Has Football lost its soul? Watch

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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
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Did anyone buy the Observer newspaper today, because with it came a big sports magazine written by Tom Bower and David Conn and it asked the question has Football lost its soul?

Mainly because of all the takeovers, foreign players and player agents.

It also mentions how when the Premier League started the average wage a year was £75,000, then it goes on to say with Scott Parker of West Ham earning that same amount in a week.
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Hubert Poo
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#2
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Football has certainly changed dramatically in this country during that time; whether it has lost its soul is a difficult question, though it's most definitely exchanged some things for others which were either outdated or decaying beyond suitable repair.

The Taylor Report and the creation of the Premier League are obviously watersheds in English football history. There's good and bad points throughout; all seater stadiums are the crux on which our newfound finance is built to this day, but everyone knows the difficulties it seems to have presented regarding atmosphere and in turn for that increased revenue the actual ticket prices needed to generate it. The formation of the Premiership gave unequalled power to the clubs themselves; some say it weakens the F.A., whilst others profess it is the only method of strengthening our clubs' hand at the European table. In all honesty there's probably elements of truth throughout.

So, it would likely depend on what you define as football's soul. Is it ground atmopshere? Fan power? Or club size and influence? Perhaps the most unfortunate thing is since the creation of the Premiership those two major elements have come into direct opposition on more than one occasion; fans now petition their own clubs to lower prices, and yet know trophies are partly dependent on that additional revenue.

Maybe in the long run football hasn't lost it's soul, but is still trying to find it.
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Prince Rhyus
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#3
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A couple of articles from the magazine:
http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/sport/20..._cant_buy.html

http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/sport/20..._sell_out.html

I think it lost its soul ages ago, and that this was confirmed by England's World Cup performances in 2006.

Having been brought up on football and having religiously watched every single world cup since Italia '90, the real sad thing for me is that the first 3 premiership grounds that I ever went to in my life were this year - and as part of conferences for work. (I even stayed in a hotel at Bolton's "reebok stadium" that is built into it.)

It's a very functional place - on the edge of town and can seat everyone as demanded by the Taylor report resulting from the Hillsborough disaster. (The report I have no problem with. It's a shame that much of the architecture of stadiums has become "identikit".)

The other thing is lifestyles and salaries. The Arsenal team of the late 1980s and early 90s I could relate to. With the current lot, being a team full of players from all over the place sky-high salaries, it's a team full of wealthy non-entities.

I agree that the style of football that Wenger brought in during the late 1990s was a real step on from what was there before. He also got rid of some of the drinking culture - as did Bergkamp. But with the loss of the spine - Seaman, the back 4 of Dixon, Winterburn, Adams and Keown, I just don't feel any connection with any of the current lot.

Accessability is another thing. One of my old schoolmates lived down the same road as Ray Clemence and Pat Jennings while they were playing for Spurs & England, and Arsenal and Northern Ireland respectively. No longer do players seem to live within the communities of their fans. Rather the stockbroker belts of the cities where they play - or even further.

That plus the celebrity culture and the aim of every other glamour model under the sun to snare themselves a footballer.

As a child I always wanted to be a player like Gary Lineker - who famously never got booked or sent off. Would I want to be one of today's lot? Not really.

Compared to other employers, football clubs have a huge amount of catching up to do in terms of a duty of care to their employees. Players need more guidance about how to deal with the fame that is thrust on their shoulders. Once training is over, players need to get back into the communities of their fan bases and make more of a positive impact.

Everyone has the right to socialise as they please (so long as it's not illegal!), but I'd rather see today's footballers making backpage headlines for the right reasons rather than front-page headlines for the wrong ones.
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AYE
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#4
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Well the celeb culture must have one of the biggest influences on the players, and thats not their fault really?

Plus the demand/supply of players means that its a market rife with teams offering massive pay packets. You can't really argue with the economics behind it.


Thoguh I must add that a lto of football players don't fit into the sterotype of "Chav" esque. People liek Defoe and kuyt etc are family men, and in kuyts case he does a lot of charity work on the side.
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kpg
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#5
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Resounding yes. High level footy is too money-oriented
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Prince Rhyus
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(Original post by AYE)
Well the celeb culture must have one of the biggest influences on the players, and thats not their fault really?

Plus the demand/supply of players means that its a market rife with teams offering massive pay packets. You can't really argue with the economics behind it.
In the short term, no. The problem arises if we find a few years down the line that this whole thing is a bubble that is waiting to (and subsequently does) burst. Think of the dotcom boom of the late 1990s.

I can imagine there being a lot of angry people if clubs with large numbers of supporters go bankrupt with grounds being sold to pay off debts. I can also imagine the Government taking a very very dim view of the whole thing and really tighten up governing procedures in the event of this. Think of how the Taylor report on stadiums changed things.
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ManUtdFanDean
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#7
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I wouldnt say its lost its soul, and it gets more and more exciting every season, but the 1 thing i find rediculous is the wages, no person should get 75k+ a week..most people dont earn that a year..would most players still play if they only got the normal wage as every1 else? some players move for the money and then u can say its lost its soul but not all do
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Ronaldo VII
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#8
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There was a comparison between the top footballers and entertainment (on the pitch) that they provide in a year and their wages, and the top hollywood actors and actresses and the entertainment that they provide in a year and footballers were far better value for money when on a similar wage lol. Saying that, both are paid far too much but if the industry produces that large amount, its better that the players creating it get a fair share rather than fat cats.
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DontBuyTheSun
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#9
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In short, it hasn't lost its soul. Its pimped and whored it out to the biggest corporates they can.

Fans are seen as meer inconvienences instead of the lifeline of football that they are.
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jakatak
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#10
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loyal determined players still exist even at the top of the pile... kaka is a shining example... tevez, rooney, owen etc i think play football for the sake of football... i don;t believe it has lost its soul.. maybe it is flirting with the devil, but it hasn't sold out completely... you can see within the fans the passion that still exists..

arsenal, for example, want to maintain their heritage and footballing principles by not selling out to a billionaire.. but it will take a major coup for billionaires not to have the final say in almost every premiership club very soon...
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kpg
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#11
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arsenal, for example, want to maintain their heritage
At the Emirates Stadium, yes.

Just like I used to sit on the McDonalds Kop

Or how Sammy Lee now manages at the Reebok stadium
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johnboy91
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#12
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(Original post by jakatak)
loyal determined players still exist even at the top of the pile... kaka is a shining example... tevez, rooney, owen etc i think play football for the sake of football...
You say loyal determined players and then mention Rooney... It's not like their huge wages don't help even if they do play for the sake of football.
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K.O.S
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#13
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all i want from the Prem is having the best standard of football possible. having soul and passion doesn't make you the best league in the world, quality does.

having foreign takeovers investing millions into clubs, top foreign players attracted to the Prem and having the best coaches in the world is what makes you the best league in the world.

and in a few years as this process continues the Premiership will be THE league in the world. at the moment La Liga still up there imo.

You only have to look at the signings Man Utd, Liverpool and of course Chelsea have made shows the benefits.

why have soul when you can have the next generations Henry, Zidane, Ronaldinho, Totti ALL playing in the Premiership as i think might easily be the case in 10 years.
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DontBuyTheSun
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#14
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(Original post by jakatak)
l owen etc i think play football for the sake of football...
Owen plays football for England. No one else. Mercenary ****.

Football stinks of corruption from the top to the bottom, and its the match going fans who get **** on.
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DontBuyTheSun
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(Original post by K.O.S)
why have soul when you can have the next generations Henry, Zidane, Ronaldinho, Totti ALL playing in the Premiership as i think might easily be the case in 10 years.
This is all good, except that i go the match to support LFC. I dont go the match to see 'wonderful talents' and the like. By attainin the players above, it pushes average fans out as ticket prices rise to pay for new signings.
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kpg
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#16
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(Original post by DontBuyTheSun)
Owen plays football for England. No one else. Mercenary ****.

.
Total *******s lad and you know it. Took a pay cut to move to Spain, prepared to take a further pay cut to move back to Liverpool. Almost 300 games for Liverpool.

all i want from the Prem is having the best standard of football possible. having soul and passion doesn't make you the best league in the world, quality does.
Are you looking at it from the perspective of footballers showing passion here?!
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sebas_back
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#17
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(Original post by DontBuyTheSun)
This is all good, except that i go the match to support LFC. I dont go the match to see 'wonderful talents' and the like. By attainin the players above, it pushes average fans out as ticket prices rise to pay for new signings.
If I knew how to quote multiple responses I'd do it, but this and the one above it are basically the problem summed up.
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madhattertom
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#18
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It has a bit loads of people I know support the top clubs dont live near them and hardly ever go to the games and because the premership teams have so much money its really hard for small teams to get to the premership. Like with my team Luton birminham bough Rowan Vine for the sake of buying him because they have loads of money.
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DontBuyTheSun
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#19
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(Original post by kpg)
Total *******s lad and you know it. Took a pay cut to move to Spain, prepared to take a further pay cut to move back to Liverpool. Almost 300 games for Liverpool.
Maybe so, but you cannot deny that his England Career has ALWAYS took priority in his career.
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kpg
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#20
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(Original post by DontBuyTheSun)
Maybe so, but you cannot deny that his England Career has ALWAYS took priority in his career.
Why? There's absolutely no evidence to it except leaving Madrid to make sure he was playing footy before the world cup.

He was forced to return from injury countless times under Houllier for the benefit of the club
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