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    I've just finished doing my Alevels and I am off to Uni in September but with grades that were lower than I wanted (I wanted ABB and got BCC). I was wondering how you all revised? Maybe I missed something?
    Would be most helpful for AQA Eng Lit, OCR French and/ or Edexcel History as these were the ones I took
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    Well, I didn't do any of your subjects (AQA English Language and Psycholgy, and Edexcel Biology) but personally, notes did nothing for me. Well, not much. I revised visually, I drew out all my notes with diagrams, comics, coloured mindmaps of the theories. For example, I stuck up cards with the names of psychologists and English theorists around my mirror and out of boredom used to pick one at random when brushing my hair and try to recite the dates and details by heart, things like that. And watched hours of youtube revision videos. Stuff like that.
    I guess my revision all based off using visual cues to trigger a load of knowledge. My psychology teacher wanted us to revise with notes and writing out paragraphs and I was getting U's until I stopped doing his notes and started with mine.
    Oh, and past paper practise. Hours of it. It really helped.
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    For history I read some books beyond those we were given and got my teacher to mark past paper essays. (I didn't do Edexcel but i doubt it makes much difference.)

    The people I know who did French just spoke French all the time. They read French books, they watched French TV, they listened to French music, they set their devices to be in French and generally tried to make everything French.

    I've no idea what English Lit entails.

    Oh, and for any coursework subjects. Its not revision but I got like 94% in my history coursework and anyone could no matter how good they actually were. You have basically unlimited time and your teacher (at least, mine could) can review it and tell you what needs doing etc. If you do well in the coursework it takes a whole lot of pressure off the exam.
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    (Original post by Mia549)
    Well, I didn't do any of your subjects (AQA English Lit and Psycholgy, and Edescel Biology) but personally, notes did nothing for me. Well, not much. I revised visually, I drew out all my notes with diagrams, comics, coloured mindmaps of the theories. For example, I stuck up cards with the names of psychologists and English theorists around my mirror and out of boredom used to pick one at random when brushing my hair and try to recite the dates and details by heart, things like that. And watched hours of youtube revision videos. Stuff like that.
    I guess my revision all based off using visual cues to trigger a load of knowledge. My psychology teacher wanted us to revise with notes and writing out paragraphs and I was getting U's until I stopped doing his notes and started with mine.
    Oh, and past paper practise. Hours of it. It really helped.
    I did AQA English Lit too and I was only 9 UMS off an A! But still, it wasn't the grade that I wanted. I like the idea that you revised in the way that suited you- it seems such an obvious answer but perhaps one that I rejected for too long? I definitely always did what the teachers wanted before then doing it how I wanted but maybe I should have primarily studied in the way that I knew would benefit me most.
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    (Original post by LucyON1998)
    I've just finished doing my Alevels and I am off to Uni in September but with grades that were lower than I wanted (I wanted ABB and got BCC). I was wondering how you all revised? Maybe I missed something?
    Would be most helpful for AQA Eng Lit, OCR French and/ or Edexcel History as these were the ones I took
    You can apply these principles to all subjects. Basically, you want to master the A-level. You want to thoroughly understand the system, the exam boards, the people marking your papers, the specification.

    I examined, practiced and analysed every single past paper, every single mark scheme, and every single report for the subject. I got feedback from the teachers too. I went to see them for help whenever I couldn't do it myself even after I tried and researched. I participated in class to the fullest.

    I didn't stop there. I did all the resources that were given to me - one of the largest - the internet. There's many different sites. I went through all of the "examsolution" maths videos. I went through other maths sites such as mymaths. I went through Kerboodle and all of its resources. I did not only examine the textbook that was given to me, but other textbooks if i could find them. I also got revision guides for each subject and went through them. I went on many different sites with powerpoints and obtained school powerpoints.

    As for techniques, it's vital you understand that studying needs to be balanced with your life. Therefore, incorporate many, many stuff. But empirically, it's necessary to have good sleep, good diet, all of this basic stuff should be taken care of - well it should be basic but it's the most important. Anyway, then incorporate study techniques such as spaced repetion, associations, learning techniques, studying at similar times each day, having breaks. Then comes in the more specific stuff like flash cards, mind maps, powerpoints, videos, notes, post-its, making creative stuff like leaflets, explaining it to someone else... the list goes on and on.

    Basically you want to master the skill of studying and what the exam is all about. Why did you even go to school? Do you actually know how the UMS system works? Do you know about post-exam options such as remarks?

    The key question is: Are you aware of all this stuff and are you acting on it? My greatest weakness is probably self-control and I couldn't master the basic stuff such as cutting down on sweets. But I will now. But if your problem is self-control, do not, i repeat, do not just say "I will do this, I will do that" - don't even say that - just do it instead. Don't even think. That could help. Sometimes I think so much I lose it.

    Anyway, that's what I did...in the future.
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    (Original post by Marked Target)
    For history I read some books beyond those we were given and got my teacher to mark past paper essays. (I didn't do Edexcel but i doubt it makes much difference.)

    The people I know who did French just spoke French all the time. They read French books, they watched French TV, they listened to French music, they set their devices to be in French and generally tried to make everything French.

    I've no idea what English Lit entails.

    Oh, and for any coursework subjects. Its not revision but I got like 94% in my history coursework and anyone could no matter how good they actually were. You have basically unlimited time and your teacher (at least, mine could) can review it and tell you what needs doing etc. If you do well in the coursework it takes a whole lot of pressure off the exam.
    The thing that I struggled most with in History was the mass amount of knowledge that you were expected to know. How did you learn all of the facts? The French part makes sense;perhaps I should have immersed myself more in the subject/language.
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    (Original post by Kiritsugu)
    You can apply these principles to all subjects. Basically, you want to master the A-level. You want to thoroughly understand the system, the exam boards, the people marking your papers, the specification.

    I examined, practiced and analysed every single past paper, every single mark scheme, and every single report for the subject. I got feedback from the teachers too. I went to see them for help whenever I couldn't do it myself even after I tried and researched. I participated in class to the fullest.

    I didn't stop there. I did all the resources that were given to me - one of the largest - the internet. There's many different sites. I went through all of the "examsolution" maths videos. I went through other maths sites such as mymaths. I went through Kerboodle and all of its resources. I did not only examine the textbook that was given to me, but other textbooks if i could find them. I also got revision guides for each subject and went through them. I went on many different sites with powerpoints and obtained school powerpoints.

    As for techniques, it's vital you understand that studying needs to be balanced with your life. Therefore, incorporate many, many stuff. But empirically, it's necessary to have good sleep, good diet, all of this basic stuff should be taken care of - well it should be basic but it's the most important. Anyway, then incorporate study techniques such as spaced repetion, associations, learning techniques, studying at similar times each day, having breaks. Then comes in the more specific stuff like flash cards, mind maps, powerpoints, videos, notes, post-its, making creative stuff like leaflets, explaining it to someone else... the list goes on and on.

    Basically you want to master the skill of studying and what the exam is all about. Why did you even go to school? Do you actually know how the UMS system works? Do you know about post-exam options such as remarks?

    The key question is: Are you aware of all this stuff and are you acting on it? My greatest weakness is probably self-control and I couldn't master the basic stuff such as cutting down on sweets. But I will now. But if your problem is self-control, do not, i repeat, do not just say "I will do this, I will do that" - don't even say that - just do it instead. Don't even think. That could help. Sometimes I think so much I lose it.

    Anyway, that's what I did...in the future.
    This was so helpful, thank you very much!!
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    (Original post by LucyON1998)
    This was so helpful, thank you very much!!
    You're welcome. The funny thing is that I'm so excited to prove the teachers and everyone who thought I couldn't do well, wrong. But that's just a little of my excitement. What I really want, is to do well in the exams and overall have fun in class as I want to leave my options open and I don't want any backlash. So I'm going to do all of what I said, and also, the most important thing is a routine and all the other basic stuff such as sleep, diet, exercise, learning - that's right, the word study has been thrown out of my book and I have switched that to LEARNING - and that should be integrated into your life. That, I believe, is the key.
 
 
 
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