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    Hi,

    As the title states, I was just wondering what becoming a chartered engineer really entails and what benefits it offers (particularly for chemical engineers).

    On average, how long does becoming chartered take and what does it depend on? Are there exams to study for? Is it necessary to change between different job sectors to gain a variety of experience? Do you gain anything other than a higher salary/the title of 'chartered engineer'? etc.

    It would be great to hear of any specific experiences from chartered engineers/engineers working towards chartership as well!

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Bioluminescence1)
    Hi,

    As the title states, I was just wondering what becoming a chartered engineer really entails and what benefits it offers (particularly for chemical engineers).

    On average, how long does becoming chartered take and what does it depend on? Are there exams to study for? Is it necessary to change between different job sectors to gain a variety of experience? Do you gain anything other than a higher salary/the title of 'chartered engineer'? etc.

    It would be great to hear of any specific experiences from chartered engineers/engineers working towards chartership as well!

    Thanks!
    This link should help you out:

    http://www.engc.org.uk/engcdocuments...ng%20eBook.pdf

    You may or may not get paid more. You may or may not have more opportunities open to you. It depends on the employer and sector (some sectors seem to appreciate professional registration more than others, generally).

    You don't need to move between sectors but you do need to gain enough experience in the requisite competencies, which may require you to move roles or even employers if your current role is not providing you with enough experience.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    This link should help you out:

    http://www.engc.org.uk/engcdocuments...ng%20eBook.pdf

    You may or may not get paid more. You may or may not have more opportunities open to you. It depends on the employer and sector (some sectors seem to appreciate professional registration more than others, generally).

    You don't need to move between sectors but you do need to gain enough experience in the requisite competencies, which may require you to move roles or even employers if your current role is not providing you with enough experience.
    Thanks for the link!
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    (Original post by Bioluminescence1)
    Thanks for the link!
    It's also worth pointing out that some companies have graduate schemes that are accredited by the respective institute, such that on completion you should be ready for chartership. This usually takes approximately four years, and is probably the quickest way to achieve it.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    It's also worth pointing out that some companies have graduate schemes that are accredited by the respective institute, such that on completion you should be ready for chartership. This usually takes approximately four years, and is probably the quickest way to achieve it.

    Thanks for your input!

    Are you a chartered engineer yourself? Would you say the 'additional work' to get chartered was worth your time?

    I ask because I think the sector I end up in will just depend on what graduate job I can find. I've also noticed that many companies in certain sectors have graduate schemes that aren't accredited by a professional body. So if I couldn't immediately secure a job within my desired sector then later move to a company in a different sector that was accredited, the 2/3 years of experience would essentially be irrelevant as far as chartership is concerned?

    Of course I don't plan on being unable to find my perfect graduate job, but seeing how competitive it is out there has made me question my chances.
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    (Original post by Bioluminescence1)
    Thanks for your input!

    Are you a chartered engineer yourself? Would you say the 'additional work' to get chartered was worth your time?

    I ask because I think the sector I end up in will just depend on what graduate job I can find. I've also noticed that many companies in certain sectors have graduate schemes that aren't accredited by a professional body. So if I couldn't immediately secure a job within my desired sector then later move to a company in a different sector that was accredited, the 2/3 years of experience would essentially be irrelevant as far as chartership is concerned?

    Of course I don't plan on being unable to find my perfect graduate job, but seeing how competitive it is out there has made me question my chances.
    I'm not a chartered engineer.

    Your experience does not need to be with an accredited company. As long as it is of the right level, and enough to meet the required competencies, you can go for chartership. It's mainly the very largest companies that offer accredited training schemes.

    Since you mentioned chemical engineering, here are the ones accredited by the IChemE:

    http://www.icheme.org/careers/acts/acts_companies.aspx

    But you don't need to have ever worked at any of the above organisations to get chartered.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I'm not a chartered engineer.

    Your experience does not need to be with an accredited company. As long as it is of the right level, and enough to meet the required competencies, you can go for chartership. It's mainly the very largest companies that offer accredited training schemes.

    Since you mentioned chemical engineering, here are the ones accredited by the IChemE:

    http://www.icheme.org/careers/acts/acts_companies.aspx

    But you don't need to have ever worked at any of the above organisations to get chartered.
    Oh right, I completely had the wrong idea! Thanks for clarifying
 
 
 
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