee arrangements. I would assume that other unis would have similar deadlines as they won't want students on the old fees indefinitely.
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    Excellent post by Klix.

    OP go and get advice from the SU as they need to review the documents or rules conerning transitional students. It could well be all correct and you just havent read the rules.

    In any even look into appealing.

    The CT issue is moot anyway as you should be exempt, so without further info its impossible to say although it sounds odd.
 
 
 
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