The ultimate final year NON-LAW thread Watch

naelse
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#101
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#101
I would say no more than a side for a covering letter. The CV can be two sides if that would help. Instead of thinking of how to fit everything in, try to think of a few things that this particular firm would be interested in, and really highlight those. Everything else can be summarised on the CV.
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TKR
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#102
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#102
Thanks for the advice naelse. Just to show my complete retardedness, I never knew before the other day that there is this apparent rule where your CV must not be more than 2 pages long... where did that come from? Keeping my CV to 2 pages and CL to 1 wasn't actually that difficult in the end but I wondered if having a 3 page CV was the kind of mistake that would get an application thrown in the bin...?
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naelse
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#103
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#103
I doubt it would be thrown in the bin, but you run the risk of them not reading all of it/zoning out half way through if they think it's too long. For the same reason try to use short sentences that go straight to the point. They have thousands of these to read, so the more reader-friendly you can make yours the better.
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silence
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#104
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#104
my cv is four pages long. perhaps it's time to start editing. though the first two pages are taken up by personal details and exam grades (listed in a column).
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naelse
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#105
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#105
The careers service at my uni suggest having a "base" CV, that has everything on it, and then pick out the aspects that are most important for each particular firm.

I've also cut down on space by not putting personal details and referees on my CV when these details are on other parts of the application (i.e on CVmail)
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TKR
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#106
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#106
Well slaughters app asks for your uni and a level grades as well as referees and address etc in the form so I didn't need to put them in. Without them I had three pages but just decided to cut out a couple of less relevant things: weird to have one's life condensed like that though!
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acc21
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#107
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#107
hi everybody, this thread is really useful for us non-law students so i thought i'd ask a few questions as i'm getting into a bit of a funk over this whole GDL/placement/TC thing.

like a lot of others on here, i really don't want to do commercial law- i have absolutely no desire to work in a large city firm or anything corporate- my degree is english and my background of work is with children and families- i'm coming at it from a social angle. i used to work with disadvantaged children, so my motivation is a desire to help arrange things and help people with their families and relationships. i'd be interested in family and child law, maybe immigration law and yes, legal-aid clients.

Most of the talk ive heard is about getting big training contracts on big money and etc etc. Ultimately, i'd like to work in a high street niche practice or work for the government.

So, i'm not sure how to proceed. Like many others, i agree that students wanting to do non commercial law, and who are from low income/haven't got GDL fees- as if! families are disadvantaged. Is there any way around this? i've got AAD (don't ask!!) at a-level and i expect a first or a 2.1 in my degree. i've applied to the CAB and the immigration service for work experience. And now i'm looking for vac schemes- i have no idea what the process is for training contracts for somebody in my position. ive done lots of research but found very little to formally apply for here in leicester- so i need to start speculatively applying, but am i too soon? what is the proceedure for somebody in my position?

I'm really worried about all this and ive been doing so much reading its been driving me crackers!

oh and does anybody else feel just a little daft saying " i'm asking you to sponsor me- but ive had no legal training!" gargh! its mad!

Any advice would be gratefully taken! thanks!
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The_Historian
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#108
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#108
Apologies for posting on a "final year" thread, when my question is related to the second year. I am currently about to embark on my second year of a history course and have started to look at the possibility of a career in law. I plan on seeing the career's advisor when I return to university and will hopefully then have a better idea on the process, however after browsing this thread have a few questions which hopefully someone will be able to answer.

My questions are in relation to the process of converting from my current degree to a career in law and the best route of doing so. From what I can see the Vac scheme is the best way of gaining experience. As a non-law student - when would I need to do this? (the summer of the second year or third?). When would the applications for this begin and what would they be looking for any experience?

In relation to the TC and conversion year, when would this need to be done? (the beginning of the third year?) I would appreciate if possible any advise on where I can find information about this, as I am currently clueless into what the TC involves and what the process of applying is.

I apologise if it appears that I am asking these questions out of laziness of not finding the information myself. Currently I am lost on where to look and how to find information and have picked up pieces of information from here-there and everywhere, without actually getting any idea on how the process works.
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Reema
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#109
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#109
Most non-law students get vacation schemes over the Christmas of their final year, and then apply around the same time or soon after (December - January) for training contracts, although applications for training contracts can open as early as October. Some firms do give vacation schemes extra early to non law students over the summer. Take your vacation scheme applications as seriously as you would a training contract - places on them are very competitive.

Applications for the conversion course can be between November - February.

For a good overview and more information, try lawcareers.net or the Chambers & Partners Student Guide, which your careers service should supply for free. Hope that helps.
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The_Historian
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#110
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#110
(Original post by Reema)
Most non-law students get vacation schemes over the Christmas of their final year, and then apply around the same time or soon after (December - January) for training contracts, although applications for training contracts can open as early as October. Some firms do give vacation schemes extra early to non law students over the summer. Take your vacation scheme applications as seriously as you would a training contract - places on them are very competitive.

Applications for the conversion course can be between November - February.

For a good overview and more information, try lawcareers.net or the Chambers & Partners Student Guide, which your careers service should supply for free. Hope that helps.
Thanks!
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silence
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#111
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#111
hope everyone doesn't have too busy a day today
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Desmond Hume
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#112
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#112
Been quite busy for me. Read about it by clicking on the link below.
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silence
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#113
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#113
here's a hypothetical question: if a final year non-law student failed to get onto any of the christmas schemes, would it be quite an ominous situation? and would it make getting a training contract harder? i.e. is have done a vac scheme (at any firm) generally considered a prerequisite for getting a TC?

or is there plenty of time to try and get a summer vac scheme (to be done upon graduation) and then get a TC?

i suppose what i'm asking is that if one fails to secure any vac schemes for over christmas, would it be better to wait until some vac scheme work had been secured before going ahead with TC applications?
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bleugh
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#114
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#114
I know plenty of non-law people who have got TCs without having done any vac schemes, so don't worry too much. Only a small number of firms actually run Christmas schemes anyway. Lots will give Easter or summer scheme places to non-law students so don't worry.
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naelse
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#115
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#115
I got the JD placement!!
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silence
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#116
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#116
(Original post by naelse)
I got the JD placement!!
well done i missed out on that one. have four more applications pending at the moment, so will see where they go.
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Paulsch1986
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#117
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#117
Alright there everyone, I'm a final year History student at Royal Holloway looking to change to law but literally have no idea where to start in terms of changing. I heard something about doing a GDL but I've got no idea about anything else. Please help as any suggestions or advice welcome!
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TKR
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#118
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#118
Argh! Does anyone else find the variability in the length of app forms really annoying? Lovells with their 8 or so 250 worders and 1400 characters to talk about each work experience took me a good while, whereas A&O have just 3 250ers and a measly 50 word limit on each work experience - it's hard to fit in everything that I want to say!

Why am I doing app forms at 11:49pm? God knows.
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naelse
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#119
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#119
(Original post by Paulsch1986)
Alright there everyone, I'm a final year History student at Royal Holloway looking to change to law but literally have no idea where to start in terms of changing. I heard something about doing a GDL but I've got no idea about anything else. Please help as any suggestions or advice welcome!
To give yourself the best chance, you need to start as soon as possible. Your first step is to gather as many law brochures together as you can. Find out the difference between barristers and solicitors and decide which one you want to be, as the path to qualification is different for each. Then, think about what area of law you want to go into. Again, what you do from then on really depends on what kind of lawyer you want to be. Most people on here are working towards becoming commercial solicitors, so the advice you see here may not actually apply to you, depending on what you decide to do. Additionally, you will need to decide on a law school for your GDL/CPE. Applications are done centrally here http://www.lawcabs.ac.uk/ between Nov 1st and Feb 1st, and they also provide a list of GDL providers.

Good luck!
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naelse
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#120
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#120
(Original post by TKR)
Argh! Does anyone else find the variability in the length of app forms really annoying? Lovells with their 8 or so 250 worders and 1400 characters to talk about each work experience took me a good while, whereas A&O have just 3 250ers and a measly 50 word limit on each work experience - it's hard to fit in everything that I want to say!

Why am I doing app forms at 11:49pm? God knows.

My favourite is Norton Rose with their four 150 worders. That took me an evening.

EDIT: Quite clearly I rushed: I just found a spelling mistake in it
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