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    I am an arts graduate trying to find my way in the world. I graduated, and then the typical graduate blues hit me, I realised I'm landed in an over-saturated market with thousands of other grads fighting for the most basic roles- which I could've done without a degree.

    The last part is the most frustrating. You'd think that as someone with a higher level of skill, knowledge, commitment and time invested- that- an employer would be more willing to invest in you.

    When I left school and throughout my college years, apprenticeship opportunities in my field of study was dire- particularly where I lived. So I decided to further my education. Nowadays five to ten years on, there are apprenticeships all over the spot. Some I would probably benefit from. In reflection, I'd have much rather gained the industry experience first and done an apprenticeship, then a degree. Had I known that holding a degree would exclude me from an apprenticeship I'd have not bothered. I think it was a case of, there were no apprenticeships at the time, and since then the need has grown again as the economy recognises the trades more.


    Some of my friends, and acquaintances are doing rather well in their careers- much better than me- and it often gets me down because I'm doing all I can. Applying for tons of jobs, crafting my CV, been very careful about things, and I occasionally get referrals or shortlisted, the odd interview. But I'm always knocked back.

    On top of this, my software skills and design abilities seem to have fallen off the wagon in my search for work. Self-esteem has taken a hit and I generally feel unworthy to employers.

    This leads me to question whether I'm actually any good at it, and I start questioning is it really for me, as my interests wanes. It's really as much a wellbeing thing as it is motivation.

    Is it really that all my peers are as successful as it seems? You look on their Facebook pages, and they are off to the Seychelles on family holidays, going to country retreats, buying designer gear. They enjoy life.

    I don't. What gives?
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    I am an arts graduate trying to find my way in the world. I graduated, and then the typical graduate blues hit me, I realised I'm landed in an over-saturated market with thousands of other grads fighting for the most basic roles- which I could've done without a degree.

    The last part is the most frustrating. You'd think that as someone with a higher level of skill, knowledge, commitment and time invested- that- an employer would be more willing to invest in you.

    When I left school and throughout my college years, apprenticeship opportunities in my field of study was dire- particularly where I lived. So I decided to further my education. Nowadays five to ten years on, there are apprenticeships all over the spot. Some I would probably benefit from. In reflection, I'd have much rather gained the industry experience first and done an apprenticeship, then a degree. Had I known that holding a degree would exclude me from an apprenticeship I'd have not bothered. I think it was a case of, there were no apprenticeships at the time, and since then the need has grown again as the economy recognises the trades more.


    Some of my friends, and acquaintances are doing rather well in their careers- much better than me- and it often gets me down because I'm doing all I can. Applying for tons of jobs, crafting my CV, been very careful about things, and I occasionally get referrals or shortlisted, the odd interview. But I'm always knocked back.

    On top of this, my software skills and design abilities seem to have fallen off the wagon in my search for work. Self-esteem has taken a hit and I generally feel unworthy to employers.

    This leads me to question whether I'm actually any good at it, and I start questioning is it really for me, as my interests wanes. It's really as much a wellbeing thing as it is motivation.

    Is it really that all my peers are as successful as it seems? You look on their Facebook pages, and they are off to the Seychelles on family holidays, going to country retreats, buying designer gear. They enjoy life.

    I don't. What gives?
    I'm afraid that a degree on its own doesn't demonstrate that you have all that. Also you need to stop comparing yourself, facebook doesn't show the whole picture. Do you have work experience? When you write your cover letters, do you tailor each one, demonstrate why you want to work at that oragnisation and how you meet each point on the job description with examples? At interview, do you show your enthusiasm for the role and emphasis the relevant skills and experience you have? Do you ask for feedback post interview?
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I'm afraid that a degree on its own doesn't demonstrate that you have all that. Also you need to stop comparing yourself, facebook doesn't show the whole picture. Do you have work experience? When you write your cover letters, do you tailor each one, demonstrate why you want to work at that oragnisation and how you meet each point on the job description with examples? At interview, do you show your enthusiasm for the role and emphasis the relevant skills and experience you have? Do you ask for feedback post interview?
    I agree to some extent that it doesn't. I'm talking more about the act of having studied for a degree, shows employers you are capable of time management, research, reading, commitment etc by actually undertaking and successfully completing study. All of these qualities are important life skills, which I do document in my CV/cover letters as well as my subject specific abilities.

    I don't have any solid work experience for companies in commercial environments. I have voluntary projects, and projects I've done for free for clients to build my portfolio. I didn't undertake any placement while in Uni, perhaps (and regrettably) in reflection I would've faired better.

    Yes I try to tailor each one as specifically as possible. Many of the jobs I apply to are within the same line of work, and they ask for broad and well rounded candidates, its actually quite difficult to tick all the boxes.

    I have asked for feedback, although I've been fortunate to have been offered it. My main problem is my interviewing, as i get very nervous and socially awkward. I suffer from social anxiety so its no surprise I feel this way, clearly these experiences are nerve wracking to the average joe, never-mind someone with a predisposition to anxiety.

    I find it hard to be assertive in interview because I lack confidence and I stumble on my words and stutter because of the uncertainty of it all.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    I agree to some extent that it doesn't. I'm talking more about the act of having studied for a degree, shows employers you are capable of time management, research, reading, commitment etc by actually undertaking and successfully completing study. All of these qualities are important life skills, which I do document in my CV/cover letters as well as my subject specific abilities.

    I don't have any solid work experience for companies in commercial environments. I have voluntary projects, and projects I've done for free for clients to build my portfolio. I didn't undertake any placement while in Uni, perhaps (and regrettably) in reflection I would've faired better.

    Yes I try to tailor each one as specifically as possible. Many of the jobs I apply to are within the same line of work, and they ask for broad and well rounded candidates, its actually quite difficult to tick all the boxes.

    I have asked for feedback, although I've been fortunate to have been offered it. My main problem is my interviewing, as i get very nervous and socially awkward. I suffer from social anxiety so its no surprise I feel this way, clearly these experiences are nerve wracking to the average joe, never-mind someone with a predisposition to anxiety.

    I find it hard to be assertive in interview because I lack confidence and I stumble on my words and stutter because of the uncertainty of it all.
    Most employers would much rather that was demonstrated in a working environment though, I guess with so many having a degree and also the fact you do get a small minority of graduates who don't understand the importance of turning up on time, dressing smartly, don't have a good work ethic which reflects badly on all of us. And voluntary experience still counts- I never did any paid placements whilst at university, only volunteering and voluntary placements and they were still just as useful. As far as the interviews go, is there anyone that can help you practice? It can really help reduce some of the uncertainity.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    You'd think that as someone with a higher level of skill, knowledge, commitment and time invested- that- an employer would be more willing to invest in you.
    Absolutely not. A degree is, at the end of the day, just a piece of paper, and is only useful when applying for jobs to ensure you get past the initial filter.

    Why would an employer want to invest in someone with no work experience, who hasn't been exposed to workplace etiquette, who has no way of proving that they will be up to the job?
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Absolutely not. A degree is, at the end of the day, just a piece of paper, and is only useful when applying for jobs to ensure you get past the initial filter.

    Why would an employer want to invest in someone with no work experience, who hasn't been exposed to workplace etiquette, who has no way of proving that they will be up to the job?
    What about for those who have just left school at the age of 16 when that is the legal age to work?
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    What about for those who have just left school at the age of 16 when that is the legal age to work?
    Cheap labour, it's kinda obvious that work experience isn't going to make much of a difference if they can go out and hire people for less than half/just over half the cost per hour.

    Min wage for an Apprentice is £3.30
    Min wage for an under 18 is £3.87
    (assumed) min wage for the OP: £7.20

    When employers don't have to pay you as much, work experience isn't all that important, but when you hit that £7.20 band, work experience is pretty much a must, else finding a job can prove rather difficult.

    OP: It might be worth doing some voluntary work, or at least some kind of work experience. It's not ideal, but it might help you get your foot in the door with more companies.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    I agree to some extent that it doesn't. I'm talking more about the act of having studied for a degree, shows employers you are capable of time management, research, reading, commitment etc by actually undertaking and successfully completing study. All of these qualities are important life skills, which I do document in my CV/cover letters as well as my subject specific abilities.
    But everyone who is competing with you has shown these same skills. This is the bare minimum required to apply for a job.

    Just keep trying to build your portfolio. Even if it's not work related, it shows your skills and shows a passion you have.
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    (Original post by TheMcSame)
    Cheap labour, it's kinda obvious that work experience isn't going to make much of a difference if they can go out and hire people for less than half/just over half the cost per hour.

    Min wage for an Apprentice is £3.30
    Min wage for an under 18 is £3.87
    (assumed) min wage for the OP: £7.20

    When employers don't have to pay you as much, work experience isn't all that important, but when you hit that £7.20 band, work experience is pretty much a must, else finding a job can prove rather difficult.

    OP: It might be worth doing some voluntary work, or at least some kind of work experience. It's not ideal, but it might help you get your foot in the door with more companies.
    I was merely trying to point out ChaosKass' post because she/he made it sound like young people shouldn't be allowed work because they are new to the employment market.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    What about for those who have just left school at the age of 16 when that is the legal age to work?
    The fact that they are just 16 and are unlikely to have any work experience should be taken into account by the employers.
 
 
 
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