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    I'm either going to a grammar school or a college for sixth form. I have not yet decided on which one I shall go to.

    I do fancy a bit of a change from my normal school surroundings and I would also like to meet new people. So this is why I am considering college.

    What is college like? Is it more exciting than a sixth form at a school? Is the class work more independent?

    Also, I have picked Psychology as an A-level option...what is psychology like?
    Is it quite sciency? (I'm not got at Science. I got 2 Bs for Biology and Physics and a below C grade in Chemistry). Is it a lot of work? And is it difficult? Also, is it less work than GCSE Art?

    Any replies would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by cookie123456789)
    I'm either going to a grammar school or a college for sixth form. I have not yet decided on which one I shall go to.

    I do fancy a bit of a change from my normal school surroundings and I would also like to meet new people. So this is why I am considering college.

    What is college like? Is it more exciting than a sixth form at a school? Is the class work more independent?

    Also, I have picked Psychology as an A-level option...what is psychology like?
    Is it quite sciency? (I'm not got at Science. I got 2 Bs for Biology and Physics and a below C grade in Chemistry). Is it a lot of work? And is it difficult? Also, is it less work than GCSE Art?

    Any replies would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.
    I would doubt that an A-level requires less work than a GCSE. Art may come closest, though.
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    (Original post by cookie123456789)
    Thanks.
    I chose my college over my local 6th form
    This was mainly because I went to it as my school and it was shocking, therefore I did not return there again :mmm:As my friends are all there and whenever we meet up, I get told all about their gossip
    I can tell u that there are a few differences: 6th forms tend to be smaller, closer and same for classes sizes
    College = larger, not as close - u'll make friends but it is unlikely you'll get to know everyone in your class well unless the class size is small (ie: my french class was so small and cute and :daydreaming: now i dropped it lol)
    As for psychology, I did it GCSE and almost did it A-Level but I didn't want all that work.
    It involves a lot of remembering studies and evaluating them and having to write a lot.

    I only found learning stuff hard - the actual GCSE conent wasn't too bad but I am aware that at A-level u do some more interesting stuff like attachment and depression and stuff, so good luck and have fun
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    My school's Sixth Form was in partnership with a local college so I ended up going to school and college for my A Levels so hopefully I can help you! I took Biology, Maths, Chemistry and Religious Studies at my school and Psychology in the college.

    There is a lot more freedom in college. We called my Psychology teacher by her first name and she'd tell us lots of fun stories about her life, while at school the teachers were basically the same as they were at GCSEs. I would say the work was similar in both, you're given a lot more freedom and if you don't do the work they aren't really going to force you to. If I had to chose I would say college gave you more independence in your work though, but not by a huge amount (it may depend on your school - my school was terrible so a grammar school might keep more of an eye on you!). College was more exciting in terms of parties, school was a lot more relaxed. Class sizes were similar for me (around 20 in the class for AS and 10-15 for A2), but some options are more popular than others.

    I preferred my school. I liked the freedom college gave me, but I liked the people at school a lot better. Most of the people in college were the people I was very happy not to have to see again after GCSEs so I didn't feel very comfortable there. If the college your looking at is good though I can't imagine you would have that problem!

    Having done science subjects for A Level I can promise you Psychology is not science-y. There is a lot of content and, while I didn't think it was hard, it was hard to revise for because of how much there was to learn. The people who liked the subject in my class tended to do better than the other people because they had more motivation to learn, so hopefully you enjoy it! I also did GCSE Art and the amount of time I spent on both was kind of similar. For both I avoided it until a month before the exam/coursework deadline and then spent around four hours a day on it. It depends how much time you spend on GCSE Art though and how well you learn, so I can't promise it will be similar for you!
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I would doubt that an A-level requires less work than a GCSE. Art may come closest, though.
    Ok would Art A level be more work than A level Psychology?


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    (Original post by CheeseIsVeg)
    I chose my college over my local 6th form
    This was mainly because I went to it as my school and it was shocking, therefore I did not return there again :mmm:As my friends are all there and whenever we meet up, I get told all about their gossip
    I can tell u that there are a few differences: 6th forms tend to be smaller, closer and same for classes sizes
    College = larger, not as close - u'll make friends but it is unlikely you'll get to know everyone in your class well unless the class size is small (ie: my french class was so small and cute and :daydreaming: now i dropped it lol)
    As for psychology, I did it GCSE and almost did it A-Level but I didn't want all that work.
    It involves a lot of remembering studies and evaluating them and having to write a lot.

    I only found learning stuff hard - the actual GCSE conent wasn't too bad but I am aware that at A-level u do some more interesting stuff like attachment and depression and stuff, so good luck and have fun
    Ok thank you!


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    (Original post by Firefly13)
    My school's Sixth Form was in partnership with a local college so I ended up going to school and college for my A Levels so hopefully I can help you! I took Biology, Maths, Chemistry and Religious Studies at my school and Psychology in the college.

    There is a lot more freedom in college. We called my Psychology teacher by her first name and she'd tell us lots of fun stories about her life, while at school the teachers were basically the same as they were at GCSEs. I would say the work was similar in both, you're given a lot more freedom and if you don't do the work they aren't really going to force you to. If I had to chose I would say college gave you more independence in your work though, but not by a huge amount (it may depend on your school - my school was terrible so a grammar school might keep more of an eye on you!). College was more exciting in terms of parties, school was a lot more relaxed. Class sizes were similar for me (around 20 in the class for AS and 10-15 for A2), but some options are more popular than others.

    I preferred my school. I liked the freedom college gave me, but I liked the people at school a lot better. Most of the people in college were the people I was very happy not to have to see again after GCSEs so I didn't feel very comfortable there. If the college your looking at is good though I can't imagine you would have that problem!

    Having done science subjects for A Level I can promise you Psychology is not science-y. There is a lot of content and, while I didn't think it was hard, it was hard to revise for because of how much there was to learn. The people who liked the subject in my class tended to do better than the other people because they had more motivation to learn, so hopefully you enjoy it! I also did GCSE Art and the amount of time I spent on both was kind of similar. For both I avoided it until a month before the exam/coursework deadline and then spent around four hours a day on it. It depends how much time you spend on GCSE Art though and how well you learn, so I can't promise it will be similar for you!
    Thank you for your very helpful in depth reply!!!



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