Bioluminescence1
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Hi,

As the title states, I was just wondering what becoming a chartered engineer really entails and what benefits it offers (particularly for chemical engineers).

On average, how long does becoming chartered take and what does it depend on? Are there exams to study for? Is it necessary to change between different job sectors to gain a variety of experience? Do you gain anything other than a higher salary/the title of 'chartered engineer'? etc.

It would be great to hear of any specific experiences from chartered engineers/engineers working towards chartership as well!

Thanks!
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Smack
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(Original post by Bioluminescence1)
Hi,

As the title states, I was just wondering what becoming a chartered engineer really entails and what benefits it offers (particularly for chemical engineers).

On average, how long does becoming chartered take and what does it depend on? Are there exams to study for? Is it necessary to change between different job sectors to gain a variety of experience? Do you gain anything other than a higher salary/the title of 'chartered engineer'? etc.

It would be great to hear of any specific experiences from chartered engineers/engineers working towards chartership as well!

Thanks!
This link should help you out:

http://www.engc.org.uk/engcdocuments...ng%20eBook.pdf

You may or may not get paid more. You may or may not have more opportunities open to you. It depends on the employer and sector (some sectors seem to appreciate professional registration more than others, generally).

You don't need to move between sectors but you do need to gain enough experience in the requisite competencies, which may require you to move roles or even employers if your current role is not providing you with enough experience.
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Bioluminescence1
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(Original post by Smack)
This link should help you out:

http://www.engc.org.uk/engcdocuments...ng%20eBook.pdf

You may or may not get paid more. You may or may not have more opportunities open to you. It depends on the employer and sector (some sectors seem to appreciate professional registration more than others, generally).

You don't need to move between sectors but you do need to gain enough experience in the requisite competencies, which may require you to move roles or even employers if your current role is not providing you with enough experience.
Thanks for the link!
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Smack
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(Original post by Bioluminescence1)
Thanks for the link!
It's also worth pointing out that some companies have graduate schemes that are accredited by the respective institute, such that on completion you should be ready for chartership. This usually takes approximately four years, and is probably the quickest way to achieve it.
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Bioluminescence1
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(Original post by Smack)
It's also worth pointing out that some companies have graduate schemes that are accredited by the respective institute, such that on completion you should be ready for chartership. This usually takes approximately four years, and is probably the quickest way to achieve it.

Thanks for your input!

Are you a chartered engineer yourself? Would you say the 'additional work' to get chartered was worth your time?

I ask because I think the sector I end up in will just depend on what graduate job I can find. I've also noticed that many companies in certain sectors have graduate schemes that aren't accredited by a professional body. So if I couldn't immediately secure a job within my desired sector then later move to a company in a different sector that was accredited, the 2/3 years of experience would essentially be irrelevant as far as chartership is concerned?

Of course I don't plan on being unable to find my perfect graduate job, but seeing how competitive it is out there has made me question my chances.
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Smack
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(Original post by Bioluminescence1)
Thanks for your input!

Are you a chartered engineer yourself? Would you say the 'additional work' to get chartered was worth your time?

I ask because I think the sector I end up in will just depend on what graduate job I can find. I've also noticed that many companies in certain sectors have graduate schemes that aren't accredited by a professional body. So if I couldn't immediately secure a job within my desired sector then later move to a company in a different sector that was accredited, the 2/3 years of experience would essentially be irrelevant as far as chartership is concerned?

Of course I don't plan on being unable to find my perfect graduate job, but seeing how competitive it is out there has made me question my chances.
I'm not a chartered engineer.

Your experience does not need to be with an accredited company. As long as it is of the right level, and enough to meet the required competencies, you can go for chartership. It's mainly the very largest companies that offer accredited training schemes.

Since you mentioned chemical engineering, here are the ones accredited by the IChemE:

http://www.icheme.org/careers/acts/acts_companies.aspx

But you don't need to have ever worked at any of the above organisations to get chartered.
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Bioluminescence1
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(Original post by Smack)
I'm not a chartered engineer.

Your experience does not need to be with an accredited company. As long as it is of the right level, and enough to meet the required competencies, you can go for chartership. It's mainly the very largest companies that offer accredited training schemes.

Since you mentioned chemical engineering, here are the ones accredited by the IChemE:

http://www.icheme.org/careers/acts/acts_companies.aspx

But you don't need to have ever worked at any of the above organisations to get chartered.
Oh right, I completely had the wrong idea! Thanks for clarifying
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ninmurai
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I am a Chartered Engineer myself (and an examiner!) with the IMechE.

The way to get chartered varies by institution, but all require you to demonstrate Master's degree level knowledge. Note that 'demonstration' does not necessarily mean you need to have an MEng or MSc, but obviously having an accredited degree will greatly help and check off that item. You then need to have some period of working experience, typically in the 5-10 year range depending on how quickly you get promoted and take on responsibilities. The final exams range all require an interview ranging from 45-90mins but the likes of Institution of Civil Engineers require a 2 hour timed essay on top, and the Institution of Structural Engineers require a 7 hour design exam, which has a very low pass rate, generally around the 28% mark.

The biggest benefit I see is when you need to change jobs or apply for a visa to a new country, or seek equivalence of your professional status somewhere else. In the UK many companies simply will not hire you if you are not a Chartered Engineer and have more than around 5-10 years of working experience.

For things like visa applications, many institutions have "Mutual Recognition Agreements" with engineering bodies in other countries. If I look at Australia one of the pre-requisites for their Skilled Independent Visa (Subclass 189) which is just about their highest class of visa (highly-skilled, no job offer needed at time of application, instantly grants Permanent Residence), most of the professions require certification from Engineers Australia, of which being a Chartered Engineer in the UK is one route to acceptance.
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Smack
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(Original post by ninmurai)
The way to get chartered varies by institution, but all require you to demonstrate Master's degree level knowledge. Note that 'demonstration' does not necessarily mean you need to have an MEng or MSc, but obviously having an accredited degree will greatly help and check off that item.
Do you have any more detail or information on what would or could be considered as demonstrating master's level knowledge? I've heard this from various sources, not least from the IMechE themselves and the UK-SPEC, but I'm not very sure of how this is actually determined.
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ninmurai
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(Original post by Smack)
Do you have any more detail or information on what would or could be considered as demonstrating master's level knowledge? I've heard this from various sources, not least from the IMechE themselves and the UK-SPEC, but I'm not very sure of how this is actually determined.
There are a few ways, but most notably and favourably:
1) You can submit papers and get them published in journals or conferences. They obviously need to be at the right level
2) You can write in-house documents for the company you work at which clearly show your aptitude for academic knowledge
3) The project you work on requires such advanced knowledge (for instance, developing new algorithms which require heavy uni-level calculus) that it demonstrates your ability in its own merit.

There are some other ways, but these offer the most solid evidence.
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