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    (Original post by john2054)
    If you buy an investment portfolio, the fund managers will do this leg work for you.
    Yes, but I can be more competent than them. They are fund managers, they over-diversify and take less risk.

    I only hold 11 securities, while a fund manager will usually hold 70-120. A lot of what they are holding is bad, even if a lot of it is good.

    You will achieve far greater returns picking your own securities, rather than relying on a fund manager. You don't make money following the sheep, you make money going against the sheep.
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    Yes, but I can be more competent than them. They are fund managers, they over-diversify and take less risk.

    I only hold 11 securities, while a fund manager will usually hold 70-120. A lot of what they are holding is bad, even if a lot of it is good.

    You will achieve far greater returns picking your own securities, rather than relying on a fund manager. You don't make money following the sheep, you make money going against the sheep.
    Whilst I can understand this, I simply don't have the time to invest in researching/monitoring to do this myself.*

    I've put a bit of money with Wealthify (a similar concept to Nutmeg) and have been very impressed so far. As an early joiner, I only pay a 0.5% fee. Currently us 6.12% (post fees) according to the online portal since May and my plan is a 2 out of 5 on their risk scale (5 being the most risky), so generally quite cautious.*
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    (Original post by Dewsy)
    Whilst I can understand this, I simply don't have the time to invest in researching/monitoring to do this myself.*

    I've put a bit of money with Wealthify (a similar concept to Nutmeg) and have been very impressed so far. As an early joiner, I only pay a 0.5% fee. Currently us 6.12% (post fees) according to the online portal since May and my plan is a 2 out of 5 on their risk scale (5 being the most risky), so generally quite cautious.*
    I suggest you put your money with a good fund manager then, Neil Woodford and Terry Smith are 2 big names in the fund management world.

    Woodford has constantly beat the market return, so I highly suggest you go with him.

    http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-disco...e-accumulation

    I have £25,000 in shares and bonds. I've managed so far in 1.5 months a 8% return, but this is due to a lot of carnage post brexit. Also I've studied finance and investing at university, which helps me pick stocks/bonds well.

    Investing is not hard to learn, just follow the points I wrote above. Buy good companies at good prices. That's all you have to do.
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    (Original post by Untrue)
    I get over £13 a month from TSB.

    Over £8 from interest, and £5 for using contactless payments.

    I do not pay any fees.
    I've been getting about £50 a month from Santander (in interest and cash back) :O

    Gutted they're halving the interest but it still seems the best deal for me
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    The funds I really like are the India funds, so much potential in India over the next 10 years....

    + modi as PM, very pro business, anti corruption
    + large population
    + youth very educated and smart

    http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-disco...tion-inclusive

    ^^ I actually have £1100 in this fund, I highly recommend it. It's the only fund I own, I usually share/bond pick unless I am clueless about the companies in a country.
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    I suggest you put your money with a good fund manager then, Neil Woodford and Terry Smith are 2 big names in the fund management world.

    Woodford has constantly beat the market return, so I highly suggest you go with him.

    http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-disco...e-accumulation

    I have £25,000 in shares and bonds. I've managed so far in 1.5 months a 8% return, but this is due to a lot of carnage post brexit. Also I've studied finance and investing at university, which helps me pick stocks/bonds well.

    Investing is not hard to learn, just follow the points I wrote above. Buy good companies at good prices. That's all you have to do.
    I should also add that we have quite stringent dealing in securities policies at work and any action to do with listed securities has to be specifically approved in advance (the process can take 24-48hrs). Exercising any sort of discretion is not typically worth the hassle.

    EDIT: I'm also not convinced that the past 2 months are a very good indicator - as you described it, 'carnage' haha.
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    Buy good companies at good prices. That's all you have to do.
    Yep, couldn't be easier mate.
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    (Original post by stirkee)
    Yep, couldn't be easier mate.
    When you buy stocks, think of it as when you go around to buy your supermarket shopping not when you go to buy perfume.

    So you buy good quality goods at cheap prices.

    This is what benjamin graham taught us and I live by this principle. Never overpay for a security, no matter how good the company is. That's why I like to stick to P/E multiples below 15 when buying stocks.
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    If you ever see the P/E of a company drop below 10 and you feel nothing is fundamentally wrong with the company (after doing some digging-it's always good to dig!), you should be buying that company.

    So always check the companies profits, dividends, dividend cover, debt etc. If the company has been losing money for years and there is virtually no dividend cover and the business looks terrible, you shouldn't touch it, even with a low P/E.

    The market prices securities looking forward (a lot of time dramatically wrong as well), you need to be aware why the market has given this company a low P/E multiple and investigate accordingly.
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    When you buy stocks, think of it as when you go around to buy your supermarket shopping not when you go to buy perfume.

    So you buy good quality goods at cheap prices.

    This is what benjamin graham taught us and I live by this principle. Never overpay for a security, no matter how good the company is. That's why I like to stick to P/E multiples below 15 when buying stocks.
    This thread is about current accounts, not shares. Stock-picking is not relevant to what the OP is after.
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    (Original post by The Financier)
    This thread is about current accounts, not shares. Stock-picking is not relevant to what the OP is after.
    Current accounts give you no interest these days. OP should be moving a lot of his money into shares unless the BOE and FED starts to raise the base rate to more normal levels.

    I've given a lot of useful knowledge on this thread, it will help a lot of people to pick stocks well.
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    First - Not being a British national here so what I say might not be 100% as good as what others say, but here goes:

    I have an account with Natwest and HSBC. My Natwest is my primary account (for now) since it has no overdraft and is a straight up checking account. They seem to be a good bank, never had any problems with them and the mobile app is actually pretty good.

    My HSBC is a student account, so if you're not in / planning to go to uni then you can't get this - have a checking and a credit account with them. They support Android Pay (similar to my real bank back home, or at least kind of!).
    But, my experience with HSBC has been a pain in the ass, to say the least. Had a bunch of troubles getting online banking to work, since they use a weird system which happened to also be broken when I signed up! Mobile app is pretty poor, but hey, you get Android Pay so you don't need to use it as much.
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    Current accounts give you no interest these days. OP should be moving a lot of his money into shares unless the BOE and FED starts to raise the base rate to more normal levels.

    I've given a lot of useful knowledge on this thread, it will help a lot of people to pick stocks well.
    As was stated in the start of the thread, there are interest-paying current accounts. Whilst the rates are being cut since the BoE's rate cut, they still pay decent amounts (5% on TSB, 4% on Lloyds etc.) and the requirements aren't usually too difficult to fill. They also possess FSCS protection and thus carry far less risk than shares.

    It may well be the case that shares can play a part in the OP's allocation in future, but that is not clear just from the information provided. Telling someone to move a lot of their money into shares without any consideration of risk tolerance, time horizon or goal, is reckless and irresponsible when you're not even making it clear that an investment carries downside risk. This is someone else's personal finances we're talking about here.
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    (Original post by The Financier)
    As was stated in the start of the thread, there are interest-paying current accounts. Whilst the rates are being cut since the BoE's rate cut, they still pay decent amounts (5% on TSB, 4% on Lloyds etc.) and the requirements aren't usually too difficult to fill. They also possess FSCS protection and thus carry far less risk than shares.

    It may well be the case that shares can play a part in the OP's allocation in future, but that is not clear just from the information provided. Telling someone to move a lot of their money into shares without any consideration of risk tolerance, time horizon or goal, is reckless and irresponsible when you're not even making it clear that an investment carries downside risk. This is someone else's personal finances we're talking about here.
    I've provided some very good knowledge on this thread, it's OP's job to dig further. One does not simply make 8% in 1.5 months being an amateur in the markets. I can easily achieve around 50% return this year in a worst case scenario.

    5% and 4% lol, on like your first £2000 right? What a joke. Current account rates are more like 0.1%. OP wants current accounts, not saving accounts. Though I could find you some very safe bonds giving you 5% and you can invest as much as you want.

    I'd even suggest OP go venture into the bond market, quite a few speculative bonds trading at 8/9%. But then OP needs to understand yield to maturity, par value etc. How interest rates affect bonds etc
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    (Original post by Gadero2)
    When you buy stocks, think of it as when you go around to buy your supermarket shopping not when you go to buy perfume.

    So you buy good quality goods at cheap prices.

    This is what benjamin graham taught us and I live by this principle. Never overpay for a security, no matter how good the company is. That's why I like to stick to P/E multiples below 15 when buying stocks.
    well yes... obviously...

    the difficulty is FINDING those good quality stocks at cheap prices.
 
 
 
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