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    Hi,

    I just recieved my GCSE results last week: 1 A the rest Cs.

    I'm not exactly happy with my results because it means that I don't get to do Maths or any of the sciences.. but none the less I passed!

    With my results I could only get into an ok/bad sixth form college doing Economics, History and Art. It was either go to an ok/bad sixth form college and study 3 A levels or stay at my grammar school, which is one of the BEST schools in west london according to the times, but study 1 BTEC (Sports Science) + 2 A levels. To me it just makes more sense to study 3 A levels than to study a BTEC that is not really respected by many universities and something that I have NO interest in.

    Anyway, I'm here to ask for your guy and gal's tips, advice or guides on how to get atleast an A at A level. At the end of A levels I would like to go to UCL and study Architecture and then hopefully complete all the other parts to become a fully chartered Architect.

    The sort of tips that I'm looking for are tips focused at the early stages of a level and less on revision, like what I should be doing before my class like reading ahead to the next topic so that I become ahead of everyone else? What should I be doing after class, like should I be reviewing my notes from the class I just had? What should I be doing during my study period and stuff like that.

    Also I think it would be helpful if you can talk about the mistakes you had while you were studying for your a levels.

    I do plan on going full extreme hardcore mode and have a full mindset of doing work all the time and practically have no social life, but obviously I will take in to consideration the need for rest.

    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by DGAF)
    Hi,

    I just recieved my GCSE results last week: 1 A the rest Cs.

    I'm not exactly happy with my results because it means that I don't get to do Maths or any of the sciences.. but none the less I passed!

    With my results I could only get into an ok/bad sixth form college doing Economics, History and Art.

    Anyway, I'm here to ask for your guy and gal's tips, advice or guides on how to get atleast an A at A level. At the end of A levels I would like to go to UCL and study Architecture and then hopefully complete all the other parts to become a fully chartered Architect.

    The sort of tips that I'm looking for are tips at the early stages of a level and less on revision, like what I should be doing before my class like reading ahead to the next topic so that I become ahead of everyone else? What should I be doing after class, like should I be reviewing my notes from the class I just had? What should I be doing during my study period and stuff like that.

    Also I think it would be helpful if you can talk about the mistakes you had while you were studying for your a levels.

    I do plan on going full extreme hardcore mode and have a full mindset of doing work all the time and practically have no social life, but obviously I will take in to consideration the need for rest.

    Thanks in advance
    To start with: no matter how hardcore your mindset is at the beginning, there is a 99% chance that you will not live up to this. But the higher you aim the more work you're likely to do (:
    Reading ahead can be useful because it means you're going over things twice. It also means that you can come prepared with questions, and you can spend less time getting your head round things and more time making notes! After class/free period reviewing is good- rewriting notes, and then rewriting them again.
    I think the best advice for the beginning is to know what you're learning! Find the specs for your subjects, how many modules, the content size, ect. Lets you know how much revision is best.
    A big thing that I know a lot of people regret is not enough work at home. This is particularly important if you're not at a particularly good college! I had a crappy Gov/Pol teacher last year, only those of us who took learning into our own hands got good grades!
    If I regret anything it's not starting earlier enough. Things are a lot less stressful when it's spaced out, and goes into more reliable long term memory (:
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    Thank you so much for the advice, DeafeningSilence and thank you for sharing your regrets.

    (Original post by DeafeningSilence)
    To start with: no matter how hardcore your mindset is at the beginning, there is a 99% chance that you will not live up to this. But the higher you aim the more work you're likely to do (:
    I understand what you mean when you say that I might not live up to the mindset that I will intitially have. I have seen a lot of people say I'm gonna change my life around, no more detentions, no more exclusions, no more saturday detentions and I must admit, that was me at GCSE, but after reviewing my faults and failures during gcse and finally realizing how important a levels are for getting into uni I'm going to fight whatever urge I have to get the A lvl results I need. I promise
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    (Original post by DGAF)
    Thank you so much for the advice, DeafeningSilence and thank you for sharing your regrets.



    I understand what you mean when you say that I might not live up to the mindset that I will intitially have. I have seen a lot of people say I'm gonna change my life around, no more detentions, no more exclusions, no more saturday detentions and I must admit, that was me at GCSE, but after reviewing my faults and failures during gcse and finally realizing how important a levels are for getting into uni I'm going to fight whatever urge I have to get the A lvl results I need. I promise
    Well that's an awesome mindset! More often than not people I met were disappointed with their grades this year. Every time it was clear, at least to me, they probably could've done more. I didn't do enough at the beginning of the year, but the fear soon set in and when you get that feeling and that motivation you will do the work! If you've had disappointing GCSE's that might be helpful to fuel that feeling haha !

    I've also done both History and Econ so if you have any specific questions let me know.... Also, just putting it out there, but is there no way of you doing maths at all? Just because I've heard that's pretty vital for most Architecture degrees (:
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    (Original post by DeafeningSilence)
    Well that's an awesome mindset! More often than not people I met were disappointed with their grades this year. Every time it was clear, at least to me, they probably could've done more. I didn't do enough at the beginning of the year, but the fear soon set in and when you get that feeling and that motivation you will do the work! If you've had disappointing GCSE's that might be helpful to fuel that feeling haha !

    I've also done both History and Econ so if you have any specific questions let me know.... Also, just putting it out there, but is there no way of you doing maths at all? Just because I've heard that's pretty vital for most Architecture degrees (:
    I think there is more than enough fuel to motivate me haha

    Would be awesome if you could give me tips on how to improve my eassy writing skillz. I was decent on the factual stuff and dates but I was terrible with dealing with exam technique and especially forming ideas/opinions in history. That was the biggest turn off for me when I was studying History

    There is actually a way for me to study maths but that will mean me working independetly and relying on tutors online which just sounds dodgy unless I get a tutor who'll see regularly each week but that all means paying a fee. I know its worth a few hundrew quid but studying four a levels sounds tough from what I hear from friends and I also have a plan on working part time while doing A levels but I'm still not 100% sure on that ^^

    UCL doesn't have specific subject requirements at A level but you need to have had passed english and maths AND have had studied a language at GCSE which might be a problem but I will confirm with their admissions hotline. Studying A lvl maths will certainly give me an edge at the applying stage but hopefully my art will make up for that.

    Thank you so much for your help!! )
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    (Original post by DGAF)
    I think there is more than enough fuel to motivate me haha

    Would be awesome if you could give me tips on how to improve my eassy writing skillz. I was decent on the factual stuff and dates but I was terrible with dealing with exam technique and especially forming ideas/opinions in history. That was the biggest turn off for me when I was studying History

    There is actually a way for me to study maths but that will mean me working independetly and relying on tutors online which just sounds dodgy unless I get a tutor who'll see regularly each week but that all means paying a fee. I know its worth a few hundrew quid but studying four a levels sounds tough from what I hear from friends and I also have a plan on working part time while doing A levels but I'm still not 100% sure on that ^^

    UCL doesn't have specific subject requirements at A level but you need to have had passed english and maths AND have had studied a language at GCSE which might be a problem but I will confirm with their admissions hotline. Studying A lvl maths will certainly give me an edge at the applying stage but hopefully my art will make up for that.

    Thank you so much for your help!! )
    It will be a lot more facts than at GCSE, I did 0 revision for GCSE but hours for A-Level. But if you've got the basic skill you should be fine! Essay writing is, unfortunately, a matter of practise. Do some practise questions and get your lecturer to mark them, if possible. In general though, when it comes to opinions, always sound confident, whether you believe yourself or not. It's entirely possible to predict the sort of questions that'll come up- if you're prepared to put the revision in, you can form a lot of opinions before the exam! Getting your own personal structure is good so you know when and where to put things in.

    I would certainly look into things regarding subjects! You don't want to get halfway through your a levels after so much hard work and realise you have slim chances without maths. In terms of time, I managed 3 days a week of netball, boyfriend, social life and a weekend job and came out with 4 A's at the end of the year! It's definitely possible if you can organise things.

    No problem! I would have loved as much advice as possible so I'm happy to give it haha.
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    (Original post by DeafeningSilence)
    It will be a lot more facts than at GCSE, I did 0 revision for GCSE but hours for A-Level. But if you've got the basic skill you should be fine! Essay writing is, unfortunately, a matter of practise. Do some practise questions and get your lecturer to mark them, if possible. In general though, when it comes to opinions, always sound confident, whether you believe yourself or not. It's entirely possible to predict the sort of questions that'll come up- if you're prepared to put the revision in, you can form a lot of opinions before the exam! Getting your own personal structure is good so you know when and where to put things in.

    I would certainly look into things regarding subjects! You don't want to get halfway through your a levels after so much hard work and realise you have slim chances without maths. In terms of time, I managed 3 days a week of netball, boyfriend, social life and a weekend job and came out with 4 A's at the end of the year! It's definitely possible if you can organise things.

    No problem! I would have loved as much advice as possible so I'm happy to give it haha.
    I understand what you mean by predicting exam questions but this year is a new year syllabus.. I'm worried that because it's a new syllabus, my teachers might not have a 100% understanding of what the course entails and nearly having 0 resources for the new syllabus' like examiners note and stuff like that.. I feel like that carries a lot of pressure to perform iindividually than to rely on my teachers and the internet which is what I djd and what I'm comfortable with and to provide information and knowledge to future candidates taking the new a level syllabus' so they know what they're getting themselves into. I feel like we are the guinea pigs that the government uses to test out ideas and new structures and see what is good for them. ://

    I will definitely do more research this week on what each uni entry requirement is and call their admissions office to see whether I fit their criteria.

    I think it's impressive that you can juggle so much stuff while doing FOUR A levels ahahah, but I feel like we are different the way we work. It would be a huge step for me to suddenly switch from semi relaxed to hardcore (no sexual pun intended) especially walking into a new school with students who are not at all focused on their studies. A lot of 'roadmen' will be coming to this school so I don't wish to be socially associated with that particular group so not having a social life wont be a big deal for me. I will see how my timetable works and if I can fit in some part time work during the weekend, that would be splendid!

    Can I ask where you went to work part time? I don't know whether you live in the countryside but I certainly find it difficult to find a job here in London.. maybe I am just picky? :/
 
 
 
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