Typical timetable at LSE Watch

SamLowry
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What would you guys say is the typical timetable at LSE?

How many hours a week did most of you do and how was this split up into (tutorials/lectures/seminars)?

I'd particularly like to hear from Acc&Fin Students but all replies are welcome!

Also how much time did you have to spend in individual study? Was it a case of chilling out in your spare time for most of the year except when you had deadlines for essays and revising for exams or were you constantly working to supplement your "daytime" teaching?
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davemarkey
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It is different for everyone, but an average student has 8 lectures and 4 classes. This may be arranged in a decent way so that you actually get a day off, or only have to go in until 1pm.

Or, it may be evil and be set so that you have 9am lecture, 5pm class, 7pm lecture! Then in between, you do what you want, but will probably be bored

I would say at least 10 hours a week outside of lectures is needed to keep up to date, and do work that needs to be submitted online. You can chill a bit in the 1st year, but obviously you need to work hard ALL THE TIME. If you fall behind no one will help you....unless you have really good friends who'll give you their notes :p:
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drs1357
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languages double your work load.
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alisama
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i had 4 hours of classes that were generally boring, some of which was useful but it was mainly just revising all the work i had done the week before. everyone just sits there for an hour trying as hard as possible to ignore eachother. then there were 8 hours of lectures, and i found these to be quite enjoyable for the most part. sometimes difficult to follow, and sometimes easy.

my timetable was a bit crap, i had to be at lse 3 times per week at 10am and once at 9am... only on tuesday could i get a lie in until 11...

aside from the standard 8/4 hours lectures/classes there were also some supplementary lectures/classes. i always went to the MA100 help session, and there was also a ST102 help session that u could of gone to.

as for the work outside of classes and lectures... obviously its not the same each week. sometimes there will be big pieces of work etc. i'd say on average for each of the 4 modules i did maybe 2-3 hours of work towards the exercises to be handed in the next week and maybe 1-2 hours of reading, so between 12-20 hours works extra per week. maybe more, i'm not entirely sure. the exercises themselves don't really take that long if you understand well what is going on, and you can just botch them and wait for ur classes to explain them. but i never really did that except in stats, and sometimes i would spend ages trying to understand the maths exercises. plus if u want to do all "compulsory" reading it may take ages. for the AC100 module for instance there is loads of reading, especially for management accounting, though it isn't necessary really. on the other hand EC102 reading is necessary in my opinion and there is a lot of that, as some of the concepts may be quite difficult to understand at first..

but of course you can be like my friend, who really did very little work, but still managed to get a first with a combination of last minute revision, a flukey EC102 mark and a very easy stats paper... but as davemarkey says, unless u work consistently hard it is very easy to fall behind..
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RJA
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(Original post by drs1357)
languages double your work load.
Seriously??
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drs1357
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(Original post by alisama)
i had 4 hours of classes that were generally boring, some of which was useful but it was mainly just revising all the work i had done the week before. everyone just sits there for an hour trying as hard as possible to ignore eachother. then there were 8 hours of lectures, and i found these to be quite enjoyable for the most part. sometimes difficult to follow, and sometimes easy.

my timetable was a bit crap, i had to be at lse 3 times per week at 10am and once at 9am... only on tuesday could i get a lie in until 11...

aside from the standard 8/4 hours lectures/classes there were also some supplementary lectures/classes. i always went to the MA100 help session, and there was also a ST102 help session that u could of gone to.

as for the work outside of classes and lectures... obviously its not the same each week. sometimes there will be big pieces of work etc. i'd say on average for each of the 4 modules i did maybe 2-3 hours of work towards the exercises to be handed in the next week and maybe 1-2 hours of reading, so between 12-20 hours works extra per week. maybe more, i'm not entirely sure. the exercises themselves don't really take that long if you understand well what is going on, and you can just botch them and wait for ur classes to explain them. but i never really did that except in stats, and sometimes i would spend ages trying to understand the maths exercises. plus if u want to do all "compulsory" reading it may take ages. for the AC100 module for instance there is loads of reading, especially for management accounting, though it isn't necessary really. on the other hand EC102 reading is necessary in my opinion and there is a lot of that, as some of the concepts may be quite difficult to understand at first..

but of course you can be like my friend, who really did very little work, but still managed to get a first with a combination of last minute revision, a flukey EC102 mark and a very easy stats paper... but as davemarkey says, unless u work consistently hard it is very easy to fall behind..
well this is my experience:

if you have a good teacher worht going to classes. otherwise just goto every other one (so you dont get in trouble for not going)

EC102 - first term: worth going to lectures as young is good. second term: not really worht going to lectures, hes rubbish and everything is in the book.
Not much work needed outside of class.

Stats: waste of time to goto lectures. notes are good (his folder). however, this may change for you since i hear balmer is retiring?

Maths: lectures, waste of time. IF you can't understand the notes (which are good) its worth going to the extra session.

AS for languages - yes they do double your work load as you have coursework and like 4hours of classes. Plus it requires loads of work outside..
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alisama
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(Original post by drs1357)
well this is my experience:

if you have a good teacher worht going to classes. otherwise just goto every other one (so you dont get in trouble for not going)

EC102 - first term: worth going to lectures as young is good. second term: not really worht going to lectures, hes rubbish and everything is in the book.
Not much work needed outside of class.

Stats: waste of time to goto lectures. notes are good (his folder). however, this may change for you since i hear balmer is retiring?

Maths: lectures, waste of time. IF you can't understand the notes (which are good) its worth going to the extra session.

AS for languages - yes they do double your work load as you have coursework and like 4hours of classes. Plus it requires loads of work outside..

oh yeh i didn't mention i never went to stats lectures, i just watched them online whilst reading through the notes, because balmer is not worth the effort. the reason i watched the lectures online is because his notes often make massive leaps, which he only explains in his lectures.. anyway this is probably irrelevant as i think there will be a new lecturer this year.

i thought the maths lectures were okay, sure you don't have to go, and they don't really explain anything other than the notes, but i liked to go because it forced me to start thinking about the maths by being gently explained it, which is a lot nicer than looking at the notes for the first time... especially if you've only got a normal a-level in maths.. the maths practice session was just simply practice for me, whether i understood the notes perfectly or not, i liked to go, and it fit in well as i had a class just before it.

ec102... well young is good to go to but he doesn't really explain much other than the book in my opinion... marin was okay but the same principle applies to him as it does to maths.


what i do like about going to lectures is that they structured my week... after lectures i would do the work usually. if you never go to any lectures there is always the chance that you won't do any work at all, which is what i saw from a couple of my friends. obviously everyone is different though, and people work in different ways.
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Knogle
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nyway this is probably irrelevant as i think there will be a new lecturer this year.
What? We don't get the experience Balmer?! Our LSE experience will be incomplete!
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drs1357
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each to his own i guess, it really just comes down to how much you think you need to do to get what you want to get..
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kstone122
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(Original post by davemarkey)
...but obviously you need to work hard ALL THE TIME. If you fall behind no one will help you....unless you have really good friends who'll give you their notes :p:
Is this true for postgrads as well? I hear that you spend your whole first term looking for jobs so I'm a bit concerned to be frank. I can't even imagine what LSE exams will look like: everything from the kinds of questions that will be asked to the exam format (multiple choice, free response, etc.), I'm also worried that there will be huge issues regarding time constraints.
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2late
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Because there are time constraints, which I hate and can't adapt to
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motorhead
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(Original post by alisama)
oh yeh i didn't mention i never went to stats lectures, i just watched them online
is it possible for everyone to watch it? or it's necessary to be an LSE student and a password etc.. ?
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zxczxc
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If you have an LSE username and password then you can access the ST102 lectures via WebCT.
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motorhead
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(Original post by zxczxc)
If you have an LSE username and password then you can access the ST102 lectures via WebCT.
:frown: no..
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zxczxc
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(Original post by motorhead)
:frown: no..
What do you want to look at them for? Not all that many LSE students turn up, you must be insane to want to watch them!
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superchemical
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(Original post by drs1357)
languages double your work load.
Ooo, yes, very true. Slaps on an additional six hours of contact time to your timetable and 987459837504509 hours of independent study. I'll never forget the hours I spent trying to perfect my handwritten Cyrillic so I wouldn't get told off for writing my work in print.
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puravida
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next year Alwyn Young is teaching both micro and macro! LOok forward to it!

Having said that, the macro part this year was far easier than the micro...and Marin made the macro part....

the exam next year will be TRICKEY!
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Pedsdude
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Can anyone who did BMS shed some light on the timetable/workload? I'm presuming it'll be pretty similar to Economics considering the first year course is similar, but then again I might be wrong...
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alisama
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(Original post by Pedsdude)
Can anyone who did BMS shed some light on the timetable/workload? I'm presuming it'll be pretty similar to Economics considering the first year course is similar, but then again I might be wrong...
i do economics and had exactly the same modules as my bms friend in the first year, as I selected accounting for my option. BMS students don't get an option in the first year... they do Econ B, ST102, MA100, AC100
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Christina
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Any geographers out there... ? *silence*

ah well, yeah any geographers contributing to this would be much appreciated, thank you
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