The ultimate final year NON-LAW thread Watch

naelse
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#61
Report 11 years ago
#61
Bakers is really lovely. It's one of the most international of the mid-sized firms, if that's your thing, and everyone I met there on the open day was really down to earth and friendly. Even the managing partner took time out to chat to us when we were having lunch, and when we had our tour around the office it all was so laid back and normal. Cool building and quirky little art displays too

Plus, you can only do a few vac schemes, and getting vac schemes doesn't guarantee you offers from those firms. I'd definitely apply to more. It's probabaly a good idea to have a few back up firms that you apply to without a vac scheme, even if you're dead set on one or two in particular.
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TKR
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#62
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#62
Oh I will definitely be applying to more TCs than the number of firms I did Vac schemes with, it's just that given the choice I'd like to do both so I have a better idea of what I'm letting myself in for. Was that an open day that you had to apply online for?
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naelse
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#63
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#63
I applied to the vac scheme online, was unsuccessful but they offered me an open day instead. I think you can apply to just an open day, but I suspect it's the same online form as the vac scheme and tc (CVmail, with covering letter)
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city_chic
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#64
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#64
It takes like four years after a non-law degree to train for a legal profession, right?
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Zarathustra
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#65
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#65
(Original post by city_chic)
It takes like four years after a non-law degree to train for a legal profession, right?
Yup. One year conversion (GDL), one year LPC, two years training contract. It's only one year more than for those with a law degree though! That is, unless you decide to do a longer course than the GDL...

EDIT: For a solicitor, that is. Otherwise substitute LPC for BVC and training contract for pupillage.
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silence
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#66
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#66
it is four years if you count the training contract; however, whilst doing your training contract, you will be paid a decent salary and be doing actual work in the firm for ongoing deals. in that sense, it's nothing like the training (in terms of cost and what you get up to) that you'd have at law school in the two years beforehand.
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city_chic
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#67
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#67
How many non-law students consider and end up doing Law? Law is a career I'm only now looking into, although I think I'll do a modern language degree, as I'm not confident that Law is for me and so wouldn't want to make a mistake. Being a solicitor kind of appeals to me. If I ended up doing that career, I'd be qualified at 26, right? Is that good?
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TKR
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#68
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#68
Got a reply from Bakers:

(Original post by Bakers Graduate Recruitment)
Dear ****,

Thank you for your email.

Due to the tremendous demand for places, we have had to restrict
eligibility for the vacation scheme to those students who are in their
penultimate year of full time study in the UK. For this reason, I am
afraid that the scheme is not available to non-law students who are
entering their final year of study this October.

Thank you for your interest in Baker & McKenzie, I wish you success in
finding a suitable placement.

Kind regards

Clare
I'm quite surprised! Does anyone know of any other big firms that don't have a vac scheme for final year non-laws?
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silence
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#69
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#69
that's mad! i haven't come across such a thing yet.
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DarkLight18
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#70
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#70
Im just about to start my second year of English, I plan to travel for a year after my degree also. That would mean I would start to my CPE/GDL in 2010. So when should I apply for my vac schemes and training contact? Will Law firms mind that im going traveling after my degree??
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TKR
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#71
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#71
big firms dont mind: you can apply as if you're not going travelling and then ask for a deferral i think... though not sure if you can do that before the LPC or only before the TC
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bleugh
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#72
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#72
What do people think of this?:

http://www.thelawyer.com/cgi-bin/ite...86&h=388&f=387

For those who can't be bothered to read it, the Learning and Skills Council have recently instructed the three banks who offer Career Development Loans not to give them to GDL students because the course does not lead directly to employment.

Obviously there are still professional studies loans to be had, but their interest rates and repayment holiday are not as favourable. I think it's really stupid and will make life very difficult for lots of converts to the law. How on earth can they say that the course doesn't lead to a job? But anyway, perhaps something for non-law students to be be aware of.
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Lewisy-boy
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#73
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#73
Wow, that is harsh, although I guess it doesn't lead directly to a job by any stretch of the imagination.
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naelse
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#74
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#74
Great. Just.. great.

This basically means that students without wealthy parents to help them out are disadvantaged.
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Zarathustra
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#75
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#75
Does this mean that the arrangements between some banks and GDL/LPC providers will just be cancelled (at least with respect to the GDL)?
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Lewisy-boy
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#76
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#76
Maybe, I guess you'll just have to wait and see!
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bleugh
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#77
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#77
As far as I am aware none of the three banks have arrangements with GDL providers for Career Development Loans; I know College of Law have an arrangement with Natwest for the Professional Trainee Loan, but that's different to a CDL because it is completely unsubsidised and charges a commercial rate of interest. Whilst the GDL doesn't lead directly to a job, it clearly does lead to entry into a profession as it acts as the academic stage of qualifying as a solicitor or barrister. I just think the whole thing is incredibly unfair on poorer students who are unable to secure a training contract first time round, as well as people who want to do legal aid work or go to the bar.
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Zarathustra
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#78
Report 11 years ago
#78
(Original post by bleugh)
As far as I am aware none of the three banks have arrangements with GDL providers for Career Development Loans; I know College of Law have an arrangement with Natwest for the Professional Trainee Loan, but that's different to a CDL because it is completely unsubsidised and charges a commercial rate of interest.
Ah, ok. I must have been confusing CDL / PTL - my bad, sorry!
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Alan Smithee
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#79
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#79
(Original post by naelse)
Great. Just.. great.

This basically means that students without wealthy parents to help them out are disadvantaged.
No it doesn't. It means that you can just take out professional training loans with banks like NatWest, Barclays and HSBC.

They are at similar low rates of interest.
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always + forever
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#80
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#80
To add my two cents, I began the GDL without a training contract. I have since managed to secure one, but there were many people on my course who have not done so. From my own experience, many people embark upon the GDL without really assessing their chances of gaining a TC and after a year either decide not to continue into the legal profession, or start the LPC, once again without any real sense of direction, only to end up an overqualified temp. By restricting the availability of loans, people who have failed to realise the competitiveness of the profession will not be lead astray by GDL providers who will let them on the course with CDD A-levels and a 2:2.

Additionally, I don't think this impacts the poorer students significantly: firstly, you can still get commercial loans. Whilst they're not great, the amount you can borrow with a CDL is capped (as far as I recall) so if you want a significant amount, you're going to have to get a commercial loan anyway. Secondly, if you get into a City firm whilst you're on your GDL, they will most likely pay your fees and living expenses, thereby enabling you to pay back the loan very quickly. Additionally, most firms pay for both GDL and LPC: if you don't get a TC in your final year, there is nothing that says that you have to go straight onto the GDL, and in fact, many people do take some time to work.
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