LSE vs Oxbridge Watch

tenjon
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Jonesy_LJ)
Try Stanley Baldwin by Philip Williamson, very good if you have any interest in British Politics between the wars.
I don't think that's quite the point; I don't think Shady Lane was asking for suggestions of good books by Durham professors to read at her leisure. I'm sure Durham academics have written loads of very good books. Her point was that in the course of her undergraduate and graduate degrees, she had not been obliged to read anything by someone who is at Durham, implying that literature from Oxbridge/London professors had cropped up.
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Franc Vouloir
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#82
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(Original post by sTe\/o)
Hmm, I would probably say in terms of competitiveness the order would be:

1. Oxbridge / LSE (Oxbridge slightly edging it, perhaps)
2. Imperial
3. Durham / Warwick
4. Bristol
5. The rest

Don't know if that's right, but it's just my own subjective impression. It also takes no account of the individual subject being applied for.
Well, if we're talking about purely statistical competitivity, Oxbridge wouldn't actually score very high due to self-selection. Illustration: the Cambridge college to which I aim to apply for English, one of the university's most popular courses, has, for the past three or four years, received approx. 30 applicants for approx. 10 places. This is, I believe, after approx. 5% de-selection pre-interview.
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#83
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(Original post by LGoddard)
Well, if we're talking about purely statistical competitivity, Oxbridge wouldn't actually score very high due to self-selection. Illustration: the Cambridge college to which I aim to apply for English, one of the university's most popular courses, has, for the past three or four years, received approx. 30 applicants for approx. 10 places. This is, I believe, after approx. 5% de-selection pre-interview.
But then those other universities give out three or four times as many offers as they have places, because they expect to be rejected by a substantial number of applicants. This rises to six times with certain universities in 'other'. Very few applicants reject Oxford/Cambridge if they can help it. So generally the applicants : offers ratio works out at around the same level as Oxbridge.
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Franc Vouloir
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#84
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(Original post by 3232)
But then those other universities give out three or four times as many offers as they have places, because they expect to be rejected by a substantial number of applicants. This rises to six times with certain universities in 'other'. Very few applicants reject Oxford/Cambridge if they can help it. So generally the applicants : offers ratio works out at around the same level as Oxbridge.
Ah, good point.
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shady lane
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#85
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(Original post by tom391)
I don't think that's quite the point; I don't think Shady Lane was asking for suggestions of good books by Durham professors to read at her leisure. I'm sure Durham academics have written loads of very good books. Her point was that in the course of her undergraduate and graduate degrees, she had not been obliged to read anything by someone who is at Durham, implying that literature from Oxbridge/London professors had cropped up.
Yes that's correct. You get loads of Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, KCL, and Warwick professors. I get the impression that Durham more focused on teaching than research, at least in my subject. Which wouldn't really make it comparable to Oxbridge as a university.
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coldfish
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#86
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Also remember that Durham is a relatively small university. iirc, it's not in the Russell Group not because its research quality isn't good, but because it just doesn't have the quantity of most other universities.
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Jonesy_LJ
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#87
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(Original post by tom391)
I don't think that's quite the point; I don't think Shady Lane was asking for suggestions of good books by Durham professors to read at her leisure. I'm sure Durham academics have written loads of very good books. Her point was that in the course of her undergraduate and graduate degrees, she had not been obliged to read anything by someone who is at Durham, implying that literature from Oxbridge/London professors had cropped up.
I just really enjoyed that book
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Nabster_88
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#88
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(Original post by coldfish)
Also remember that Durham is a relatively small university. iirc, it's not in the Russell Group not because its research quality isn't good, but because it just doesn't have the quantity of most other universities.
Sorry but what is IIRC:confused: ?????
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#89
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#89
If i remember correctly.
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kizer
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#90
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(Original post by coldfish)
Also remember that Durham is a relatively small university. iirc, it's not in the Russell Group not because its research quality isn't good, but because it just doesn't have the quantity of most other universities.
TOTAL STUDENTS:

Durham - 17,320

Oxford - 18,431
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Turdburger
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#91
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#91
Why is research so important if you are an undergrad. Surely being focused on teaching is a good thing.
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Nabster_88
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#92
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(Original post by 3232)
If i remember correctly.
oh..thanks
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Niccolo
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#93
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(Original post by Heartbreaker)
True, but it is probably more competitive than any other university to get into, including UCL, Warwick, Bristol etc. It gets an unnecessary slating on TSR for no good reason I can see.
It deserves a jolly good slating just for sheer impudence and delusions of grandeur. The grave of the Oxbridge reject, I say! Down with it!
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andthatswhy
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#94
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#94
It's just I've changed tripos, a lot, I know the basic literature for quite a few subjects, and I find the reading lists dominated by authors in Oxbridge, LSE, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford. The occasional exception of note are places like Manchester or Newcastle - MUP publishes a relatively high amount of my key reading actually.

On a different note, Durham, the kind of people who go there, is there not a certain Durham type? Why can't I shake off notions of rugby, binge drinking and really crappy ents.
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Turdburger
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#95
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#95
Yes I agree, Durham is a place where Middle class kids go to have a middle class time, and to avoid poor people.
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Consie
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#96
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#96
why is this argument still running? Reputation wise, which is all that matters, Oxbridge has, is, and always will be, a cut above, which is why the exlusive term 'Oxbridge' is still in use. Even if i dont make my offer, which may happen, im not going to start saying 'oh well actually Bristol has better teaching' or whatever. It doesnt matter, Oxbridge is the daddy, end of story.
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shady lane
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#97
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That's not really true though. It's only a cut above in prestige. If LSE were to offer one-to-one tutorials it would definitively kick Oxbridge's ass at nearly all subjects it offers. And a handful of US universities already kick Oxbridge's ass.
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sTe\/o
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#98
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(Original post by shady lane)
That's not really true though. It's only a cut above in prestige.
I agree. Everyone knows it's difficult to get into LSE.

If LSE were to offer one-to-one tutorials it would definitively kick Oxbridge's ass at nearly all subjects it offers.
Well, it would place it on a par... not sure why you say it would make it so much better, which is completely unsubstantiated.

And a handful of US universities already kick Oxbridge's ass.
Yes, Harvard, Harvard and Harvard. :p: And only for postgrad, mind.
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shady lane
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#99
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At least in what I study, LSE has significantly better academic staff (in terms of diversity of subjects studied, publications, consulting governments, etc.). Better staff + individual teaching = better than Oxbridge.
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Consie
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#100
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That's not really true though. It's only a cut above in prestige. If LSE were to offer one-to-one tutorials it would definitively kick Oxbridge's ass at nearly all subjects it offers. And a handful of US universities already kick Oxbridge's ass.
But that doesnt matter. Prestige is what matters. Why drive a Ferrari when a Fiesta gets more miles to the gallon?
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