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    It seems to me that any degree like History, English, even Law from lower ranked universities is very under-valued by employers.

    Basically, any essay based subject that doesn't have a significant quantitative element seems to be regarded as a soft degree by most employers and as a consequence not regarded as proof of the degree holder's ability to actually do anything of any value.

    I think most employers look down on Arts degrees because they want people with a proven technical aptitude and ability to deal with quantitative data, and the majority of Arts subjects simply don't teach those skills.

    If anything I think it's reached the point where many employers actually sneer at Arts degrees and have a tendency to dismiss Arts graduates as lacking in practical skills, lacking in Maths skills and essentially being of no value to a business.

    The ability to write articulately doesn't really seem to be regarded as much of a skill by most employers. Employers want hard skills, people who can crunch the numbers and understand technical issues, not people who can write nicely.
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    (Original post by TobaccoSmoke)
    It seems to me that any degree like History, English, even Law from lower ranked universities is very under-valued by employers.

    Basically, any essay based subject that doesn't have a significant quantitative element seems to be regarded as a soft degree by most employers and as a consequence not regarded as proof of the degree holder's ability to actually do anything of any value.

    I think most employers look down on Arts degrees because they want people with a proven technical aptitude and ability to deal with quantitative data, and the majority of Arts subjects simply don't teach those skills.

    If anything I think it's reached the point where many employers actually sneer at Arts degrees and have a tendency to dismiss Arts graduates as lacking in practical skills, lacking in Maths skills and essentially being of no value to a business.

    The ability to write articulately doesn't really seem to be regarded as much of a skill by most employers. Employers want hard skills, people who can crunch the numbers and understand technical issues, not people who can write nicely.
    From what I've read about the way employers view graduates, its not just arts graduates that employers find are often lacking in desirable skills. Science students aren't always taught the methods that employers in industry are using.
    Whatever degree you do now days, unless it includes a placement or placements as part of the course then on its own its not helpful. It needs to be part of a package which includes work experience and a strong application. It is possible for arts graduates offering the complete package to get a good job, just as a science student won't walk into a job without the complete package either. And unfortunately a degree isn't always evidence that people can write nicely.
 
 
 
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