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Will Brown change UK foreign policy? watch

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    Will Brown set a new tone for the UK's relationship with the US?

    Gordon Brown is set to have talks with President George W Bush which will set a new tone for US-British relations after years of exceptionally warm ties between Mr Bush and his predessor Tony Blair.

    En route to the US, Mr Brown described himself as an "Atlanticist" and described the link with the US as the UK's "most important bilateral relationship".

    However a foreign office minister had suggested the two countries would no longer be "joined at the hip" on foreign policy.

    How will Brown get on with Bush? Will Brown's relationship with George Bush be as cosy as Tony Blair's? Send us your views and experiences.

    Click here to read the main story (on the BBC website)
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    Let's hope so, but I'm not going to fool myself! I was reading the Times earlier at work, and I completely agree with Mr Campbell.
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    It is true that the USA is our most important ally, both militarily and economically. It is a sad fact that without the USA's support this country would be a lot weaker and not be in as influential a position in world politics as it is, although our position at the top is unfortunately somewhat related more to our impressive history than what we have to offer now.

    That said, it is vital that we are our own nation, and we cannot simply follow round the Americans like a loyal dog, we need to stand up to them as Thatcher did to Reagan. Reportedly she had several heated arguments with Reagan and was not afraid to express her own opinion, compared to Blair and Bush where Bush is most definitely in control.

    Hopefully Brown will understand the importance of a special relationship with the USA but at the same time not allow this relationship to become one of master and slave but instead of two equal partners who have their own say. I expect this will become much easier with a new president next year as Bush may be somewhat used to getting his own way with the UK by now.
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    We need US support but not at the expense of diplomatic enslavement and the deaths of both British soldiers and innocent victims of Bush's so-called 'war-on-terror'. We should cut and run and talk to his successor, who will hopefully be more sensible.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    We need US support but not at the expense of diplomatic enslavement and the deaths of both British soldiers and innocent victims of Bush's so-called 'war-on-terror'. We should cut and run and talk to his successor, who will hopefully be more sensible.
    Everyone says Britain needs America's support...but I mean, do you really see America refusing to trade with Britain and cutting off economic ties because Britain wouldn't join in with them in a war, or if Britain votes against them in the UN?

    Britain should stand up for justice and the US foreign policy is anything but just.

    -Rashid
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    (Original post by Rashid)
    Everyone says Britain needs America's support...but I mean, do you really see America refusing to trade with Britain and cutting off economic ties because Britain wouldn't join in with them in a war, or if Britain votes against them in the UN?

    Britain should stand up for justice and the US foreign policy is anything but just.

    -Rashid
    I agree with you entirely - we may need the US but they also need us, and there is no reason to be bullied into any more reckless wars.
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    We need the US, we've been one of their closest allies since before WWII, and I cannot see that ending now. Dionysus is right, the US do need us, but we mustn't allow ourselves to be dragged into anything the UK as a nation would not benefit from, morally, economically or politically.
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    He's said a couple of things since my last post (gordon brown) which are very worrying, and imply there will be no change in position whatsoever.
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    (Original post by Have Your Say)
    Will Brown set a new tone for the UK's relationship with the US?

    Gordon Brown is set to have talks with President George W Bush which will set a new tone for US-British relations after years of exceptionally warm ties between Mr Bush and his predessor Tony Blair.

    En route to the US, Mr Brown described himself as an "Atlanticist" and described the link with the US as the UK's "most important bilateral relationship".

    However a foreign office minister had suggested the two countries would no longer be "joined at the hip" on foreign policy.

    How will Brown get on with Bush? Will Brown's relationship with George Bush be as cosy as Tony Blair's? Send us your views and experiences.

    Click here to read the main story (on the BBC website)
    Yes. he will make changes.
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    (Original post by Bezzler)
    although our position at the top is unfortunately somewhat related more to our impressive history than what we have to offer now.
    I'd say it's more closely linked to the fact we have the 5th biggest economy in the world, and the only country behind the US with even a small ability to project our military force beyond our own (watery) borders.
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    Where does Brown fall on these questions? It is inconceivable that he'll repudiate Blair's legacy, for the practical reason that he is associated with it whether he likes it or not. The demeaning rationalizations of Hillary Clinton for supporting the Iraq war are as nothing compared with the tergiversations that Brown would have to undertake to escape from Blair's approach. He will not do it because he cannot do it. But he might in declaratory policy and military deployment stress operations in Afghanistan at the expense of Iraq. Troop levels in Helmand province in Afghanistan are scheduled to increase by 800 to 5,800 by the end of the summer. Fighting Al Qaeda and its allies, and upholding nascent constitutional government in Afghanistan and Iraq, will remain priorities. But extricating Brown's own political reputation from the wreckage of Bush's Iraq policy will take time.

    Under Brown, it's safe to say that rhetoric will remain consistent with the Blair years but the heart will be lacking. Last January, Brown laid down free universal education and climate change as twin tracks of his approach to foreign policy. The subtext was that government must protect and intervene--but in the realm of soft power exerted through multilateral institutions. Brown is close to the Democratic establishment, well read in American political history, and the longest continuously serving chancellor of the Exchequer for almost 200 years: He knows the importance of the American diplomacy that created the Bretton Woods system and the associated institutions. He almost certainly believes, too, in the wisdom of the adjunct to that diplomacy: President Truman's willingness, after 1947, to engage in protracted (and electorally damaging) military commitments to counter totalitarianism. It's doubtful that Brown regards that type of intervention, by us and by our allies, as a model for his own premiership.

    Brown's will be far from an isolationist government, but the uncertain diplomacy of the Tony Blair's lame-duck premiership is an inauspicious precedent. Iran's serial nuclear deceptions and abduction of British servicemen have secured propaganda victories and possibly worse for the mullahs and their puppet president. Incumbent British Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett and Defense Secretary Des Browne are clearly neither competent nor knowledgeable about their briefs--yet they lack obvious successors.
 
 
 
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