Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
Turn on thread page Beta

Extenuating circumstances for anorexia - starting AS levels watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Confusing situation here.

    I'm not officially diagnosed with anorexia, but my doctors have mentioned it in passing and said that it was worrying that I'd lost so much in such a short space of time, but put it down to the fact that I have a thyroid problem and gained a lot of weight when that wasn't being treated. So now that I have medication for it, my metabolism is actually working and the weight is dropping off, both because of that and my eating disorder, and because they only know about the former they aren't pushing for an ED diagnosis. I'm currently in the middle of my worst relapse but I'm lying through my teeth to family and doctors because I obviously don't want anyone to know. I'm honestly very surprised that they haven't already slapped a diagnosis on me. Throughout the GCSE exam period, I was extremely depressed and my thyroid problem was at its worst then too, but I didn't yet have the meds. I tried opening up to my mum about my depression then but she seems to think it all went away with my thyroid meds, so I haven't pushed it because right now I really don't want anyone on my mental health case as my ED is such a massive secret.

    I did better than expected in GCSEs but I'm worried about how this probably isn't going to be the case with AS/A levels. I've heard of the extenuating circumstances rule but people generally say that you need to apply for that as soon as you can. I know that this year is going to be more of a struggle - new place, new people, new subjects, more work, a job, same mental health issues but now with my ED coming back full-blown - but I'm not mentally ready to recover from my ED, although I'm fairly certain that the only way to apply is to wave your diagnosis at them.

    So there's my problem: I'm not diagnosed, but could be at any time if I opened up (which I have no intention of doing currently as I know it would put me in a worse place), and you need medical proof before they'll take into account your circumstances during exams.

    I don't know what to do. I know what's best for my physical health and academic career, but that is going to have such a massive effect on my mental health (which is already terrible) and I'm scared of that knock-on effect that's going to happen with the amount of dedication you need to put into recovery. I just don't think that I'm going to be able to handle that, so in my eyes it seems best to keep quiet about everything and not tell anyone for the sake of extenuating circumstances privilege so that I can actually survive sixth form. I know most would disagree though.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Confusing situation here.

    I'm not officially diagnosed with anorexia, but my doctors have mentioned it in passing and said that it was worrying that I'd lost so much in such a short space of time, but put it down to the fact that I have a thyroid problem and gained a lot of weight when that wasn't being treated. So now that I have medication for it, my metabolism is actually working and the weight is dropping off, both because of that and my eating disorder, and because they only know about the former they aren't pushing for an ED diagnosis. I'm currently in the middle of my worst relapse but I'm lying through my teeth to family and doctors because I obviously don't want anyone to know. I'm honestly very surprised that they haven't already slapped a diagnosis on me. Throughout the GCSE exam period, I was extremely depressed and my thyroid problem was at its worst then too, but I didn't yet have the meds. I tried opening up to my mum about my depression then but she seems to think it all went away with my thyroid meds, so I haven't pushed it because right now I really don't want anyone on my mental health case as my ED is such a massive secret.

    I did better than expected in GCSEs but I'm worried about how this probably isn't going to be the case with AS/A levels. I've heard of the extenuating circumstances rule but people generally say that you need to apply for that as soon as you can. I know that this year is going to be more of a struggle - new place, new people, new subjects, more work, a job, same mental health issues but now with my ED coming back full-blown - but I'm not mentally ready to recover from my ED, although I'm fairly certain that the only way to apply is to wave your diagnosis at them.

    So there's my problem: I'm not diagnosed, but could be at any time if I opened up (which I have no intention of doing currently as I know it would put me in a worse place), and you need medical proof before they'll take into account your circumstances during exams.

    I don't know what to do. I know what's best for my physical health and academic career, but that is going to have such a massive effect on my mental health (which is already terrible) and I'm scared of that knock-on effect that's going to happen with the amount of dedication you need to put into recovery. I just don't think that I'm going to be able to handle that, so in my eyes it seems best to keep quiet about everything and not tell anyone for the sake of extenuating circumstances privilege so that I can actually survive sixth form. I know most would disagree though.
    It does sound like it would be best to ket your doctor know. I hid my home circumstances from everyone for so many years, but as soon as I did I got loads of support and people started to understand me better. If you were to receive a diagnosis and treatment for an ED, they would support you with any other mental health issues you may have as well. They won't just leave you alone to worry about things. While right now it seems that the easier option would be to keep quiet and push through, you would be not only putting your education at risk but also your health. If you don't deal with this you will likely find that you feel the same way about uni and about working, and the problem will just keep on going. You could always start by just talking to your GP and seeing what they say, and thinking about telling other people later. Just try and take things one step at a time. I wish you all the best. I'm sorry your in such a situation

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Confusing situation here.

    I'm not officially diagnosed with anorexia, but my doctors have mentioned it in passing and said that it was worrying that I'd lost so much in such a short space of time, but put it down to the fact that I have a thyroid problem and gained a lot of weight when that wasn't being treated. So now that I have medication for it, my metabolism is actually working and the weight is dropping off, both because of that and my eating disorder, and because they only know about the former they aren't pushing for an ED diagnosis. I'm currently in the middle of my worst relapse but I'm lying through my teeth to family and doctors because I obviously don't want anyone to know. I'm honestly very surprised that they haven't already slapped a diagnosis on me. Throughout the GCSE exam period, I was extremely depressed and my thyroid problem was at its worst then too, but I didn't yet have the meds. I tried opening up to my mum about my depression then but she seems to think it all went away with my thyroid meds, so I haven't pushed it because right now I really don't want anyone on my mental health case as my ED is such a massive secret.

    I did better than expected in GCSEs but I'm worried about how this probably isn't going to be the case with AS/A levels. I've heard of the extenuating circumstances rule but people generally say that you need to apply for that as soon as you can. I know that this year is going to be more of a struggle - new place, new people, new subjects, more work, a job, same mental health issues but now with my ED coming back full-blown - but I'm not mentally ready to recover from my ED, although I'm fairly certain that the only way to apply is to wave your diagnosis at them.

    So there's my problem: I'm not diagnosed, but could be at any time if I opened up (which I have no intention of doing currently as I know it would put me in a worse place), and you need medical proof before they'll take into account your circumstances during exams.

    I don't know what to do. I know what's best for my physical health and academic career, but that is going to have such a massive effect on my mental health (which is already terrible) and I'm scared of that knock-on effect that's going to happen with the amount of dedication you need to put into recovery. I just don't think that I'm going to be able to handle that, so in my eyes it seems best to keep quiet about everything and not tell anyone for the sake of extenuating circumstances privilege so that I can actually survive sixth form. I know most would disagree though.
    Think about what doing poorly in your exams and knowing you decided not to do anything before would do to your mh too. I know it's really hard to open up about mh issues (it took me at least a year to build up the courage to get a diagnosis and I still haven't opened up about everything 3 years later), but all you need to do is give enough info for a diagnosis and then you can leave it. It can really help to have the extra support from extenuating circumstances etc and if you are willing to you could also apply for DSA (helped me a bunch!).
    Personally I would also advise you to talk to your doctor about how they can help you. I know its something you want to manage alone but it's worth trying. If you don't ike it you can leave at any point and you only need to talk about what you feel comfortable with. I found therapy helpful for me even though for a long time it was just me going in and spending a bit of time with somebody who didn't think I was somehow crazy or lying or whatever.

    Honestly though for me DSA was a god send! It helped me out a lot and gave me that safety net I needed. It meant things like teachers not questioning me being late and being lienient if i'd had a hard time finishing work.

    It is important that you feel comfortable with whatever you do, but just remember that sometimes you need to push yourself a little to make a big difference.
    Offline

    19
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I don't know what to do. I know what's best for my physical health and academic career, but that is going to have such a massive effect on my mental health (which is already terrible) and I'm scared of that knock-on effect that's going to happen with the amount of dedication you need to put into recovery. I just don't think that I'm going to be able to handle that, so in my eyes it seems best to keep quiet about everything and not tell anyone for the sake of extenuating circumstances privilege so that I can actually survive sixth form. I know most would disagree though.
    If you let this go on and don't seek help, you certainly won't receive special consideration from the examiners or universities that you apply to. Despite this, you may do very well and even get into a top uni. But, if you don't receive help with recovery now, your physical condition will deteriorate such that you find yourself unable to go to uni at all when the time comes.

    And of course, you know that by continuing to live with this illness you are shortening your life.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 6, 2016
Poll
“Yanny” or “Laurel”

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.