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    At Alevel I'm taking maths biology psychology and either chemistry it English lit I want to get a job which involves working with the brain what degree should I go for/ job suggestions
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    Psychology isn't a bad option. People talk it down but there are a lot of career options. You can specialise - I know someone who did psychology undergrad and now they're doing a masters in cognitive neuropsychology.

    You can go into clinical psychology, research, teaching, and so on. What you cannot do is become a psychiatrist - I once met someone in their first year of a psychology degree, who hadn't realised this!!

    If you do psychology at uni, I would recommend choosing one which includes a placement year. One such uni is Aston University. Because psychology is an oversubscribed subject, it helps to do a placement year to get industry experience.
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    (Original post by abc:))
    Psychology isn't a bad option. People talk it down but there are a lot of career options. You can specialise - I know someone who did psychology undergrad and now they're doing a masters in cognitive neuropsychology.

    You can go into clinical psychology, research, teaching, and so on. What you cannot do is become a psychiatrist - I once met someone in their first year of a psychology degree, who hadn't realised this!!

    If you do psychology at uni, I would recommend choosing one which includes a placement year. One such uni is Aston University. Because psychology is an oversubscribed subject, it helps to do a placement year to get industry experience.
    I was thinking of becoming a neuropsychologist do you know what alevels you need to take to become a neuropsychologist or any specific degree you need to take??
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    (Original post by Sophie mac)
    I was thinking of becoming a neuropsychologist do you know what alevels you need to take to become a neuropsychologist or any specific degree you need to take??
    Biology, chemistry, maths and psychology
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    (Original post by Sophie mac)
    I was thinking of becoming a neuropsychologist do you know what alevels you need to take to become a neuropsychologist or any specific degree you need to take??
    What do you understand a neuropsychologist to be? It's not really a thing.*

    Do you want to work with people in a therapeutic way or do you just want to study them?

    There are three main strands of psychology. There are professional psychologists who work in clinical, educational, and counselling psychology. Then there's academic psychologists who do research on behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology etc. Then there's applied psychologists such as sports psychologists, business psychologists and occupational psychologists. Some people might argue about the categories I've used, but in terms of people with psychology in their job title, that's about your lot.*

    Then there's things such as psychiatric nurses, counsellors (not counselling psychologists), psychotherapists, mental health workers, advocates etc. where a degree in psychology is highly desirable although not specifically required. Those are your options.*
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    Like I said, not sure exactly what you understand by neuropsychologist, but probably the closest thing would be a neuroscience degree. Most ask for biology (or psychology as a substitute) as a specific subject and then high grades in two others. Maths is highly beneficial for any psychology degree. The sciences do help and some courses probably ask for them, but any facilitating subject would be acceptable as a third option.*
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    (Original post by Sophie mac)
    I was thinking of becoming a neuropsychologist do you know what alevels you need to take to become a neuropsychologist or any specific degree you need to take??
    http://careers.bps.org.uk/area/neuro

    "you first need to be a Chartered Psychologist within the field of clinical or educational psychology"

    DClin or EdDClin courses are extremely competitive. http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/wiki/artic...es-information is worth a look for more information about what experiences and marks you'll need to look for from your BSc.
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    (Original post by giella)
    What do you understand a neuropsychologist to be? It's not really a thing.*

    Do you want to work with people in a therapeutic way or do you just want to study them?

    There are three main strands of psychology. There are professional psychologists who work in clinical, educational, and counselling psychology. Then there's academic psychologists who do research on behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology etc. Then there's applied psychologists such as sports psychologists, business psychologists and occupational psychologists. Some people might argue about the categories I've used, but in terms of people with psychology in their job title, that's about your lot.*

    Then there's things such as psychiatric nurses, counsellors (not counselling psychologists), psychotherapists, mental health workers, advocates etc. where a degree in psychology is highly desirable although not specifically required. Those are your options.*
    A neuropsychologist is a psychologist who specializes in understanding the relationship between the physical brain and behavior. The brain is complex. Disorders within the brain and nervous system can alter behavior and cognitive function

    Study them
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    (Original post by Sophie mac)
    A neuropsychologist is a psychologist who specializes in understanding the relationship between the physical brain and behavior. The brain is complex. Disorders within the brain and nervous system can alter behavior and cognitive function

    Study them
    Okay, so you're wanting to do it as an academic specialism then. As opposed to social psychology, for instance.

    *There's a few routes you can take. One is to start off with a basic psychology degree that gets you chartered status. That one gives you the most options. You can specialise later at postgraduate level either in a clinical/educational or in an academic setting. You could also do a joint honours degree, as long as you get chartered status. *

    You could do also just do a neuropsychology degree but these are not very common and may not necessarily give you chartered status. Far more common are neuroscience degrees, which again don't necessarily give you chartered status but may give you more flexibility in terms of later study options.

    *A friend of mine did psychology undergrad, then did neuroscience at master's level and is now doing a PhD in Psychology of Learning and Development with additional funding for a neuroimaging component. Her route didn't rule anything out. Along the way she did a PGCE and even contemplated doing Educational Psychology for a while as a professional doctorate. The chartered status she had gave her the most options. She also got funding every step of the way once she reached postgraduate level, so don't worry about not specialising too soon.

    Degrees in Experimental Psychology and PPP (Psychology, Physiology and Philosophy) from highly reputable universities like UCL, York and Oxford are becoming more and more like neuroscience degrees anyway so if you go for something like that, you'll have the opportunity to specialise in your undergraduate degree as well. *A psychology degree isn't a psychology degree isn't a psychology degree. There's a lot of variation. Some allow a lot of specialisation and some are far more rigid. Some are more geared towards social psychology and others towards behavioural. It's a similar thing with linguistics degrees actually.

    The type of degree you want to do determines the A level options you do, though. The course at Oxford requires a science A level, perhaps 2 (I can't recall) so biology would be a must for that. Biology will open up the most options to you. Doing A Level Psychology is not an advantage and is rarely if ever a requirement. Having done it and getting more psychology students every year for private tuition than my other subjects put together, I would warn you to approach this subject with caution in sixth form. Teaching is notoriously patchy for psychology so scrutinise the teaching record heavily. If there's a lower than 40% A*-B rate, you need to back away.
 
 
 
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