Is the open universities "BSc (Honours) Computing and IT" course comparible?

Watch
trotski94
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I have been a software developer working in the industry for about ~5 years now.
I am looking at doing Open Universities "BSc (Honours) Computing and IT" degree course, but am wondering how this stands up to other degrees.
Does anyone know how this would compare to say, a computer science degree from an "average" university? Are there many other universities that offer degrees similar to a "BSc (Honours) Computing and IT"?
0
reply
Sydmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by trotski94)
I have been a software developer working in the industry for about ~5 years now.
I am looking at doing Open Universities "BSc (Honours) Computing and IT" degree course, but am wondering how this stands up to other degrees.
Does anyone know how this would compare to say, a computer science degree from an "average" university? Are there many other universities that offer degrees similar to a "BSc (Honours) Computing and IT"?
Do you have the course syllabus to hand? The "...and IT" bit sounds like it expands onto IT in the enterprise; could be wrong, but most degree titles I've come across which have "IT" in them have non-technical modules geared towards management and HR etc.
0
reply
trotski94
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by SpiffyTheSeal)
Do you have the course syllabus to hand? The "...and IT" bit sounds like it expands onto IT in the enterprise; could be wrong, but most degree titles I've come across which have "IT" in them have non-technical modules geared towards management and HR etc.
I do not believe that to be the case, it would appear it goes more into the applications of computers and IT, including robotics, networking, hardware and even the social implications of computers..

If you can derive any other implications from the website, http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q62 , I'd be interested to hear them.
0
reply
Sydmin
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by trotski94)
I do not believe that to be the case, it would appear it goes more into the applications of computers and IT, including robotics, networking, hardware and even the social implications of computers..

If you can derive any other implications from the website, http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q62 , I'd be interested to hear them.
It doesn't look to fall into the trap of "soft IT", which I was nattering on about above. Instead it looks like a pretty broad and varied degree, which one the one hand could be great as it covers many different aspects of the industry but on the other hand it could teach you too much of too little if you get what I mean?

If you already have commercial dev experience in the industry, it might pay to specialise in a certain area. A degree too broad might end up teaching you to suck eggs and at the end of it, you might have a piece of paper but not necessarily learnt much new stuff? Your time in industry thus far should have exposed you to a lot of technologies already. You could take one of those that interest you and take a degree title that is more targeted, that could serve you better when applying for roles in that sector of the industry as a postgrad. That's the route I would choose - I wouldn't want a degree that did everything, I would want one that did a subset and did it well. Personally, anyway.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (193)
14.31%
I'm not sure (60)
4.45%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (393)
29.13%
I have already dropped out (37)
2.74%
I'm not a current university student (666)
49.37%

Watched Threads

View All