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    Just wondering on the opinion of others who have studied the Sciences, what would be the things to revise early or perhaps ensure to know.

    - Hardest topic of Chem/Phys/Bio?
    - When to start revising certain ones? How early?
    - Concepts that are good to understand?

    -General advice/tips and tricks

    I'm doing Triple Science + CompSci, and I need A*AA so I have no room for mistakes.

    Thanks
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    I only done physics&chemistry, but have heard a lot from people doing biology (but don't take my word for it)
    Physics has the harder concepts, Biology is a lot of memorization of the textbook and Chemistry is a mix of the two. Chem&Bio generally have higher grade boundaries than Physics, this year Physics (OCR A) was ~45/70 for an A whilst Chem&Bio were ~55/70, so there's more room for error in physics.
    Don't let yourself get behind in Physics, the concepts for Chemistry are not difficult to pick up on however Physics can take a while to understand what's actually happening, I'd advise you to not leave a lesson having not understood the topic or at least have work to improve on it, as it saves so much time when revising. When it came to revising most people were just making notes/reading them etc but some were still unsure of concepts and could spend days trying to understand it all over again.
    For Chem&Phys I found making notes was most useful, make notes that you understand in the briefest way possible (no point trying to remember a 200 page textbook). Cover as many past papers as possible and always write down any mistakes you make in a paper and understand why you got it wrong, did you just forget, not understand the question, use a wrong formula etc, and write down the markscheme for that question so you can review it later and know exactly what gets you marks.
    You don't have to start revising too early unless you want to, I started making notes&doing past papers around April (although I only had 2 sciences to worry about), and got A's for AS.
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    Chemistry

    Hardest topic (imo): Oxidation of alcohols, specifically reflux and reflux equations.

    I would just revise as you go along. In my opinion, I would start revising at the get go and make sure that after each lesson you understand every single thing you need to know. Some of the topics you will have met if you did the C3 GCSE unit, such as Q=mcT, therefore I would go back and read over your GCSE books for chemistry as it will help familiarise some topic. There are a lot of definitions and equations you need to remember, so just keep rereading/rewriting them, or whatever method you use to get things stuck in your head.

    You need to understand all of the concepts, the new specification exams are harder and will expect you to not only know what happens, but why it happens etc. Specifically, trends in boiling points/melting points come up all of the time, so make sure you know everything there is to know about each trend.

    Physics

    Hardest topic (imo): Mechanics. You really need to know how to work with the information they give you in the exam questions. Do past papers to make sure you can do this well before your exam.

    Physics is where you really need to understand the content well. Again, just follow the work as you do it in lessons but make sure you understand every concept, and if there is a single concept that you can't get your head around, ask TSR, watch a YouTube video or ask a teacher. I found that the textbook for Physics had loads of derivations which you don't need to know, so you can entirely skip over them if you so wish.

    Again, understand everything. Specifically, understand all of the particle interactions and the equations for them. Most people find them difficult, but they're easy marks to pick up in the exam.

    Biology

    Hardest topic (imo): Genetic diversity.

    There is loads of content for Biology, and therefore you may want to read ahead of your class slightly if you feel that they are working at too slow of a pace for you. That will give you more time for revision before your final exams.

    There is very little understanding needed for Biology. There are quite a few processes that you need to know in detail, make sure you know them well, as the exam is likely to have a long 6/7/8 marker on one (or even two). Since the whole of the subject is just remembering the content, i'd advise you to just read through your textbook as many times as it takes to remember everything.

    General advice

    Don't rely too much on past exam papers as they have changed for the new specification and therefore learning the mark schemes/perfect answers will not work.

    The specimen papers are horrible and are far harder than the actual exams. Attempt them, but do not be worried if you get a low mark as they really are difficult.

    Understand the content, don't remember it (except for biology, just remember everything).
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    (Original post by Productivity)
    Chemistry

    Hardest topic (imo): Oxidation of alcohols, specifically reflux and reflux equations.

    I would just revise as you go along. In my opinion, I would start revising at the get go and make sure that after each lesson you understand every single thing you need to know. Some of the topics you will have met if you did the C3 GCSE unit, such as Q=mcT, therefore I would go back and read over your GCSE books for chemistry as it will help familiarise some topic. There are a lot of definitions and equations you need to remember, so just keep rereading/rewriting them, or whatever method you use to get things stuck in your head.

    You need to understand all of the concepts, the new specification exams are harder and will expect you to not only know what happens, but why it happens etc. Specifically, trends in boiling points/melting points come up all of the time, so make sure you know everything there is to know about each trend.

    Physics

    Hardest topic (imo): Mechanics. You really need to know how to work with the information they give you in the exam questions. Do past papers to make sure you can do this well before your exam.

    Physics is where you really need to understand the content well. Again, just follow the work as you do it in lessons but make sure you understand every concept, and if there is a single concept that you can't get your head around, ask TSR, watch a YouTube video or ask a teacher. I found that the textbook for Physics had loads of derivations which you don't need to know, so you can entirely skip over them if you so wish.

    Again, understand everything. Specifically, understand all of the particle interactions and the equations for them. Most people find them difficult, but they're easy marks to pick up in the exam.

    Biology

    Hardest topic (imo): Genetic diversity.

    There is loads of content for Biology, and therefore you may want to read ahead of your class slightly if you feel that they are working at too slow of a pace for you. That will give you more time for revision before your final exams.

    There is very little understanding needed for Biology. There are quite a few processes that you need to know in detail, make sure you know them well, as the exam is likely to have a long 6/7/8 marker on one (or even two). Since the whole of the subject is just remembering the content, i'd advise you to just read through your textbook as many times as it takes to remember everything.

    General advice

    Don't rely too much on past exam papers as they have changed for the new specification and therefore learning the mark schemes/perfect answers will not work.

    The specimen papers are horrible and are far harder than the actual exams. Attempt them, but do not be worried if you get a low mark as they really are difficult.

    Understand the content, don't remember it (except for biology, just remember everything).
    So Chemistry is not like a memorization test like in GCSE
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    (Original post by kagawa88)
    So Chemistry is not like a memorization test like in GCSE
    In a way, yes. Not as much as Biology though.

    You mainly need to memorise reactions, mechanisms, equations etc. but you also need to understand all of the concepts underpinning those.
 
 
 
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