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    Hey guys. I need help. I'm currently in my THIRD year of nursing, but I'm starting to wonder if I should've picked a more science related topic. I really enjoy learning about the medical side of things, I like chemistry, although not amazing at it, I love anatomy and physiology, pathology, pathophysiology and the study of disease. I'm interested in neuroscience and cardiology as well as a high interest in learning about drugs (illicit and prescription), neurotransmitters and toxicology.

    I got my friend in to science in about year 10 at school, I must admit I am jealous that (even though I excelled more at it and did A levels, when she didn't) she has now gotten a masters, is going on to do a PHD and has a job in research of genetics and disease.

    I really am not going to drop out-- but i dont know what to do because I dont know if its the right path to take, I do like my A&E placements and like to help people, but i'm just feeling really stuck, I dunno if theres a masters i can take that will allow a more scienc-e-y job or what even job im suited to?!
    All opinions and experiences welcome NEED HELP
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    There's nothing wrong with discovering an interest later in life. There's no "should have" about it. You did what you did and now you want something different. That's fine. You're still headed into a good job today.*

    You mention being jealous of your friend. What exactly is it that you're jealous of? Her earning prospects? The fact that she gets to call herself Doctor and put a load of letters after her name? I mention those first because those aren't insignificant things. They often do feature quite heavily in people's mind where jealousy or envy are concerned.*

    Let's think about her job for a minute. What aspects of her job do you envy? The fact that she gets to do research? The field that she's in? Her skills? You need to be fairly specific. You went into nursing knowing you were being trained in a very specific skills set that you would be using in everyday life. You don't get into nursing without wanting to care for people, so I'd be surprised if that's something you just wanted to give up altogether. Bear in mind that all the allied health professions use specific scientific knowledge at some level in order to provide care, so you're not out of science altogether.*

    If it's a different skills set altogether that you're wanting to acquire and use, you could consider going into clinical research. That gives you the chance to use statistics, test theories, collect data etc. Is that what you're interested in? That doesn't require you to retrain. Here's an example of a Master's degree in this that you'll be eminently qualified for at the end of your degree:*http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgradu...arch-mres.aspx

    But maybe you're wanting to switch fields altogether. You mention quite a few things that you're interested in. There's a strong chance you could go on to do any one of those at Master's level as a conversion. My anatomy professor was a former nurse and she converted to anatomy and physiology after six years working as a nurse.*

    Don't assume you're committed to one career because your first degree is nursing. You've got a very good set of academic skills as well as practical skills and no one will sniff at them. That's what postgraduate education is for: to build on the learning, knowledge and skills you learned at undergraduate level. If you're interested in any of the things you mentioned, there will be a Master's degree that you'll be eligible for. If it's medicine you're interested in, then there's always converting to that. You're not stuck and you have the benefit of being able to go into a well-paid job to support your studies. **
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    a lot of nurses have decided to complete a masters in public health.

    I'm not sure where this leads, but I have been told they make a lot of money if successful in completing it.


    you could also do a masters in physiotherapy, or occupational therapy.

    you have a lot of choices. don't let other peoples success make you think you're doing something wrong
    life is a marathon not a sprint
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    (Original post by EmiliaLoyd)
    Hey guys. I need help. I'm currently in my THIRD year of nursing, but I'm starting to wonder if I should've picked a more science related topic. I really enjoy learning about the medical side of things, I like chemistry, although not amazing at it, I love anatomy and physiology, pathology, pathophysiology and the study of disease. I'm interested in neuroscience and cardiology as well as a high interest in learning about drugs (illicit and prescription), neurotransmitters and toxicology.

    I got my friend in to science in about year 10 at school, I must admit I am jealous that (even though I excelled more at it and did A levels, when she didn't) she has now gotten a masters, is going on to do a PHD and has a job in research of genetics and disease.

    I really am not going to drop out-- but i dont know what to do because I dont know if its the right path to take, I do like my A&E placements and like to help people, but i'm just feeling really stuck, I dunno if theres a masters i can take that will allow a more scienc-e-y job or what even job im suited to?!
    All opinions and experiences welcome NEED HELP
    If you're in third year i'd say stick it out and specialise in a masters. I'm in a similar position though, I just gave up medicinal chem for nursing and wondering if i have made the wrong choice as I love learning about drugs too. Also i get the jealousy thing, (although i hate working in labs) its because your friends course is more in depth science and gets to do research? This is why I think I may have made the wrong decision.
 
 
 
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